Graduate School of Education


Showing 121-128 of 128 Results

  • Peter Williamson

    Peter Williamson

    Director, Stanford Teacher Education Program for Secondary Teachers and Associate Professor (Teaching) of Education

    BioPeter Williamson is an Associate Professor, Teaching, at Stanford University. He served as the Faculty Director of the Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP) for Secondary Teachers from 2015 to 2021. Before coming to Stanford, Peter was an associate professor at the University of San Francisco, were he co-founded the San Francisco Teacher Residency Program. He earned his doctorate at Stanford, and he studies urban education, English education, education with incarcerated youth, curriculum, and literacy. Peter began his career as a special education teacher working with students who were identified with emotional and behavioral challenges, and then later taught middle and high school English and journalism in the Bay Area’s urban schools.

  • John Willinsky

    John Willinsky

    Khosla Family Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI work under the auspices of the Public Knowledge Project which is focused on extending access to, and the accessibility of, research and scholarship. The research is on student, professional, and public access to this educational resource, while PKP also engages in developing and designing open source software (free) publishing systems to improve the public and scholarly quality of peer-reviewed journals. This also involves international collaborations in Latin America, Africa, and South-East Asia are aimed at helping to better understand and strengthen scholarly publishing in those areas.

  • Sam Wineburg

    Sam Wineburg

    Margaret Jacks Professor of Education, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDistinguishing what is true in our current digital mess; the teaching and learning of history

    New book out in 2018, Why Learn History (When It's Already on Your Phone)

    How young people make decisions about what to believe on the Internet.

    New forms of assessment to measure historical understanding

    The creation of Web-based environments for the learning and teaching of history

  • Caroline Winterer

    Caroline Winterer

    William Robertson Coe Professor of History and American Studies, Professor of History and, by courtesy, of Classics and of Education

    BioCaroline Winterer is William Robertson Coe Professor of History and American Studies, and Professor by courtesy of Classics. She specializes in American history before 1900, especially the history of ideas, political thought, and the history of science. She is currently writing a book on the history of deep time in America, to be published by Princeton University Press.

    She teaches classes on American history until 1900, including American cultural and intellectual history, the American Enlightenment, the history of science, and the trans-Atlantic contexts of American thought.

    She is the author of five books, including most recently Time in Maps: From the Age of Discovery to Our Digital Era (Chicago, 2020), edited with her Stanford colleague Karen Wigen. Assembling a group of distinguished historians, cartographers, and art historians, the book shows how maps around the world for the last 500 years have ingeniously handled time in the spatial medium of maps.

    Her book American Enlightenments: Pursuing Happiness in the Age of Reason (Yale, 2016), showed how early Americans grappled with the promises of the Enlightenment – how they used new questions about the plants, animals, rocks, politics, religions and peoples of the New World to imagine a new relationship between the present and the past, and to spur far-flung conversations about a better future for all of humanity. Earlier books and articles have explored America's long tradition of looking at the ancient classical world for political, artistic, and cultural inspiration. She received an American Ingenuity Award from the Smithsonian Institution for mapping the social network of Benjamin Franklin: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/dear-sir-ben-franklin-would-like-to-add-you-to-his-network-180947639/.

    She is currently accepting graduate students. For more information on the PhD program in the Department of History, visit: https://history.stanford.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs.

  • Christine Min Wotipka

    Christine Min Wotipka

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Education and, by courtesy, of Sociology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCross-national, comparative, and longitudinal analyses of leadership and higher education with a focus on gender, sexuality, and race and ethnicity.

  • Jason Yeatman

    Jason Yeatman

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics), of Education and of Psychology

    BioDr. Jason Yeatman is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education and Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at Stanford University. Dr. Yeatman completed his PhD in Psychology at Stanford where he studied the neurobiology of literacy and developed new brain imaging methods for studying the relationship between brain plasticity and learning. After finishing his PhD, he took a faculty position at the University of Washington’s Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences before returning to Stanford.

    As the director of the Brain Development and Education Lab, the overarching goal of his research is to understand the mechanisms that underlie the process of learning to read, how these mechanisms differ in children with dyslexia, and to design literacy intervention programs that are effective across the wide spectrum of learning differences. His lab employs a collection of structural and functional neuroimaging measurements to study how a child’s experience with reading instruction shapes the development of brain circuits that are specialized for this unique cognitive function.