Clinical Focus


  • Diagnostic Radiology

Professional Education


  • Fellowship: Stanford University Neuroradiology Fellowship (2021) CA
  • Board Certification: American Board of Radiology, Diagnostic Radiology (2019)
  • Fellowship: Massachusetts General Hospital Neuroradiology Fellowship (2019) MA
  • Residency: Massachusetts General Hospital Radiology Residency (2018) MA
  • Internship: MetroWest Medical Center Transitional Year (2014) MA
  • Medical Education: Medical University Innsbruck (2009) Austria

All Publications


  • A case of recurrent aneurysm resulting from dual antiplatelet plus anticoagulation after confirmed aneurysm closure following coil-assisted flow diversion. Radiology case reports Geisbush, T. R., Pulli, B., Wolman, D. N., Pendharkar, A. V., Telischak, N. A. 2022; 17 (11): 4075-4078

    Abstract

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is a management cornerstone for intracranial aneurysms treated with flow diversion. However, combined dual antiplatelet plus anticoagulation (triple therapy) can be indicated in some patients with important associated risks. Here we present the case of a 72-year-old woman with prior history of subarachnoid hemorrhage who was started on triple therapy (enoxaparin and DAPT) following successful flow diversion of an enlarging but unruptured left fetal posterior communicating artery aneurysm. Her post-procedural course was complicated by in-stent thrombosis in the setting of a missed ticagrelor dose and subsequent development of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. An early follow-up angiogram confirmed occlusion of the aneurysm. However, after initiation of triple therapy, the aneurysm partially recanalized and her symptoms recurred. Subsequent discontinuation of enoxaparin lead to prompt aneurysm re-occlusion. To our knowledge, this is the first reported instance of confirmed intra-aneurysmal thrombolysis in a successfully treated aneurysm after triple therapy initiation.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.radcr.2022.07.091

    View details for PubMedID 36065245

  • Computed Tomography-Based Imaging Algorithms for Patient Selection in Acute Ischemic Stroke. Neuroimaging clinics of North America Pulli, B., Heit, J. J., Wintermark, M. 2021; 31 (2): 235–50

    Abstract

    Computed tomography remains the most widely used imaging modality for evaluating patients with acute ischemic stroke. Landmark trials have used computed tomography imaging to select patients for intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular treatment. This review summarizes the most important acute ischemic stroke trials, provides an outlook of ongoing studies, and proposes possible image algorithms for patient selection. Although evaluation with anatomic computed tomography imaging techniques is sufficient in early window patients, more advanced imaging techniques should be used beyond 6hours from symptoms onset to quantify the ischemic core and evaluate for the salvageable penumbra.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.nic.2020.12.002

    View details for PubMedID 33902877

  • Intraoperative Neuromonitoring for Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation Embolization: A Propensity-Score Matched Retrospective Database Study. Cureus Feng, A. Y., Sussman, E. S., Jin, M. C., Wong, S., Lopez, J., Pulli, B., Heit, J. J., Telischak, N. 2021; 13 (1): e12946

    Abstract

    Introduction The treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) may result in neurologic morbidity, particularly when an AVM is located in or adjacent to eloquent brain regions. Intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring (IONM) may be utilized to reduce the risk of iatrogenic injury during endovascular AVM embolization; however, IONM for endovascular AVM embolization is not ubiquitously the standard of care. Methods Admissions for AVM embolization were assessed from the IBM MarketScan Commercial and Medicare Supplemental databases (IBM Watson Health, Somers, NY). Inclusion criterion for patients was continuous enrollment six months before and after the index encounter. The use of IONM and presence of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) were noted. Propensity-score matched cohorts with and without IONM were generated to minimize bias between treatment groups (adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities). Results From 2007 to 2016, there were 16,279 patients diagnosed with cerebral AVM in the MarketScan database. Embolized patients were stratified into IONM and non-IONM cohorts; there were 357 patients in the IONM cohort and 1775 patients in the non-IONM cohort. Provider types were significantly different between cohorts (p<0.005). Unruptured AVMs were significantly more likely to be embolized with adjunctive IONM (17.7%) compared to ruptured AVMs (7.9%) (p<0.005). After balancing for baseline comorbidities, there were 266 patients in the IONM cohort, and 1347 patients in the non-IONM cohort. Among unruptured AVM patients, IONM was linked to a significantly shorter length of stay (2.72 versus 4.92 days; p<0.005), significantly lower rates of complications within 30 days of discharge (0.00% versus 1.88%; p=0.038), and significantly lower total payment ($40,179 versus $50,844; p<0.0001). Conclusion Endovascular embolization for unruptured AVMs performed with adjunctive IONM was associated with shorter length of stay, lower complication rates, and hospitalization costs.

    View details for DOI 10.7759/cureus.12946

    View details for PubMedID 33654622

  • The Promise of Dual-Energy CT in Stroke and Neurovascular Imaging. World neurosurgery Wolman, D. N., Pulli, B. n., Heit, J. J. 2021; 146: 379–80

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.wneu.2020.12.003

    View details for PubMedID 33607724

  • Efficacy and safety of embolization of dural arteriovenous fistulas via the ophthalmic artery. Interventional neuroradiology : journal of peritherapeutic neuroradiology, surgical procedures and related neurosciences Mayercik, V. A., Sussman, E. S., Pulli, B., Dodd, R. L., Do, H. M., Telischak, N. A., Marks, M. P., Steinberg, G. K., Chang, S. D., Heit, J. J. 2020: 1591019920969270

    Abstract

    INTRODUCTION: Dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVF) are vascular lesions with arteriovenous shunting that may be treated with surgical obliteration or endovascular embolization. Some DAVF, such as anterior cranial fossa DAVF (AC-DAVF) derive their arterial supply from ophthalmic artery branches in nearly all cases, and trans-arterial embolization carries a risk of vision loss. We determined the efficacy and safety of trans-ophthalmic artery embolization of DAVF.MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of all patients with DAVF treated by trans-ophthalmic artery embolization from 2012 to 2020. Primary outcome was angiographic cure of the DAVF. Secondary outcomes included vision loss, visual impairment, orbital cranial nerve injury, stroke, modified Rankin Scale at 90-days, and mortality.RESULTS: 12 patients met inclusion criteria (9 males; 3 females). 10 patients had AC-DAVF. Patient age was 59.7±9.5 (mean±SD) years. Patients presented with intracranial hemorrhage (4 patients), headache (4 patients), amaurosis fugax (1 patients), or were incidentally discovered (2 patients). DAVF Cognard grades were: II (1 patient), III (6 patients), and IV (5 patients). DAVF were embolized with Onyx (10 patients), nBCA glue (1 patient), and a combination of coils and Onyx (1 patient). DAVF cure was achieved in 11 patients (92%). No patients experienced vision loss, death, or permanent disability. One patient experienced a minor complication of blurry vision attributed to posterior ischemic optic neuropathy. 90-day mRS was 0 (10 patients) and 1 (2 patients).CONCLUSIONS: Trans-ophthalmic artery embolization is an effective and safe treatment for DAVF.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/1591019920969270

    View details for PubMedID 33106085

  • Dual antiplatelet therapy after carotid artery stenting: trends and outcomes in a large national database. Journal of neurointerventional surgery Sussman, E. S., Jin, M. n., Pendharkar, A. V., Pulli, B. n., Feng, A. n., Heit, J. J., Telischak, N. A. 2020

    Abstract

    While dual antiplatelet therapy (dAPT) is standard of care following carotid artery stenting (CAS), the optimal dAPT regimen and duration has not been established.We canvassed a large national database (IBM MarketScan) to identify patients receiving carotid endarterectomy (CEA) or CAS for treatment of ischemic stroke or carotid artery stenosis from 2007 to 2016. We performed univariable and multivariable regression methods to evaluate the impact of covariates on post-CAS stroke-free survival, including post-discharge antiplatelet therapy.A total of 79 084 patients diagnosed with ischemic stroke or carotid stenosis received CEA (71 178; 90.0%) or CAS (7906; 10.0%). After adjusting for covariates, <180 days prescribed post-CAS P2Y12-inhibition was associated with increased risk for stroke (<90 prescribed days HR=1.421, 95% CI 1.038 to 1.946; 90-179 prescribed days HR=1.484, 95% CI 1.045 to 2.106). The incidence of hemorrhagic complications was higher during the period of prescribed P2Y12-inhibition (1.16% per person-month vs 0.49% per person-month after discontinuation, P<0.001). The rate of extracranial hemorrhage was nearly six-fold higher while on dAPT (6.50% per patient-month vs 1.16% per patient-month, P<0.001), and there was a trend towards higher rate of intracranial hemorrhage that did not reach statistical significance (5.09% per patient-month vs 3.69% per patient-month, P=0.0556). Later hemorrhagic events beyond 30 days post-CAS were significantly more likely to be extracranial (P=0.028).Increased duration of post-CAS dAPT is associated with lower rates of readmissions for stroke, and with increased risk of hemorrhagic complications, particularly extracranial hemorrhage. The potential benefit of prolonging dAPT with regard to ischemic complications must be balanced with the corresponding increased risk of predominantly extracranial hemorrhagic complications.

    View details for DOI 10.1136/neurintsurg-2020-016008

    View details for PubMedID 32414894

  • Initial experience with the Scepter Mini dual-lumen balloon for transophthalmic artery embolization of anterior cranial fossa dural arteriovenous fistulae. Journal of neurointerventional surgery Pulli, B. n., Sussman, E. S., Mayercik, V. n., Steinberg, G. K., Do, H. M., Heit, J. J. 2020

    Abstract

    Precise delivery of liquid embolic agents (LEAs) remains a challenge in the endovascular treatment of dural arteriovenous fistulae (dAVFs) and cerebral arteriovenous malformations (cAVMs). Despite significant advances in the past decade, LEA reflux and catheter navigability remain shortcomings of current endovascular technology, particularly in small and tortuous arteries. The Scepter Mini dual-lumen balloon microcatheter aims to address these issues by decreasing the distal catheter profile (1.6 French) while allowing for a small (2.2 mm diameter) balloon at its tip.We report our initial experience with the Scepter Mini in two patients with anterior cranial fossa dAVFs that were treated with transophthalmic artery embolization.In both patients, the Scepter Mini catheter was able to be safely advanced into the distal ophthalmic artery close to the fistula site, and several centimeters past the origins of the central retinal and posterior ciliary arteries. A single Onyx injection without any reflux resulted in angiographic cure of the dAVF in both cases, and neither patient suffered any vision loss.These initial experiences suggest that the Scepter Mini represents a significant advance in the endovascular treatment of dAVFs and cAVMs and will allow for safer and more efficacious delivery of LEAs into smaller and more distal arteries while diminishing the risk of LEA reflux.

    View details for DOI 10.1136/neurintsurg-2020-016013

    View details for PubMedID 32434799

  • Combined adult neurogenesis and BDNF mimic exercise effects on cognition in an Alzheimer's mouse model SCIENCE Choi, S., Bylykbashi, E., Chatila, Z. K., Lee, S. W., Pulli, B., Clemenson, G. D., Kim, E., Rompala, A., Oram, M. K., Asselin, C., Aronson, J., Zhang, C., Miller, S. J., Lesinski, A., Chen, J. W., Kim, D., van Praag, H., Spiegelman, B. M., Gage, F. H., Tanzi, R. E. 2018; 361 (6406): 991-+

    Abstract

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) is impaired before the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. We found that exercise provided cognitive benefit to 5×FAD mice, a mouse model of AD, by inducing AHN and elevating levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Neither stimulation of AHN alone, nor exercise, in the absence of increased AHN, ameliorated cognition. We successfully mimicked the beneficial effects of exercise on AD mice by genetically and pharmacologically inducing AHN in combination with elevating BDNF levels. Suppressing AHN later led to worsened cognitive performance and loss of preexisting dentate neurons. Thus, pharmacological mimetics of exercise, enhancing AHN and elevating BDNF levels, may improve cognition in AD. Furthermore, applied at early stages of AD, these mimetics may protect against subsequent neuronal cell death.

    View details for DOI 10.1126/science.aan8821

    View details for Web of Science ID 000443892700038

    View details for PubMedID 30190379