Bio-X


Showing 1-10 of 13 Results

  • Daibhid O Maoileidigh

    Daibhid O Maoileidigh

    Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Ó Maoiléidigh group employs mathematical and computational approaches to better understand normal hearing and hearing impairment. Because complete restoration of auditory function by artificial devices or regenerative treatments will only be possible when experiments and computational modeling align, we work closely with experimental laboratories. Our goal is to understand contemporary experimental observations, to make experimentally testable predictions, and to motivate new experiments. We are pursuing several projects.

    Hair-Bundle Mechanics

    Auditory and balance organs rely on hair cells to convert mechanical vibrations into electrical signals for transmission to the brain. In response to the quietest sounds we can hear, the hair cell's mechanical sensor, the hair bundle, moves by less than one-billionth of a meter. To determine how this astounding sensitivity is possible, we construct computational models of hair-bundle mechanics. By comparing models with experimental observations, we are learning how a hair bundle's geometry, material properties, and ability to move spontaneously determine its function.

    Cochlear Mechanics

    The cochlea contains the auditory organ that houses the sensory hair cells in mammals. Vibrations in the cochlea arising from sound are amplified more than a thousandfold by the ear's active process. New experimental techniques have additionally revealed that the cochlea vibrates in a complex manner in response to sound. We use computational models to interpret these observations and to make hypotheses about how the cochlea works.

  • Lucy Erin O'Brien

    Lucy Erin O'Brien

    Associate Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMany adult organs tune their functional capacity to variable levels of physiologic demand. Adaptive organ resizing breaks the allometry of the body plan that was established during development, suggesting that it occurs through different mechanisms. Emerging evidence points to stem cells as key players in these mechanisms. We use the Drosophila midgut, a stem-cell based organ analogous to the vertebrate small intestine, as a simple model to uncover the rules that govern adaptive remodeling.

  • Lauren O'Connell

    Lauren O'Connell

    Assistant Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe O'Connell lab studies how genetic and environmental factors contribute to biological diversity and adaptation. We are particularly interested in understanding (1) how behavior evolves through changes in brain function and (2) how animal physiology evolves through repurposing existing cellular components.

  • Detlef Obal

    Detlef Obal

    Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am primarily working at the Cardiovascular Institute (Director Joseph Wu, MD, PhD), studying the effect of different anesthetics on human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). Considering the current opioid epidemic, I am currently focusing on the effect of chronic opioid exposure on endothelial and cardiac function.

  • Jelena Obradović

    Jelena Obradović

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAdaptation, resilience, and developmental psychopathology of disadvantaged children populations; Stress reactivity and biological sensitivity to contextual influences; Executive function and self-regulatory abilities; Effects of risk, adversity, and social status on children’s development.

  • Allison Okamura

    Allison Okamura

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on developing the principles and tools needed to realize advanced robotic and human-machine systems capable of physical interaction. Application areas include surgery, simulation and training, rehabilitation, prosthetics, neuromechanics, exploration of hazardous and remote environments (e.g. space), design, and education.

  • Eric Olcott

    Eric Olcott

    Professor of Radiology (Veterans Affairs), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBody imaging utilizing CT, ultrasound and MRI. Imaging of appendicitis. Imaging of pancreatic and biliary malignancies. Imaging of trauma. Magnetic resonance angiography.

  • Richard A. Olshen

    Richard A. Olshen

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is in statistics and their applications to medicine and biology. Many efforts have concerned tree-structured algorithms for classification, regression, survival analysis, and clustering.

  • Kelly E. Ormond, MS, CGC

    Kelly E. Ormond, MS, CGC

    Clinical Professor, Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am currently serving as the Research Director for the MS in Human Genetics and Genetic Counseling program. My research focuses on the intersection between genetics and ethics, particularly around the translation of new genetic technologies (such as genome sequencing, non-invasive prenatal diagnosis and gene editing) into clinical practice. I am especially interested in patient decision making, consent and disclosure of genetic test results, and the interface between genetics and disability.

  • Anthony Oro, MD, PhD

    Anthony Oro, MD, PhD

    Eugene and Gloria Bauer Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab uses the skin to answer questions about epithelial stem cell biology, differentiation and carcinogenesis using genomics, genetics, and cell biological techniques. We have studied how hedgehog signaling regulates regeneration and skin cancer, and how tumors evolve to develop resistance. We study the mechanisms of early human skin development using human embryonic stem cells. These fundamentals studies provide a greater understanding of epithelial biology and novel disease therapeutics.