Bio


Andrea Kussman, MD is a board-certified Family Medicine physician with a Certificate of Added Qualification (CAQ) in Sports Medicine. She is faculty in the Department of Orthopaedics, where she specializes in the non-surgical treatment of orthopedic injuries, management of medical issues in athletes, and Primary Care.

Dr. Kussman earned her MD from the University of Michigan Medical School, and completed her Family Medicine Residency at UCLA. After residency she was selected to be the Chief Resident at UCLA. Dr. Kussman then completed her Sports Medicine Fellowship at UCLA, where she served as a Team Physician for UCLA Intercollegiate Athletics and for Santa Monica High School.

Dr. Kussman cares for Stanford University athletes at the Lacob Family Sports Medicine Clinic in the Arrillaga Center for Sports and Recreation, and is the Head Team Physician for Stanford University Women's Volleyball, Beach Volleyball, Lacrosse, Softball, Synchronized Swimming, Men's Crew, Women's Crew, and Lightweight Crew. Dr. Kussman also enjoys caring for members of the community at her Redwood City Orthopaedic Clinic, where she sees patients of all ages. From weekend warriors to competitive athletes, Dr. Kussman enjoys helping her patients recover, return to their activities, and meet their goals.

Dr. Kussman provides teaching to the Stanford University Sports Medicine Fellowship Program. She is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM), the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM), and the Female Athlete Triad Coalition.

In her spare time, Dr. Kussman enjoys camping, hiking, running, playing soccer, watching sports, trying out new sports, reading, and spending time with her husband and their puppy.

Clinical Focus


  • Primary Care Sports Medicine
  • Family Medicine

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: American Board of Family Medicine, Sports Medicine (2017)
  • Fellowship: UCLA David Geffen School Of Medicine Registrar (2017) CA
  • Residency: UCLA David Geffen School Of Medicine Registrar (2016) CA
  • Residency: UCLA David Geffen School Of Medicine Registrar (2015) CA
  • Board Certification: American Board of Family Medicine, Family Medicine (2015)
  • Medical Education: University of Michigan Medical School (2012) MI

2020-21 Courses


Graduate and Fellowship Programs


  • Sports Medicine (Fellowship Program)

All Publications


  • Dietary Supplement Use According to Sex and Triad Risk Factors in Collegiate Endurance Runners. Journal of strength and conditioning research Barrack, M., Fredericson, M., Dizon, F., Tenforde, A., Kim, B., Kraus, E., Kussman, A., Singh, S., Nattiv, A. 2020

    Abstract

    Barrack, MT, Fredericson, M, Dizon, F, Tenforde, AS, Kim, BY, Kraus, E, Kussman, A, Singh, S, and Nattiv, A. Dietary supplement use according to sex and Triad risk factors in collegiate endurance runners. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2020-This cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence in the use of dietary supplements among elite collegiate runners among 2 NCAA Division I cross-country teams. At the start of each season from 2015 to 2017, male and female endurance runners were recruited to complete baseline study measures; the final sample included 135 (male n = 65, female n = 70) runners. Runners completed a health survey, web-based nutrition survey, and Triad risk assessment. The prevalence of dietary supplement use and Triad risk factors, including disordered eating, low bone mass, amenorrhea (in women), low body mass index, and stress fracture history, was assessed. A total of 78.5% (n = 106) runners reported taking 1 or more supplements on ≥4 days per week over the past month, 48% (n = 65) reported use of ≥3 supplements. Products used with highest frequency included multivitamin/minerals 46.7% (n = 63), iron 46.7% (n = 63), vitamin D 34.1% (n = 46), and calcium 33.3% (n = 45). More women, compared with men, used iron (61.4 vs. 30.8%, p < 0.001) and calcium (41.4 vs. 24.6%, p = 0.04); men exhibited higher use of amino acids and beta-alanine (6.2 vs. 0%, p = 0.04). Runners with bone stress injury (BSI) history, vs. no previous BSI, reported more frequent use of ≥3 supplements (61.5 vs. 32.8%, p = 0.001), vitamin D (49.2 vs. 19.4%, p < 0.001), and calcium (47.7 vs. 19.4%, p = 0.001). Low bone mineral density was also associated with higher use of vitamin D and calcium. Most runners reported regular use of 1 or more supplements, with patterns of use varying based on sex, history of BSI, and bone mass.

    View details for DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000003848

    View details for PubMedID 33278271

  • Food Accessibility And Eating Patterns In Elite Collegiate Endurance Runners Agans, D., Barrack, M., Fredericson, M., Kraus, E., Kussman, A., Gravani, K., Miller, B., Papanos, L., Roche, M., Hernandez, C., Grohmann, E., Brotman, C., Nattiv, A. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2020: 757
  • Dietary Intake Patterns And Risk Of Energy Deficiency In Ncaa Endurance Athletes Hernandez, C., Fredericson, M., Nattiv, A., Kraus, E., Kussman, A., Gravani, K., Miller, B., Papanos, L., Roche, M., Agans, D., Grohmann, E., Brotman, C., Barrack, M. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2020: 753
  • Bone stress injuries in male distance runners: higher modified Female Athlete Triad Cumulative Risk Assessment scores predict increased rates of injury BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE Kraus, E., Tenforde, A. S., Nattiv, A., Sainani, K. L., Kussman, A., Deakins-Roche, M., Singh, S., Kim, B., Barrack, M. T., Fredericson, M. 2019; 53 (4): 237–42
  • Bone stress injuries in male distance runners: higher modified Female Athlete Triad Cumulative Risk Assessment scores predict increased rates of injury. British journal of sports medicine Kraus, E., Tenforde, A. S., Nattiv, A., Sainani, K. L., Kussman, A., Deakins-Roche, M., Singh, S., Kim, B. Y., Barrack, M. T., Fredericson, M. 2018

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES: Bone stress injuries (BSI) are common in runners of both sexes. The purpose of this study was to determine if a modified Female Athlete Triad Cumulative Risk Assessment tool would predict BSI in male distance runners.METHODS: 156 male runners at two collegiate programmes were studied using mixed retrospective and prospective design for a total of 7years. Point values were assigned using risk assessment categories including low energy availability, low body mass index (BMI), low bone mineral density (BMD) and prior BSI. The outcome was subsequent development of BSI. Statistical models used a mixed effects Poisson regression model with p<0.05 as threshold for significance. Two regression analyses were performed: (1) baseline risk factors as the independent variable; and (2) annual change in risk factors (longitudinal data) as the independent variable.RESULTS: 42/156 runners (27%) sustained 61 BSIs over an average 1.9 years of follow-up. In the baseline risk factor model, each 1 point increase in prior BSI score was associated with a 57% increased risk for prospective BSI (p=0.0042) and each 1 point increase in cumulative risk score was associated with a 37% increase in prospective BSI risk (p=0.0079). In the longitudinal model, each 1 point increase in cumulative risk score was associated with a 27% increase in prospective BSI risk (p=0.05). BMI (rate ratio (RR)=1.91, p=0.11) and BMD (RR=1.58, p=0.19) risk scores were not associated with BSI.CONCLUSION: A modified cumulative risk assessment tool may help identify male runners at elevated risk for BSI. Identifying risk factors may guide treatment and prevention strategies.

    View details for PubMedID 30580252

  • Youth Multi-sport Participation Is Associated With Higher Bone Mineral Density In Female Collegiate Distance Runners Miller, E., Fredericson, M., Kussman, A., Krauss, E., Singh, S., Deakins-Roche, M., Kim, B., Tenforde, A., Sainani, K., Nattiv, A. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2018: 490
  • Nutrition Goals Prioritized By Elite Endurance Runners Undergoing A Nutrition Education Intervention Barrack, M., Fredericson, M., Adam, T. S., Kraus, E., Kim, B., Singh, S., Kussman, A., Gravani, K., Ansari, Y., Miller, B., Nattiv, A. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2017: 852
  • Preliminary Results from a Prospective Study Using the Female Athlete Triad Cumulative Risk Assessment Kraus, E., Nattiv, A., Tenforde, A., Kussman, A., Barrack, M., Kim, B., Deakins-Roche, M., Mistra, N., Singh, S., Fredericson, M. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2017: 1098
  • Poster 155 Higher Cumulative Risk Assessment Scores Are Associated with Delayed Return to Play in Division I Collegiate Distance Runners. PM & R : the journal of injury, function, and rehabilitation Kraus, E. A., Kim, B., Nattiv, A., Tenforde, A., Barrack, M., Deakins-Roche, M., Kussman, A., Singh, S., Morkos, J., Fredericson, M. 2016; 8 (9S): S212-S213

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.pmrj.2016.07.196

    View details for PubMedID 27672919

  • 2016 update on eating disorders in athletes: A comprehensive narrative review with a focus on clinical assessment and management BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE Joy, E., Kussman, A., Nattiv, A. 2016; 50 (3): 154-?

    Abstract

    Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, can have devastating effects on both the health and performance of athletes. Compared to non-athletes, both female and male athletes are at higher risk of developing an eating disorder. This is especially true for athletes participating in sports where low body weight or leanness confers a competitive advantage. Screening for disordered eating behaviours, eating disorders and for related health consequences should be a standard component of preparticipation examinations, and team physicians should be knowledgeable of the updated diagnostic criteria for eating disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-V. Athletes with eating disorders should undergo thorough evaluation and treatment by an experienced multidisciplinary team. Team physicians play a critical role in decision-making on clearance for participation and return to play. Using evidence-based guidelines for clearance and return to play encourages transparency and accountability between the sports medicine care team and the athlete. Efforts to prevent eating disorders should be aimed at athletes, coaches, parents and athletic administrators, and focused on expanding knowledge of healthy nutrition in support of sport performance and health.

    View details for DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2015-095735

    View details for Web of Science ID 000369998100010

    View details for PubMedID 26782763

  • Distribution of Bone Stress Injuries in Elite Male and Female Collegiate Runners Tenforde, A. S., Nattiv, A., Barrack, M., Kraus, E., Kim, B., Kussman, A., Singh, S., Fredericson, M. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2015: 905