Bio


Austen Brooks Casey, PhD, is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine. He originates from western North Carolina, and has had a long-standing interest in drug discovery for major depression and schizophrenia, which was invigorated by initial coursework in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Austen has performed research in the medicinal chemistry and pharmacology of novel ligands targeting serotonergic G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for neuropsychiatric indications including autism and psychosis. Currently, he is investigating neural circuits activated by psychedelic drugs, with the long-term goal of using modern techniques in neuroscience to complement drug design efforts toward the development of novel antidepressant and antipsychotic medications.

Professional Education


  • PhD, Northeastern University, Medicinal Chemistry (2021)
  • BS, Warren Wilson College, Chemistry: concentration in Biochemistry (2016)
  • AA, Tri-County Community College (2014)

Stanford Advisors


All Publications


  • A new class of serotonin 5-HT2A/5-HT2C receptor inverse agonists: Synthesis, molecular modeling, in vitro and in vivo pharmacology of novel 2-aminotetralins British Journal of Pharacology Casey, A. B., Mukherjee, M., McGlynn, R. P., Cui, M., Kohut, S. J., Booth, R. G. 2021

    View details for DOI 10.1111/bph.15756

  • (S)-5-(2 '-Fluorophenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-amine, a Serotonin Receptor Modulator, Possesses Anticonvulsant, Prosocial, and Anxiolytic-like Properties in an Fmr1 Knockout Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder ACS PHARMACOLOGY & TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE Armstrong, J. L., Casey, A. B., Saraf, T. S., Mukherjee, M., Booth, R. G., Canal, C. E. 2020; 3 (3): 509-523

    Abstract

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by intellectual disabilities and a plethora of neuropsychiatric symptoms. FXS is the leading monogenic cause of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which is defined clinically by repetitive and/or restrictive patterns of behavior and social communication deficits. Epilepsy and anxiety are also common in FXS and ASD. Serotonergic neurons directly innervate and modulate the activity of neurobiological circuits altered in both disorders, providing a rationale for investigating serotonin receptors (5-HTRs) as targets for FXS and ASD drug discovery. Previously we unveiled an orally active aminotetralin, (S)-5-(2'-fluorophenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-amine (FPT), that exhibits partial agonist activity at 5-HT1ARs, 5-HT2CRs, and 5-HT7Rs and that reduces repetitive behaviors and increases social approach behavior in wild-type mice. Here we report that in an Fmr1 knockout mouse model of FXS and ASD, FPT is prophylactic for audiogenic seizures. No FPT-treated mice displayed audiogenic seizures, compared to 73% of vehicle-treated mice. FPT also exhibits anxiolytic-like effects in several assays and increases social interactions in both Fmr1 knockout and wild-type mice. Furthermore, FPT increases c-Fos expression in the basolateral amygdala, which is a preclinical effect produced by anxiolytic medications. Receptor pharmacology assays show that FPT binds competitively and possesses rapid association and dissociation kinetics at 5-HT1ARs and 5-HT7Rs, yet has slow association and rapid dissociation kinetics at 5-HT2CRs. Finally, we reassessed and report FPT's affinity and function at 5-HT1ARs, 5-HT2CRs, and 5-HT7Rs. Collectively, these observations provide mounting support for further development of FPT as a pharmacotherapy for common neuropsychiatric symptoms in FXS and ASD.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/acsptsci.9b00101

    View details for Web of Science ID 000604267300012

    View details for PubMedID 32566916

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7296548

  • Synthesis of novel 5-substituted-2-aminotetralin analogs: 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 G protein-coupled receptor affinity, 3D-QSAR and molecular modeling BIOORGANIC & MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY Perry, C. K., Casey, A. B., Felsing, D. E., Vemula, R., Zaka, M., Herrington, N. B., Cui, M., Kellogg, G. E., Canal, C. E., Booth, R. G. 2020; 28 (3): 115262

    Abstract

    The serotonin 5-HT7 G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) is a proposed pharmacotherapeutic target for a variety of central and peripheral indications, albeit, there are no approved drugs selective for binding 5-HT7. We previously reported that a lead analog based on the 5-substituted-N,N-disubstituted-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-amine (5-substituted-2-aminotetralin, 5-SAT) scaffold binds with high affinity at the 5-HT7 GPCR, and can treat symptoms of autism in mouse models; subsequently, the lead was found to have high affinity at the 5-HT1A GPCR. Herein, we report the synthesis of novel 5-SAT analogs to develop a 3-dimensional quantitative structure-affinity relationship (3D-QSAR) at the human 5-HT7 receptor for comparison with similar studies at the highly homologous 5-HT1A receptor. We report 35 new 5-SAT ligands, some with very high affinity (Ki ≤ 1 nM) and stereoselectivity at 5-HT7 + or 5-HT1A receptors, several with modest selectivity (up to 12-fold) for binding at 5-HT7, and, several ligands with high selectivity (up to 40-fold) at the 5-HT1A receptor. 3D-QSAR results indicate that steric extensions at the C(5)-position improve selectivity for the 5-HT7 over 5-HT1A receptor, while steric and hydrophobic extensions at the chiral C(2)-amino position impart 5-HT1A selectivity. In silico receptor homology modeling studies, supplemented with molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy calculations, were used to rationalize experimentally-determined receptor selectivity and stereoselective affinity results. The data from these studies indicate that the 5-SAT chemotype, previously shown to be safe and efficacious in rodent paradigms of neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, is amenable to structural modification to optimize affinity at serotonin 5-HT7 vs. 5-HT1A GPCRs, as may be required for successful clinical translation.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.bmc.2019.115262

    View details for Web of Science ID 000507466200009

    View details for PubMedID 31882369

  • Classics in Chemical Neuroscience: Aripiprazole ACS CHEMICAL NEUROSCIENCE Casey, A. B., Canal, C. E. 2017; 8 (6): 1135-1146

    Abstract

    Aripiprazole was the first antipsychotic developed to possess agonist properties at dopamine D2 autoreceptors, a groundbreaking strategy that presented a new vista for schizophrenia drug discovery. The dopamine D2 receptor is the crucial target of all extant antipsychotics, and all developed prior to aripiprazole were D2 receptor antagonists. Extensive blockade of these receptors, however, typically produces extrapyramidal (movement) side effects, which plagued first-generation antipsychotics, such as haloperidol. Second-generation antipsychotics, such as clozapine, with unique polypharmacology and D2 receptor binding kinetics, have significantly lower risk of movement side effects but can cause myriad additional ones, such as severe weight gain and metabolic dysfunction. Aripiprazole's polypharmacology, characterized by its unique agonist activity at dopamine D2 and D3 and serotonin 5-HT1A receptors, as well as antagonist activity at serotonin 5-HT2A receptors, translates to successful reduction of positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia, while also mitigating risk of weight gain and movement side effects. New observations, however, link aripiprazole to compulsive behaviors in a small group of patients, an unusual side effect for antipsychotics. In this review, we discuss the chemical synthesis, pharmacology, pharmacogenomics, drug metabolism, and adverse events of aripiprazole, and we present a current understanding of aripiprazole's neurotherapeutic mechanisms, as well as the history and importance of aripiprazole to neuroscience.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/acschemneuro.7b00087

    View details for Web of Science ID 000404098100004

    View details for PubMedID 28368577

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5495458