Graduate School of Education


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  • Alexander Feliciano Mejía

    Alexander Feliciano Mejía

    Ph.D. Student in Education, admitted Autumn 2017

    BioAlex Mejía (he/him/they/them) is a doctoral candidate in the Educational Linguistics and Race, Inequality, and Language in Education (RILE) programs at Stanford University's Graduate School of Education. His research interests are centered on language, identity, social interaction, immigration/diaspora, racialization, and labor/capital. His dissertation examines processes of diasporization, proletarianization, and language socialization among Central American immigrant youth. Through an analysis of ethnographic and interactional data, he examines how youth enact and experience language development and identity formation across workplace and school-based settings.

  • Melissa Mesinas

    Melissa Mesinas

    Ph.D. Student in Education, admitted Autumn 2015
    Ph.D. Minor, Psychology
    SU Student - Summer, GSE Dean's Office Operations

    BioMelissa is a Ph.D. candidate in the Graduate School of Education in the Developmental and Psychological Sciences (DAPS) program. She received her B.A. in Psychology and Hispanic Studies from Scripps College in 2012. After receiving her undergraduate degree, Melissa worked for her alma mater in the Offices of Admissions and Student Affairs as she led the First-Generation at Scripps program. She then went on to Puno, Peru on a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship where she conducted research focused on the educational experiences of Aymara and Quechua communities. Additionally, Melissa has conducted cross-cultural research on Indigenous Mexican communities living in the United States. During this time, Melissa realized her passion lay in community-based outreach and research. Her research interests center on the cultural practices immigrant communities maintain throughout generations and specifically examines its impact on learning, development, and well-being of youth. She is a recipient of the Stanford Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education (EDGE) Doctoral Fellowship, Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship, and the Gates Millennium Scholarship.

  • Debra Meyerson

    Debra Meyerson

    Adjunct Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn addition to continued work on scaling in charter schools, prompted by her stroke in 2010, Debra is now initiating research into the experience of stroke survivors in the rehabilitation process. Specifically, she plans to explore the impact of gender and socioeconomic background on the rehabilitation process and the impact of the process on a survivor's sense of identity. To do so she plans conduct qualitative interviews with survivors, professional caregivers -- physical, occupational and speech therapists -- and caregiving family and friends.

  • John Mitchell

    John Mitchell

    Mary and Gordon Crary Family Professor in the School of Engineering, and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Education

    BioJohn Mitchell is the Mary and Gordon Crary Family Professor, professor of computer science, and by courtesy professor of electrical engineering and professor of education. He was previously appointed as Stanford Vice Provost for Online Learning (2012-2015) and Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning (2015-2018). His team worked with more than 500 Stanford faculty members and instructors on over 1,000 online projects for campus or public audiences and organized the Year of Learning to envision the future of teaching and learning at Stanford and beyond. As co-director of the Lytics Lab and Carta Lab, he worked to improve educational outcomes through data-driven research and iterative design.

    Recent interviews and articles for the general public include: The Ethics of Emerging Technologies (podcast with Tom Byers and Mildred Cho), Aspen Institute Forum for the Future of Higher Education Interview Series - John Mitchell, and School of Engineering Interviews ”How can we improve online learning?” and “How can we design for security?.”

    Mitchell’s past research has focused on computer security, including network protocols, web security, and privacy, as well as programming languages and applications of mathematical logic to computer science. Relevant publications include Reinforcement Learning for the Adaptive Scheduling of Educational Activities (CHI 2020), Automated Analysis of Cryptographic Assumptions in Generic Group Models (J. Cryptology, 2019), Evaluating the privacy properties of telephone metadata (PNAS 2016), Third-party web tracking: Policy and technology (IEEE S&P). He is the author of two textbooks, Foundations for Programming Languages (1996) and Concepts in Programming Languages (2002); over 200 publications have received over 25,000 citations.

    Mitchell’s first research project in online learning started in 2009, when he and six undergraduate students built Stanford CourseWare, an innovative platform that expanded to support interactive video and discussion. CourseWare served as the foundation for initial flipped classroom experiments at Stanford and helped inspire the first massive open online courses (MOOCs) from Stanford. Professor Mitchell currently serves as Chair of the Stanford Department of Computer Science.