Clinical Focus


  • Hematology
  • Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cancer Cell Therapy

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Internship: Cedars Sinai Medical Center Internal Medicine Residency (1998) CA
  • Fellowship: Stanford University Bone Marrow Transplant Fellowship (2016) CA
  • Board Certification: American Board of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology (2015)
  • Board Certification: American Board of Internal Medicine, Hematology (2015)
  • Fellowship: Loma Linda University Hematology and Medical Oncology Fellowship (2015) CA
  • Board Certification: American Board of Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine (2000)
  • Residency: St Mary's Medical Center Internal Medicine Residency (2000) CA
  • Medical Education: Kilpauk Medical College (1995) India

Clinical Trials


  • A Phase 1 Study of Engineered Donor Grafts (Orca-Q) in Recipients Undergoing Allogeneic Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies Recruiting

    This study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of engineered donor grafts ("OrcaGraft"/"Orca-Q") in participants undergoing myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant transplantation for hematologic malignancies.

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  • Safety and Efficacy of Axicabtagene Ciloleucel in Combination With Rituximab in Participants With Refractory Large B-Cell Lymphoma Not Recruiting

    The primary objective of this study is to estimate the efficacy of axicabtagene ciloleucel in combination with rituximab, as measured by assessment of response rates in adult participants with relapsed/refractory large B-cell lymphoma.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Cancer Clinical Trials Office (CCTO), 650-498-7061.

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  • Study of Lenzilumab and Axicabtagene Ciloleucel in Participants With Relapsed or Refractory Large B-Cell Lymphoma Not Recruiting

    The primary objectives of this study are: Phase 1: To evaluate the safety of sequenced therapy with lenzilumab and axicabtagene ciloleucel in participants with relapsed or refractory large B-cell lymphoma and identify the most appropriate dose of lenzilumab for Phase 2. Phase 2: To evaluate the incidence of neurologic events with sequenced therapy given at the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of lenzilumab in participants with relapsed or refractory large B-cell lymphoma.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Cancer Clinical Trials Office (CCTO), 650-498-7061.

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  • Tabelecleucel in Combination With Pembrolizumab in Subjects With Epstein-Barr Virus-associated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (EBV+ NPC) Not Recruiting

    This is a multicenter, open-label, single-arm Phase 1B/2 study to assess the safety and efficacy of tabelecleucel in combination with pembrolizumab for the treatment of subjects with platinum-pretreated, recurrent/metastatic Epstein-Barr Virus-associated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (EBV+ NPC).

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Cancer Clinical Trials Office (CCTO), 650-498-7061.

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  • Treatment of GVHD in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) Recipients Using AAT Plus Corticosteroids (CS) Compared With Corticosteroids Alone (BMT CTN 1705) Not Recruiting

    Study CSL964_5001 will investigate the efficacy of AAT with corticosteroids compared with corticosteroids alone as first line therapy for patients with high-risk acute GVHD

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Cancer Clinical Trials Office (CCTO), 650-498-7061.

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All Publications


  • Real-world Experience of Cryopreserved Allogeneic Hematopoietic Grafts in the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Single Center Report. Transplantation and cellular therapy Bankova, A. K., Caveney, J., Yao, B., Ramos, T. L., Bogeholz, J., Heydari, K., Diaz, N., Jackson, M. L., Lowsky, R., Brown, J. W., Johnston, L., Rezvani, A. R., Frank, M. J., Muffly, L., Weng, W., Sidana, S., Negrin, R. S., Miklos, D. B., Shiraz, P., Meyer, E. H., Shizuru, J. A., Arai, S. 1800

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: As a result of the COVID-19 widespread pandemic, cryopreservation of allogeneic donor apheresis products was implemented to mitigate the challenges of donor availability and product transport. Although logistically beneficial, the impact of cryopreservation on clinical outcomes and graft composition remains unclear.OBJECTIVES: To compare the outcomes and graft composition with cryopreserved versus fresh allografts in the setting of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT).STUDY DESIGN: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical outcomes of 30 consecutive patients who received cryopreserved allografts between March and August 2020 as compared to 60 consecutive patients who received fresh allografts prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Primary endpoints were hematopoietic engraftment, graft failure (GF) and secondary outcomes were overall survival (OS), relapse free survival (RFS) and non-relapse mortality (NRM). In addition, extended immunophenotype analysis was performed on cryopreserved versus prospectively collected fresh apheresis samples.RESULTS: Compared to fresh allografts, both neutrophil and platelet recovery were delayed in recipients of cryopreserved reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) allo-HCT with median times to engraftment of 24 days vs 18 days (P = .01) and 27 days vs 18 days (P = .069), respectively. We observed primary GF in 4 of 30 patients in the cryopreserved cohort (13.3%) vs only one of 60 patients (1.7 %) in the fresh cohort (P = .03). Cryopreserved RIC allo-HCT was associated with significantly lower median total, myeloid and T-cell donor chimerism at 1 month. OS and RFS were inferior for cryograft recipients with hazard ratio [HR (95%Cl)]: 2.16 (1.00, 4.67) and 1.90 (0.95, 3.79), respectively. Using an extended immunophenotype analysis we compared 14 samples from the cryopreserved cohort to 6 prospectively collected fresh apheresis donor samples. These analyses showed both decrease in total cell viability and significantly reduced absolute numbers of NK cells (CD3-CD56+) in the cryopreserved apheresis samples.CONCLUSION: In this single institution study we note delayed engraftment and a trend toward clinical inferiority of cryopreserved vs fresh allografts. Further evaluation of the use of cryopreserved allografts and their impact on clinical and laboratory outcomes is warranted.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jtct.2022.01.010

    View details for PubMedID 35042013

  • Incidence and risk factors associated with bleeding and thrombosis following chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy BLOOD ADVANCES Johnsrud, A., Craig, J., Baird, J., Spiegel, J., Muffly, L., Zehnder, J., Tamaresis, J., Negrin, R., Johnston, L., Arai, S., Shizuru, J., Lowsky, R., Meyer, E., Weng, W., Shiraz, P., Rezvani, A., Latchford, T., Mackall, C., Miklos, D., Frank, M., Sidana, S. 2021; 5 (21): 4465-4475
  • T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Current Concepts in Molecular Biology and Management. Biomedicines Shiraz, P., Jehangir, W., Agrawal, V. 2021; 9 (11)

    Abstract

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an uncommon, yet aggressive leukemia that accounts for approximately one-fourth of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases. CDKN2A/CDKN2B and NOTCH1 are the most common mutated genes in T-ALL. Children and young adults are treated with pediatric intensive regimens and have superior outcomes compared to older adults. In children and young adults, Nelarabine added to frontline chemotherapy improves outcomes and end of consolidation measurable residual disease has emerged as the most valuable prognostic marker. While outcomes for de-novo disease are steadily improving, patients with relapsed and refractory T-ALL fare poorly. Newer targeted therapies are being studied in large clinical trials and have the potential to further improve outcomes. The role of allogeneic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is evolving due to the increased use of pediatric-inspired regimens and MRD monitoring. In this review we will discuss the biology, treatment, and outcomes in pediatric and adult T-ALL.

    View details for DOI 10.3390/biomedicines9111621

    View details for PubMedID 34829849

  • Alloantigen-specific type 1 regulatory T cells suppress through CTLA-4 and PD-1 pathways and persist long-term in patients. Science translational medicine Chen, P. P., Cepika, A., Agarwal-Hashmi, R., Saini, G., Uyeda, M. J., Louis, D. M., Cieniewicz, B., Narula, M., Amaya Hernandez, L. C., Harre, N., Xu, L., Thomas, B. C., Ji, X., Shiraz, P., Tate, K. M., Margittai, D., Bhatia, N., Meyer, E., Bertaina, A., Davis, M. M., Bacchetta, R., Roncarolo, M. G. 2021; 13 (617): eabf5264

    Abstract

    [Figure: see text].

    View details for DOI 10.1126/scitranslmed.abf5264

    View details for PubMedID 34705520

  • Concordance of peripheral blood and bone marrow measurable residual disease in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Blood advances Muffly, L., Sundaram, V., Chen, C., Yurkiewicz, I., Kuo, E., Burnash, S., Spiegel, J. Y., Arai, S., Frank, M. J., Johnston, L. J., Lowsky, R., Meyer, E. H., Negrin, R. S., Rezvani, A. R., Sidana, S., Shiraz, P., Shizuru, J. A., Weng, W., Liedtke, M., Vempaty, H. T., Miklos, D. B. 2021; 5 (16): 3147-3151

    Abstract

    Monitoring of measurable residual disease (MRD) is essential to the management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and is typically performed through repeated bone marrow (BM) assessments. Using a next-generation sequencing (NGS) MRD platform, we performed a prospective observational study evaluating the correlation between peripheral blood (PB) and BM MRD in adults with ALL receiving cellular therapies (hematopoietic cell transplantation [HCT] and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell [CAR-T] therapies). Among the study cohort (N = 69 patients; 126 paired PB/BM samples), we found strong correlation between PB and BM MRD (r = 0.87; P < .001), with a sensitivity and specificity of MRD detection in the PB of 87% and 90%, respectively, relative to MRD in the BM. MRD became detectable in the PB in 100% of patients who subsequently relapsed following HCT, with median time from MRD+ to clinical relapse of 90 days, and in 85% of patients who relapsed following CAR T, with median time from MRD+ to clinical relapse of 60 days. In adult patients with ALL undergoing cellular therapies, we demonstrate strong concordance between NGS-based MRD detected in the PB and BM. Monitoring of ALL MRD in the PB appears to be an adequate alternative to frequent invasive BM evaluations in this clinical setting.

    View details for DOI 10.1182/bloodadvances.2021004234

    View details for PubMedID 34424318

  • CAR T cells with dual targeting of CD19 and CD22 in adult patients with recurrent or refractory B cell malignancies: a phase 1 trial. Nature medicine Spiegel, J. Y., Patel, S., Muffly, L., Hossain, N. M., Oak, J., Baird, J. H., Frank, M. J., Shiraz, P., Sahaf, B., Craig, J., Iglesias, M., Younes, S., Natkunam, Y., Ozawa, M. G., Yang, E., Tamaresis, J., Chinnasamy, H., Ehlinger, Z., Reynolds, W., Lynn, R., Rotiroti, M. C., Gkitsas, N., Arai, S., Johnston, L., Lowsky, R., Majzner, R. G., Meyer, E., Negrin, R. S., Rezvani, A. R., Sidana, S., Shizuru, J., Weng, W., Mullins, C., Jacob, A., Kirsch, I., Bazzano, M., Zhou, J., Mackay, S., Bornheimer, S. J., Schultz, L., Ramakrishna, S., Davis, K. L., Kong, K. A., Shah, N. N., Qin, H., Fry, T., Feldman, S., Mackall, C. L., Miklos, D. B. 2021

    Abstract

    Despite impressive progress, more than 50% of patients treated with CD19-targeting chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR19) experience progressive disease. Ten of 16 patients with large B cell lymphoma (LBCL) with progressive disease after CAR19 treatment had absent or low CD19. Lower surface CD19 density pretreatment was associated with progressive disease. To prevent relapse with CD19- or CD19lo disease, we tested a bispecific CAR targeting CD19 and/or CD22 (CD19-22.BB.z-CAR) in a phase I clinical trial ( NCT03233854 ) of adults with relapsed/refractory B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and LBCL. The primary end points were manufacturing feasibility and safety with a secondary efficacy end point. Primary end points were met; 97% of products met protocol-specified dose and no dose-limiting toxicities occurred during dose escalation. In B-ALL (n=17), 100% of patients responded with 88% minimal residual disease-negative complete remission (CR); in LBCL (n=21), 62% of patients responded with 29% CR. Relapses were CD19-/lo in 50% (5 out of 10) of patients with B-ALL and 29% (4 out of 14) of patients with LBCL but were not associated with CD22-/lo disease. CD19/22-CAR products demonstrated reduced cytokine production when stimulated with CD22 versus CD19. Our results further implicate antigen loss as a major cause of CAR T cell resistance, highlight the challenge of engineering multi-specific CAR T cells with equivalent potency across targets and identify cytokine production as an important quality indicator for CAR T cell potency.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41591-021-01436-0

    View details for PubMedID 34312556

  • Outcomes after delayed and second autologous stem cell transplant in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma. Bone marrow transplantation Lemieux, C., Muffly, L. S., Iberri, D. J., Craig, J. K., Johnston, L. J., Lowsky, R., Shiraz, P., Rezvani, A. R., Frank, M. J., Weng, W., Meyer, E., Shizuru, J. A., Arai, S., Liedtke, M., Negrin, R. S., Miklos, D. B., Sidana, S. 2021

    Abstract

    We evaluated the outcomes of 168 patients undergoing delayed or second autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) for relapsed multiple myeloma (MM) from 2010 to 2019. Overall, 21% (n=35) patients had received a prior transplant and 69% (n=116) underwent transplant at first relapse. Overall, 27% patients had high-risk cytogenetics and 15% had ISS stage III disease. Stem cell collection was performed after relapse in 72% and 35% of patients received maintenance therapy. Median PFS from salvage treatment and transplant were 28 and 19 months, respectively. Median OS from salvage treatment and transplant was 69 and 55 months. Multivariate analysis revealed that ASCT in first relapse was associated with superior PFS (HR 0.63, p=0.03) and OS (HR 0.59, p=0.04) compared to later lines of therapy. In addition, PFS of ≥36 months with prior therapy was associated with improved PFS (HR 0.62, p=0.04) and OS (HR 0.41, p=0.01). Ninety-five patients underwent delayed transplant at first relapse, median PFS and OS from start of therapy was 30 and 69 months, and median OS from diagnosis was 106 months. These data may serve as a guide when counseling patients undergoing ASCT for relapsed MM and provide a benchmark in designing clinical trials of transplantation/comparative treatments for relapsed MM.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41409-021-01371-1

    View details for PubMedID 34163014

  • Inferior Clinical Outcomes in Recipients of Cryopreserved Grafts Following Reduced Intensity Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Single Center Report Bankova, A., Caveney, J., Ramos, T., Bogeholz, J., Heydari, K., Diaz, N., Jackson, M., Lowsky, R., Brown, J., Johnston, L., Rezvani, A., Frank, M., Muffly, L., Weng, W., Sidana, S., Negrin, R., Miklos, D., Shiraz, P., Meyer, E., Shizuru, J., Arai, S. SPRINGERNATURE. 2021: 181
  • Phase 2 study of MGTA-145+plerixafor for rapid and reliable hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization for autologous transplant in multiple myeloma. Sidana, S., Bankova, A., Hosoya, H., Muffly, L. S., Kumar, S., Johnston, L. J., Lowsky, R., Meyer, E., Rezvani, A., Weng, W., Arai, S., Frank, M., Shiraz, P., Howell, H., Goncalves, K. A., Schmelmer, V., Davis, J., Shizuru, J., Miklos, D. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2021
  • Adoptively Transferred, In Vitro-Generated Alloantigen-Specific Type 1 Regulatory T (Tr1) Cells Persist Long-Term In Vivo Cepika, A., Chen, P. P., Agarwal, R., Saini, G., Louis, D. M., Amaya-Hernandez, L. C., Xu, L., Shiraz, P., Tate, K. M., Margittai, D., Bhatia, N., Meyer, E., Bertaina, A., Davis, M. M., Bacchetta, R., Roncarolo, M. CELL PRESS. 2021: 73
  • Stem Cell Mobilization in Multiple Myeloma: Comparing Safety and Efficacy of Cyclophosphamide +/- Plerixafor vs. G-CSF +/- Plerixafor in the Lenalidomide Era. Transplantation and cellular therapy Johnsrud, A., Ladha, A., Muffly, L., Shiraz, P., Goldstein, G., Osgood, V., Shizuru, J. A., Johnston, L., Arai, S., Weng, W., Lowsky, R., Rezvani, A. R., Meyer, E. H., Frank, M. J., Negrin, R. S., Miklos, D. B., Sidana, S. 2021

    Abstract

    Growth factor and chemotherapy-based stem cell mobilization strategies are commonly used for patients with multiple myeloma. We retrospectively compared 398 patients mobilized between 2017-2020 using either cyclophosphamide (4g/m2) plus granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) or G-CSF alone, with on demand plerixafor (PXF) in both groups. While total CD34+yield was higher after chemo-mobilization compared to GCSF+/-PXF (median 13.6 vs. 4.4 * 106/kg,P< .01), achievement of≥2 * 106CD34+ cells (95% vs 93.7%,P= .61), and rates of mobilization failure (5% vs. 6.3%,P= .61) were similar. Fewer patients required PXF with chemo-mobilization (12.3% vs 49.5%,P< .01), and apheresis sessions were fewer (median: 1, range 1-4 vs. 2, range 1-5). Complications were higher after chemo-mobilization (30% vs. 7.4%,P< .01), including neutropenic fever, ED visits, and hospitalizations. Prior lenalidomide≤6 cycles did not impair cell yield in either group.Median cost of mobilization was 17.4% lower in the GCSF +/- PXF group (P= .01).Differences in time to engraftment were not clinically significant. Given similar rates mobilization success, engraftment time, and less toxicity and lower costs compared to chemo-mobilization, G-CSF with on-demand PXF may be preferable in myeloma patients with adequate disease control and limited lenalidomide exposure.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jtct.2021.04.016

    View details for PubMedID 33915323

  • Use of Backup Stem Cells for Stem Cell Boost and Second Transplant in Patients with Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation. Transplantation and cellular therapy Liang, E. C., Muffly, L. S., Shiraz, P., Shizuru, J. A., Johnston, L., Arai, S., Frank, M. J., Weng, W., Lowsky, R., Rezvani, A., Meyer, E. H., Negrin, R., Miklos, D. B., Sidana, S. 2021

    Abstract

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is a standard treatment for multiple myeloma (MM). Consensus guidelines recommend collecting sufficient stem cells in case there is a need for stem cell boost for delayed/poor engraftment or for future second ASCT. However, collecting and storing backup stem cells in all patients requires significant resources and cost, and the rates of backup stem cell utilization are not well studied. We sought to examine the utilization of backup stem cells (BSCs) in patients with MM undergoing ASCT. Patients with MM aged ≥18 years old who underwent first ASCT at our institution from January 2010 through December 2015 and collected sufficient stem cells for at least 2 transplants were included in this single-center retrospective study. This timeframe was selected to allow for adequate follow-up. A total of 393 patients were included. The median age was 58 years (range, 25-73). After a median follow-up of 6 years, the median progression-free survival (PFS) of the cohort was 3 years. Sixty-one percent (n=240) of patients progressed or relapsed. Chemotherapy-based mobilization was used in almost all patients (98%). The median total CD34+ cells collected was 18.2*106/kg (range, 3.4-112.4). A median of 5.7*106 CD34+ cells/kg (range, 1.8-41.9) was infused during the first ASCT, and a median of 10.1*106 CD34+ cells/kg (range, 1.5-104.5) was cryopreserved for future use. Of the patients, 6.9% (n=27) used backup stem cells, with 2.3% (n=10) using them for stem cell boost, 4.6% (n=18) for a second salvage ASCT, including 1 patient for both stem cell boost and second ASCT. Rates of backup stem cell use among patients aged <60, 60-69, and ≥70 years were 7.8%, 5.7%, and 5.9%, respectively. There was a trend toward higher rates of backup stem cell use for second ASCT in patients who were younger, had suboptimal disease control at time of first ASCT, and longer PFS. The median dose of stem cell boost given was 5.6*106 CD34+ cells/kg (range, 1.9-20). The median time from stem cell boost to neutrophil, hemoglobin, and platelet engraftment was 4 (range, 2-11), 15 (range, 4-34), and 12 (range, 0-34) days, respectively. Lower CD34+ dose and older age at time of ASCT predicted need for stem cell boost. With new salvage therapies for relapsed MM, the rates of second ASCT are very low. The low rates of use suggest that institutional policies regarding universal BSC collection and long-term storage should be reassessed and individualized. However, need for stem cell boost in 2.3% of patients may present a challenge to that.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jtct.2021.02.026

    View details for PubMedID 33775587

  • Immune reconstitution and infectious complications following axicabtagene ciloleucel therapy for large B-cell lymphoma. Blood advances Baird, J. H., Epstein, D. J., Tamaresis, J. S., Ehlinger, Z., Spiegel, J. Y., Craig, J., Claire, G. K., Frank, M. J., Muffly, L., Shiraz, P., Meyer, E., Arai, S., Brown, J. W., Johnston, L., Lowsky, R., Negrin, R. S., Rezvani, A. R., Weng, W. K., Latchford, T., Sahaf, B., Mackall, C. L., Miklos, D. B., Sidana, S. 2021; 5 (1): 143-155

    Abstract

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy targeting CD19 has significantly improved outcomes in the treatment of refractory or relapsed large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL). We evaluated the long-term course of hematologic recovery, immune reconstitution, and infectious complications in 41 patients with LBCL treated with axicabtagene ciloleucel (axi-cel) at a single center. Grade 3+ cytopenias occurred in 97.6% of patients within the first 28 days postinfusion, with most resolved by 6 months. Overall, 63.4% of patients received a red blood cell transfusion, 34.1% of patients received a platelet transfusion, 36.6% of patients received IV immunoglobulin, and 51.2% of patients received growth factor (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) injections beyond the first 28 days postinfusion. Only 40% of patients had recovered detectable CD19+ B cells by 1 year, and 50% of patients had a CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells per μL by 18 months postinfusion. Patients with durable responses to axi-cel had significantly longer durations of B-cell aplasia, and this duration correlated strongly with the recovery of CD4+ T-cell counts. There were significantly more infections within the first 28 days compared with any other period of follow-up, with the majority being mild-moderate in severity. Receipt of corticosteroids was the only factor that predicted risk of infection in a multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 3.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-16.5). Opportunistic infections due to Pneumocystis jirovecii and varicella-zoster virus occurred up to 18 months postinfusion in patients who prematurely discontinued prophylaxis. These results support the use of comprehensive supportive care, including long-term monitoring and antimicrobial prophylaxis, beyond 12 months after axi-cel treatment.

    View details for DOI 10.1182/bloodadvances.2020002732

    View details for PubMedID 33570626

  • Immune reconstitution and infectious complications following axicabtagene ciloleucel therapy for large B-cell lymphoma BLOOD ADVANCES Baird, J. H., Epstein, D. J., Tamaresis, J. S., Ehlinger, Z., Spiegel, J. Y., Craig, J., Claire, G. K., Frank, M. J., Muffly, L., Shiraz, P., Meyer, E., Arai, S., Brown, J., Johnston, L., Lowsky, R., Negrin, R. S., Rezvani, A. R., Weng, W., Latchford, T., Sahaf, B., Mackall, C. L., Miklos, D. B., Sidana, S. 2021; 5 (1): 143–55
  • Epstein-Barr virus-positive lymphoproliferative disorder manifesting as pulmonary disease in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia: a case report. Journal of medical case reports Dutta, R. n., Miao, S. Y., Phan, P. n., Fernandez-Pol, S. n., Shiraz, P. n., Ho, D. n., Mannis, G. N., Zhang, T. Y. 2021; 15 (1): 170

    Abstract

     Patients with lymphoproliferative disorders following hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) most commonly present with fever and lymphadenopathy within the first 5 months of transplant. Pulmonary post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a particularly aggressive and rapidly progressive disease, with high morbidity and mortality. There are a very limited number of reported pulmonary PTLD cases following HSCT in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Early diagnosis and detection of pulmonary PTLD is critical given its high lethality. However, variable clinical presentations and nonspecific radiographic findings make pulmonary PTLD difficult to distinguish from other more common causes of pulmonary disease in AML patients.Here, we describe a 68-year-old Caucasian man who presented for salvage induction therapy following relapse of his AML after a haploidentical allogeneic HSCT 10 months earlier. He developed recurrent fevers, dry cough, and hypoxemia, with chest computed tomography (CT) showing bibasilar consolidations and increased nodularity without increased lymphadenopathy. His symptoms initially improved with antibiotic and antifungal therapy, but his follow-up chest CT showed progression of disease despite symptomatic improvement. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was detected in his blood by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and a lung biopsy revealed monomorphic PTLD with B cells positive for EBV. Unfortunately, the patient's condition rapidly deteriorated, and he passed away prior to treatment initiation. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an AML patient developing pulmonary PTLD relatively late in his post-transplant course in the setting of relapsed disease and salvage therapy. Pulmonary PTLD, a rare but highly lethal disorder, can imitate the symptoms and radiographic findings of pneumonia, a common diagnosis in immunocompromised AML patients. This case illustrates the importance of considering pulmonary PTLD in the differential diagnosis for pulmonary disease in AML patients with a history of HSCT, especially in the setting of progressive radiographic findings despite broad antibacterial and antifungal therapy. Further, our case demonstrates the importance of biopsy and uninterrupted EBV DNA monitoring in the definitive diagnosis of PTLD, given nonspecific symptomatology and radiographic findings.

    View details for DOI 10.1186/s13256-021-02744-2

    View details for PubMedID 33773605

  • Incidence and Risk Factors Associated with Bleeding and Thrombosis Following Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy. Blood advances Johnsrud, A. J., Craig, J., Baird, J. H., Spiegel, J. Y., Muffly, L., Zehnder, J. L., Tamaresis, J. S., Negrin, R. S., Johnston, L., Arai, S., Shizuru, J. A., Lowsky, R., Meyer, E., Weng, W. K., Shiraz, P., Rezvani, A. R., Latchford, T., Mackall, C. L., Miklos, D. B., Frank, M. J., Sidana, S. 2021

    Abstract

    Bleeding and thrombotic events are an emerging toxicity associated with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapies. To determine their incidence, we retrospectively analyzed consecutive adult patients (n=127) with large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL) or B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) treated between 2017-2020 with axicabtagene ciloleucel (axi-cel) (N=89) or a bispecific CD19/CD22 CAR (N=38). 12 (9.4%) and 8 (6.3%) patients developed bleeding and thrombosis within first 3 months, respectively. In the axi-cel subgroup, these occurred in 11.2% and 6.7%, respectively. Bleeding occurred between days 8-30 (median 17.5), and thrombosis between days 2-91 (median 29). Bleeding sites included genitourinary (N=6), soft tissue (N=2), intracranial (N=2), gastrointestinal (N=1), pulmonary (N=1), and were associated with features of consumptive coagulopathy. On univariate analysis, patients with bleeding were older (median 72 vs. 60 yrs, P<0.01), had lower baseline platelets (86 vs. 178 K/uL, P<0.01), lower platelet nadir after CAR-T (median 17.5 vs. 48 K/uL; P<0.01), lower fibrinogen nadir (median 122 vs. 340 ug/mL; P<0.01) and elevated LDH (P=0.01). ICANS grade ≥3 was associated with increased bleeding (50% vs. 15%; P=0.01), thrombosis (50% vs. 16%; P=0.04), PT prolongation, hypofibrinogenemia and elevated D-dimer. A paucity of events limited multivariate analysis, however low pre-treatment platelets were associated with bleeding in a multivariate logistic regression model. Patients with thrombocytopenia or severe ICANS are at increased risk of bleeding complications and should be closely monitored particularly within the first month after CAR therapy. Future studies in larger cohorts should assess risk factors for systemic coagulopathies in CAR-T therapy, including their association with neurotoxicity.

    View details for DOI 10.1182/bloodadvances.2021004716

    View details for PubMedID 34521106

  • Outcomes with Autologous or Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Plasma Cell Leukemia in the Era of Novel Agents. Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Lemieux, C., Johnston, L. J., Lowsky, R., Muffly, L. S., Craig, J. K., Shiraz, P., Rezvani, A., Frank, M. J., Weng, W., Meyer, E., Shizuru, J., Arai, S., Negrin, R., Miklos, D. B., Sidana, S. 2020

    Abstract

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and very aggressive plasma cell disorder. The optimal treatment approach, including whether to pursue an autologous (autoSCT) or allogeneic (alloSCT) transplant is not clear as there is lack of clinical trial based evidence. This single center retrospective study describes the outcomes of 16 patients with PCL (N=14 primary PCL) who underwent either autoSCT (N=9) or alloSCT (N=7) for PCL in the era of novel agents, between 2007 and 2019. Median age of the cohort was 58 years. High-risk cytogenetics were seen in 50% of patients. All patients received a proteasome inhibitor (PI) and/or immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) based regimen before transplant. At transplant, 10 (62%) patients obtained at least a very good partial response. Response after autoSCT (3 month) was at least VGPR in 6 (67%, CR=5) patients. All patients undergoing alloSCT achieved CR at 3 months. Maintenance was used in 5 patients (56%) after autoSCT. Median PFS from transplant in the autoSCT vs. alloSCT group was 6 vs. 18 months, p=0.09, while median OS from transplant was 19 vs. 40 months (p=0.41), respectively. The median OS from diagnosis was 27 vs. 49 months, p=0.50, respectively. Of all the deaths, 10 (91%) patients died of relapsed disease. In conclusion, alloSCT was not observed to offer any significant survival advantage over autoSCT in PCL, which is comparable to other recent reports and relapse remains the primary cause of death.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.bbmt.2020.08.035

    View details for PubMedID 32961371

  • Autologous stem cell transplantation versus no transplant in patients above 70 with multiple myeloma. Lemieux, C., Muffly, L. S., Iberri, D., Rezvani, A., Lowsky, R., Frank, M., Craig, J. K., Liedtke, M., Negrin, R., Weng, W., Meyer, E., Johnston, L. J., Shizuru, J., Shiraz, P., Arai, S., Miklos, D., Sidana, S. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2020
  • Impact of proteasome inhibitor vs. IMiD maintenance therapy on outcomes of patients with high-risk multiple myeloma (HRMM). Tam, E., Iberri, D., Liedtke, M., Muffly, L. S., Shiraz, P., Frank, M., Lowsky, R., Rezvani, A., Negrin, R., Meyer, E., Arai, S., Johnston, L. J., Shizuru, J., Weng, W., Miklos, D., Sidana, S. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2020
  • The Current Genomic and Molecular Landscape of Philadelphia-like Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. International journal of molecular sciences Shiraz, P., Payne, K. J., Muffly, L. 2020; 21 (6)

    Abstract

    Philadelphia (Ph)-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a high-risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) characterized by a gene expression profile similar to Ph-positive B-ALL but lacking the BCR-ABL1 translocation. The molecular pathogenesis of Ph-like B-ALL is heterogenous and involves aberrant genomics, receptor overexpression, kinase fusions, and mutations leading to kinase signaling activation, leukemogenic cellular proliferation, and differentiation blockade. Testing for the Ph-like signature, once only a research technique, is now available to the clinical oncologist. The plethora of data pointing to poor outcomes for this ALL subset has triggered investigations into the role of targeted therapies, predominantly involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are showing promising results.

    View details for DOI 10.3390/ijms21062193

    View details for PubMedID 32235787

  • Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Significant Increase in Survival in the Post-Targeted Immunotherapy Era Muffly, L., Arai, S., Johnston, L., Lowsky, R., Meyer, E. H., Miklos, D. B., Negrin, R. S., Rezvani, A., Shiraz, P., Shizuru, J. A., Sidana, S., Weng, W., Cunanan, K. ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC. 2020: S106
  • Regulatory Type 1 T Cell Infusion in Mismatched Related or Unrelated Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) for Hematologic Malignancies Agarwal, R., Bacchetta, R., Bertaina, A., Chen, P., Saini, G., Shiraz, P., Bhatia, N., Roncarolo, M. ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC. 2020: S272–S273
  • Outcomes with autologous stem cell transplant vs. non-transplant therapy in patients 70 years and older with multiple myeloma. Bone marrow transplantation Lemieux, C. n., Muffly, L. S., Rezvani, A. n., Lowsky, R. n., Iberri, D. J., Craig, J. K., Frank, M. J., Johnston, L. J., Liedtke, M. n., Negrin, R. n., Weng, W. K., Meyer, E. n., Shizuru, J. n., Shiraz, P. n., Arai, S. n., Miklos, D. B., Sidana, S. n. 2020

    Abstract

    We evaluated 79 patients with multiple myeloma (MM) ≥70 years referred to our blood and marrow transplant clinic, within 1 year of diagnosis from 2010 to 2019, for consideration of autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). Thirty-eight (48%) of 79 patients underwent ASCT. ASCT was not pursued in 41 (52%) patients due to: patient or physician preference in 80% (n = 33) or ineligibility in 20% (n = 8). Baseline characteristics of patients in the two groups were similar. Median PFS from treatment start amongst patients undergoing ASCT (n = 38) vs. not (n = 41) was 41 months vs. 33 months, p = 0.03. There was no difference in OS, with estimated 5-year OS of 73% vs. 83%, respectively (p = 0.86). Day +100 transplant-related mortality (TRM) was 0%. ASCT was an independent favorable prognostic factor for PFS in multivariate analysis, after accounting for HCT-CI score, performance status, hematologic response, and maintenance. Finally, patients ≥70 years undergoing ASCT had similar PFS compared to a contemporaneous institutional cohort of patients <70 years (n = 631) (median PFS from transplant: 36 vs. 47 months, p = 0.25). In this retrospective analysis, ASCT was associated with low TRM and better PFS in fit older adults with MM compared to non-transplant therapy, with comparable benefits as seen in younger patients.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41409-020-01026-7

    View details for PubMedID 32782351

  • CD22-Directed CAR T-Cell Therapy Induces Complete Remissions in CD19-Directed CAR-Refractory Large B-Cell Lymphoma. Blood Baird, J. H., Frank, M. J., Craig, J. n., Patel, S. n., Spiegel, J. Y., Sahaf, B. n., Oak, J. S., Younes, S. n., Ozawa, M. n., Yang, E. n., Natkunam, Y. n., Tamaresis, J. S., Ehlinger, Z. n., Reynolds, W. D., Arai, S. n., Johnston, L. n., Lowsky, R. n., Meyer, E. n., Negrin, R. S., Rezvani, A. R., Shiraz, P. n., Sidana, S. n., Weng, W. K., Davis, K. L., Ramakrishna, S. n., Schultz, L. n., Mullins, C. D., Jacob, A. P., Kirsch, I. R., Feldman, S. A., Mackall, C. L., Miklos, D. B., Muffly, L. n. 2020

    Abstract

    The prognosis for patients with large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL) progressing after treatment with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy targeting CD19 (CAR19) is poor. We report on the first three consecutive patients with autologous CAR19-refractory LBCL treated with a single infusion of autologous 1×106 CAR+ T-cells/kg targeting CD22 (CAR22) as part of a phase I dose escalation study. CAR22 therapy was relatively well tolerated, without any observed non-hematologic adverse events higher than grade 2. Following infusion, all three patients achieved complete remission, with all responses ongoing at the time of last follow up (mean 7.8 months, range 6-9.3). Circulating CAR22 cells demonstrated robust expansion (peak range 85.4-350 cells/µL), and persisted beyond three months in all patients with continued radiographic responses and corresponding decreases in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) beyond six months post-infusion. Further accrual at a higher dose level in this phase 1 dose-escalation study is ongoing and will explore the role of this therapy in patients who have failed prior CAR T-cell therapies. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04088890).

    View details for DOI 10.1182/blood.2020009432

    View details for PubMedID 33512414

  • Advance Directive Utilization is Associated with Less Aggressive End-of-Life Care in Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation. Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Cappell, K. n., Sundaram, V. n., Park, A. n., Shiraz, P. n., Gupta, R. n., Jenkins, P. n., Periyakoil, V. S., Muffly, L. n. 2018

    Abstract

    Background Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, making advance care planning (ACP) and management especially important in this patient population. A paucity of data exists on the utilization of ACP amongst allogeneic HCT recipients, and the relationship between ACP and intensity of health care utilization in these patients. Methods We performed a retrospective review of patients receiving allogeneic HCT at our institution from 2008 to 2015 who had subsequently died following HCT. Documentation and timing of advance directive (AD) completion were abstracted from the electronic medical record. Outcomes of interest included (a) utilization of intensive care unit level of care (ICU) at (i) any time point following HCT, (ii) within 30 days of death, (iii) within 14 days of death, (b) use of mechanical ventilation at any time point following HCT, and (c) location of death. Univariate logistic regression was performed to explore associations between AD completion and each outcome. Results Of the 1031 patients who received allogeneic HCT during the study period, there were 422 (41%) decedents who are included in the analysis. Forty-four percent had AD documentation prior to death. A majority of patients (69%) indicated that if terminally ill, they did not wish to be subjected to life-prolonging treatment attempts. Race/ethnicity was significantly associated with AD documentation, with Non-Hispanic White patients documenting ADs more frequently (51%) compared to Hispanic (22%) or Asian patients (35%); p= 0.0007. Patients with AD were less likely to utilize the ICU during the transplant course (41% for patients with AD versus 52% of patients without AD; p= 0.03) and also were less likely to receive mechanical ventilation at any point following transplantation (21% versus 37%; p<0.001). AD documentation was also associated with decreased ICU utilization at the end-of-life; relative to patients without AD, patients with AD were more likely to die at home or in hospital as opposed to in the ICU (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.27-0.72).ACP remains underutilized in allogeneic HCT. Adoption of a systematic practice to standardize AD documentation as part of allogeneic HCT planning has the potential to significantly reduce ICU utilization and mechanical ventilation while improving quality of care at end-of-life in HCT recipients.

    View details for PubMedID 29371107

  • Pharmacologic maintenance strategies following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia. Leukemia & lymphoma Lee, C. J., Shiraz, P., Muffly, L. 2017; 58 (3): 516-527

    Abstract

    The use of pharmacologic agents to maintain remission following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a topic of increasing interest and exploration for patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This review details published and ongoing studies focused on post-transplant pharmacologic maintenance for AML. While early phase studies have demonstrated the safety and tolerability of various maintenance approaches following HCT, the results of several ongoing randomized prospective studies will be required to determine the clinical efficacy needed to expand this approach from experimental to standard of care.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/10428194.2016.1205744

    View details for PubMedID 27685315

  • Adoption of Pediatric-Inspired Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Regimens by Adult Oncologists Treating Adolescents and Young Adults: A Population-Based Study CANCER Muffly, L., Lichtensztajn, D., Shiraz, P., Abrahao, R., McNeer, J., Stock, W., Keegan, T., Gomez, S. L. 2017; 123 (1): 122-130

    Abstract

    Studies have demonstrated superior outcomes for adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who are treated using pediatric versus adult therapeutic regimens. To the best of our knowledge, whether adult oncologists in the United States have adopted this approach to ALL in AYA patients is currently unknown. The objective of the current study was to provide a population-based description of ALL treatment patterns in AYA individuals over the past decade.Data regarding AYA patients aged 15 to 39 years and diagnosed with ALL between 2004 and 2014 while living in the Greater Bay Area were obtained from the Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry (GBACR). Treating facilities were designated as pediatric or adult centers; induction treatment regimens were abstracted from registry text data fields.Of 304 patients diagnosed in the GBACR catchment region, complete treatment data were available for 229 (75%). The location of care was identified for 296 patients (97%) treated at 31 unique centers. Approximately 70% of AYA patients received induction therapy at an adult treatment center. All AYA patients who were treated at pediatric centers received pediatric ALL regimens. Among AYA patients treated by adult oncologists with complete treatment data, none received a pediatric regimen before 2008. Between 2008 and 2012, while the US Adult Intergroup C10403 pediatric-inspired ALL protocol was open to accrual, 31% of AYA patients treated by adult oncologists received pediatric regimens. This rate fell to 21% from 2013 through 2014. Adult facilities treating ≥ 2 AYA patients with ALL per year captured in the GBACR were more likely to administer pediatric regimens than lower volume centers (P = .03).As of 2014, only a minority of AYA patients with ALL received pediatric ALL regimens at adult cancer centers. Cancer 2017;122-130. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/cncr.30322

    View details for Web of Science ID 000394719100016

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5161602

  • Rate of Rise of EBV Viral Load By Quantitative PCR after Allogeneic Transplantation Correlates with PTLD Facilitates Timely Institution of Rituximab Muffly, L. S., Shiraz, P., Nguyen, I. T., Brown, J. M. AMER SOC HEMATOLOGY. 2016
  • Adoption of pediatric-inspired acute lymphoblastic leukemia regimens by adult oncologists treating adolescents and young adults: A population-based study. Cancer Muffly, L., Lichtensztajn, D., Shiraz, P., Abrahão, R., McNeer, J., Stock, W., Keegan, T., Gomez, S. L. 2016

    Abstract

    Studies have demonstrated superior outcomes for adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who are treated using pediatric versus adult therapeutic regimens. To the best of our knowledge, whether adult oncologists in the United States have adopted this approach to ALL in AYA patients is currently unknown. The objective of the current study was to provide a population-based description of ALL treatment patterns in AYA individuals over the past decade.Data regarding AYA patients aged 15 to 39 years and diagnosed with ALL between 2004 and 2014 while living in the Greater Bay Area were obtained from the Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry (GBACR). Treating facilities were designated as pediatric or adult centers; induction treatment regimens were abstracted from registry text data fields.Of 304 patients diagnosed in the GBACR catchment region, complete treatment data were available for 229 (75%). The location of care was identified for 296 patients (97%) treated at 31 unique centers. Approximately 70% of AYA patients received induction therapy at an adult treatment center. All AYA patients who were treated at pediatric centers received pediatric ALL regimens. Among AYA patients treated by adult oncologists with complete treatment data, none received a pediatric regimen before 2008. Between 2008 and 2012, while the US Adult Intergroup C10403 pediatric-inspired ALL protocol was open to accrual, 31% of AYA patients treated by adult oncologists received pediatric regimens. This rate fell to 21% from 2013 through 2014. Adult facilities treating ≥ 2 AYA patients with ALL per year captured in the GBACR were more likely to administer pediatric regimens than lower volume centers (P = .03).As of 2014, only a minority of AYA patients with ALL received pediatric ALL regimens at adult cancer centers. Cancer 2017;122-130. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/cncr.30322

    View details for PubMedID 27622953

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5161602