All Publications


  • Use of social media in rare and undiagnosed disease research: a systematic review Miller, E., Flinchum, G., Woodward, A., Halley, M. ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE. 2021: S356-S357
  • Using Technology to Measure Older Adults' Social Networks for Health and Well-Being: A Scoping Review. The Gerontologist Wei, S., Kang, B., Bailey, D. E., Caves, K., Lin, Y., McConnell, E. S., Thurow, M., Woodward, A., Wright-Freeman, K., Xue, T. M., Corazzini, K. N. 2021

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Social networks impact the health and well-being of older adults. Advancements in technology (e.g., digital devices and mHealth) enrich our ability to collect social networks and health data. The purpose of this scoping review was to identify and map the use of technology in measuring older adults' social networks for health and social care.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Joanna Briggs Institute methodology was followed. PubMed (MEDLINE), Sociological Abstracts, SocINDEX, CINAHL, and Web of Science were searched for relevant articles. Conference abstracts and proceedings were searched via Conference Papers Index, the American Sociological Society, and The Gerontological Society of America. Studies published in English from January 2004 to March 2020 that aimed to improve health or social care for older adults and used technology to measure social networks were included. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers using an a priori extraction tool.RESULTS: The majority of the 18 reviewed studies were pilot or simulation research conducted in Europe that focused on older adults living in the community. The various types of technologies used can be categorized as environment-based, person-based, and data-based.DISCUSSION AND IMPLICATIONS: Technology facilitates objective and longitudinal data collection on the social interactions and activities of older adults. The use of technology to measure older adults' social networks, however, is primarily in an exploratory phase. Multidisciplinary collaborations are needed to overcome operational, analytical, and implementation challenges. Future studies should leverage technologies for addressing social isolation and care for older adults, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/geront/gnab039

    View details for PubMedID 33754150

  • Understanding the Associations between Caregiver Characteristics and Cognitive Function of Adults with Cancer: A Scoping Review ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF ONCOLOGY NURSING Yang, Y., Rushton, S., Park, H., Son, H., Woodward, A., Mcconnell, E., Hendrix, C. 2020; 7 (2): 115–28

    Abstract

    Cognitive impairment (CI) is one of symptoms that adults with cancer frequently report. Although there are known factors that contribute to a patient's CI, these factors did not sufficiently explain its variability. Several studies conducted in patients with neurocognitive disorders have reported relationships between patients' cognitive function and caregiver characteristics, which are poorly understood in the context of cancer. This scoping review aims to map the literature on caregiver characteristics associated with CI in adults with cancer. We used the framework proposed by Arksey and O'Malley and PRISMA-Sc. Studies published in English by 2019 were searched through seven electronic databases. All retrieved citations were independently screened and eligibility for inclusion was determined by two independent authors. Ten studies met inclusion for this review with all of them showing significant associations between a patient's cognitive function and caregiver characteristics. Caregiver's mental health was the most commonly associated with a patient's cognitive function followed by family functioning, adaptation to illness, attitude toward disclosure of the illness, burden, coping and resilience, and demographic characteristics. These review findings suggest that enhanced information about CI in relation to caregiver characteristics will eventually provide the foundation for multifocal interventions for patients with impaired cognitive function. This scoping review identified caregiver characteristics that are associated with patients CI. These characteristics should be also assessed when health providers assess and treat CI of adults with cancer.

    View details for DOI 10.4103/apjon.apjon_3_20

    View details for Web of Science ID 000525113600001

    View details for PubMedID 32478128

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7233557

  • Conceptual and theoretical models for cybercivility in education in health professions: a scoping review protocol. JBI evidence synthesis De Gagne, J. C., Woodward, A. n., Koppel, P. D., Park, H. K. 2020; 18 (5): 1019–27

    Abstract

    The objective of this scoping review is to examine conceptual and theoretical models used to educate students in health professions about cybercivility.Civil behavior in cyberspace is an important element of online communications. However, this is challenging to define and teach due to subjectivity and personal bias as to what constitutes cybercivility and cyberincivility. Conceptual models or frameworks are often used to provide guidance when new knowledge and skills need to be integrated into existing professional practice. This study will provide evidence on the development and implementation of curriculum for cybercivility across healthcare professions and its potential benefits in improving interprofessional communication.The review will consider studies that include students of health professions exposed to cyberincivility. This scoping review will include experimental, quasi-experimental and descriptive observational study designs. Dissertations will be considered, but conference abstracts, posters, editorials, commentaries and opinion papers will be excluded. The search will be limited to studies published in English after 2007.The databases to be searched include PubMed (MEDLINE), CINAHL (via EBSCO), Education Resources Information Center (ERIC), Embase, PsycINFO (via EBSCO), Education Full Text (H.W. Wilson) and gray literature databases such as the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global database, OpenGrey, EThOS and PaperFirst. After screening of abstracts/titles for inclusion by two independent researchers, full-text studies will be screened and reasons for exclusion will be provided. Data will be extracted from the papers included in the review by two independent researchers using the data extraction instrument. NVivo 12 will be used to analyze and report the results.

    View details for DOI 10.11124/JBISRIR-D-19-00065

    View details for PubMedID 32813354

  • Conceptual and theoretical models for cybercivility in health professions education: a scoping review protocol. JBI database of systematic reviews and implementation reports De Gagne, J. C., Woodward, A., Koppel, P. D., Park, H. K. 2019

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this scoping review is to examine conceptual and theoretical models used to educate health professions students about cybercivility.INTRODUCTION: Civil behavior in cyberspace is an important element of online communications. However, this is challenging to define and teach due to subjectivity and personal bias as to what constitutes cybercivility and cyberincivility. Conceptual models or frameworks are often used to provide guidance when new knowledge and skills need to be integrated into existing professional practice. This study will provide evidence on the development and implementation of curriculum for cybercivility across healthcare professions and its potential benefits in improving interprofessional communication.INCLUSION CRITERIA: The review will consider studies that include students of health professions exposed to cyberincivility. This scoping review will include experimental, quasi-experimental and descriptive observational study designs. Dissertations will be considered, but conference abstracts, posters, editorials, commentaries and opinion papers will be excluded. The search will be limited to studies published in English after 2007.METHODS: The databases to be searched include PubMed (MEDLINE), CINAHL (via EBSCO), Education Resources Information Center (ERIC), Embase, PsycINFO (via EBSCO), Education Full Text (H.W. Wilson) and gray literature databases such as the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global database, OpenGrey, EThOS and PaperFirst. After screening of abstracts/titles for inclusion by two independent researchers, full-text studies will be screened and reasons for exclusion will be provided. Data will be extracted from the papers included in the review by two independent researchers using the data extraction instrument. NVivo 12 will be used to analyze and report the results.

    View details for DOI 10.11124/JBISRIR-D-19-00065

    View details for PubMedID 31688360

  • Microlearning in Health Professions Education: Scoping Review. JMIR medical education De Gagne, J. C., Park, H. K., Hall, K., Woodward, A., Yamane, S., Kim, S. S. 2019; 5 (2): e13997

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Microlearning, the acquisition of knowledge or skills in the form of small units, is endorsed by health professions educators as a means of facilitating student learning, training, and continuing education, but it is difficult to define in terms of its features and outcomes.OBJECTIVE: This review aimed to conduct a systematic search of the literature on microlearning in health professions education to identify key concepts, characterize microlearning as an educational strategy, and evaluate pedagogical outcomes experienced by health professions students.METHODS: A scoping review was performed using the bibliographic databases PubMed (MEDLINE), CINAHL, Education Resources Information Center, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Education Full Text (HW Wilson), and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global. A combination of keywords and subject headings related to microlearning, electronic learning, or just-in-time learning combined with health professions education was used. No date limits were placed on the search, but inclusion was limited to materials published in English. Pedagogical outcomes were evaluated according to the 4-level Kirkpatrick model.RESULTS: A total of 3096 references were retrieved, of which 17 articles were selected after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Articles that met the criteria were published between 2011 and 2018, and their authors were from a range of countries, including the United States, China, India, Australia, Canada, Iran, Netherlands, Taiwan, and the United Kingdom. The 17 studies reviewed included various health-related disciplines, such as medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, and allied health. Although microlearning appeared in a variety of subject areas, different technologies, such as podcast, short messaging service, microblogging, and social networking service, were also used. On the basis of Buchem and Hamelmann's 10 microlearning concepts, each study satisfied at least 40% of the characteristics, whereas all studies featured concepts of maximum time spent less than 15 min as well as content aggregation. According to our assessment of each article using the Kirkpatrick model, 94% (16/17) assessed student reactions to the microlearning (level 1), 82% (14/17) evaluated knowledge or skill acquisition (level 2), 29% (5/17) measured the effect of the microlearning on student behavior (level 3), and no studies were found at the highest level.CONCLUSIONS: Microlearning as an educational strategy has demonstrated a positive effect on the knowledge and confidence of health professions students in performing procedures, retaining knowledge, studying, and engaging in collaborative learning. However, downsides to microlearning include pedagogical discomfort, technology inequalities, and privacy concerns. Future research should look at higher-level outcomes, including benefits to patients or practice changes. The findings of this scoping review will inform education researchers, faculty, and academic administrators on the application of microlearning, pinpoint gaps in the literature, and help identify opportunities for instructional designers and subject matter experts to improve course content in didactic and clinical settings.

    View details for DOI 10.2196/13997

    View details for PubMedID 31339105

  • Microlearning in health professions education: a scoping review protocol. JBI database of systematic reviews and implementation reports De Gagne, J. C., Woodward, A., Park, H. K., Sun, H., Yamane, S. S. 2019; 17 (6): 1018–25

    Abstract

    REVIEW QUESTIONS:.

    View details for DOI 10.11124/JBISRIR-2017-003884

    View details for PubMedID 30489350