Bio-X


Showing 1-10 of 12 Results

  • Greg Zaharchuk

    Greg Zaharchuk

    Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImproving medical image quality using deep learning artificial intelligence
    Imaging of cerebral hemodynamics with MRI and CT
    Noninvasive oxygenation measurement with MRI
    Clinical imaging of cerebrovascular disease
    Imaging of cervical artery dissection
    MR/PET in Neuroradiology
    Resting-state fMRI for perfusion imaging and stroke

  • Jamil Zaki

    Jamil Zaki

    Associate Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the cognitive and neural bases of social behavior, and in particular on how people respond to each other's emotions (empathy), why they conform to each other (social influence), and why they choose to help each other (prosociality).

  • Richard Zare

    Richard Zare

    Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Natural Science and Professor, by courtesy, of Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research group is exploring a variety of topics that range from the basic understanding of chemical reaction dynamics to the nature of the chemical contents of single cells.

    Under thermal conditions nature seems to hide the details of how elementary reactions occur through a series of averages over reagent velocity, internal energy, impact parameter, and orientation. To discover the effects of these variables on reactivity, it is necessary to carry out studies of chemical reactions far from equilibrium in which the states of the reactants are more sharply restricted and can be varied in a controlled manner. My research group is attempting to meet this tough experimental challenge through a number of laser techniques that prepare reactants in specific quantum states and probe the quantum state distributions of the resulting products. It is our belief that such state-to-state information gives the deepest insight into the forces that operate in the breaking of old bonds and the making of new ones.

    Space does not permit a full description of these projects, and I earnestly invite correspondence. The following examples are representative:

    The simplest of all neutral bimolecular reactions is the exchange reaction H H2 -> H2 H. We are studying this system and various isotopic cousins using a tunable UV laser pulse to photodissociate HBr (DBr) and hence create fast H (D) atoms of known translational energy in the presence of H2 and/or D2 and using a laser multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer to detect the nascent molecular products in a quantum-state-specific manner by means of an imaging technique. It is expected that these product state distributions will provide a key test of the adequacy of various advanced theoretical schemes for modeling this reaction.

    Analytical efforts involve the use of capillary zone electrophoresis, two-step laser desorption laser multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry, cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and Hadamard transform time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We believe these methods can revolutionize trace analysis, particularly of biomolecules in cells.

  • Christopher K. Zarins

    Christopher K. Zarins

    Walter Clifford Chidester and Elsa Rooney Chidester Professor of Surgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHemodynamic factors in atherosclerosis, pathogenesis of, aortic aneurysms, carotid plaque localization and complication, anastomotic intimal hyperplasia, vascular biology of artery wall, computational fluid dynamics as applied to blood flow and vascular disease.

  • James L. Zehnder, M.D.

    James L. Zehnder, M.D.

    Professor of Pathology (Research) and of Medicine (Hematology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory focuses on translational research in 2 main areas - genomic approaches to diagnosis and minimal residual disease testing for patients with cancer, and molecular basis of disorders of thrombosis and hemostasis. My clinical focus is in molecular pathology, diagnosis and treatment of disorders of hemostasis and thrombosis and general hematology.

  • Michael Zeineh

    Michael Zeineh

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention)

    BioDr. Michael Zeineh began his journey into clinical neuroscience when he received a B.S. with Honors in Biology at Caltech in 1995. He next went to UCLA's M.D.-Ph.D. program, where he studied in the laboratory of Dr. Susan Bookheimer. His Ph.D. thesis examined memory formation using advanced hippocampal subfield functional MRI in normals as well as in aging. After an internal medicine internship also at UCLA, he went on to further study medical imaging by entering radiology residency at Stanford. Finding his enduring passion with neuroimaging, he pursued neuroradiology fellowship also at Stanford, and became faculty as of 2010. He spearheads many initiatives in advanced clinical imaging at Stanford. Simultaneously, he runs a lab with the goal of discovering new imaging abnormalities in neurodegenerative disorders, with a focus on the hippocampal formation using in vivo and ex vivo methods.

  • Jamie Zeitzer

    Jamie Zeitzer

    Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Zeitzer is a circadian physiologist specializing in the understanding of the impact of light on circadian rhythms and other aspects of non-image forming light perception.
    He examines the manner in which humans respond to light and ways to manipulate this responsiveness, with direct application to jet lag, shift work, and altered sleep timing in teens. Dr. Zeitzer has also pioneered the use of actigraphy in the determination of epiphenomenal markers of psychiatric disorders.

  • Renee Zhao

    Renee Zhao

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioRuike Renee Zhao is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University where she directs the Soft Intelligent Materials Laboratory. Renee received her BS degree from Xi'an Jiaotong University in 2012, and her MS and PhD degrees from Brown University in 2014 and 2016, respectively. She was a postdoc associate at MIT during 2016-2018 prior to her appointment as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at The Ohio State University from 2018 to 2021.
    Reneeā€™s research concerns the development of stimuli-responsive soft composites for multifunctional robotic systems with integrated shape-changing, assembling, sensing, and navigation. By combining mechanics, polymer engineering, and advanced material manufacturing techniques, the functional soft composites enable applications in soft robotics, miniaturized biomedical devices, flexible electronics, deployable and morphing structures.
    Renee is a recipient of the 2022 ASME Henry Hess Early Career Publication Award, 2022 ASME Pi Tau Sigma Gold Medal, 2021 ASME Applied Mechanics Division Journal of Applied Mechanics Award, 2020 NSF Career Award, and 2018 ASME Applied Mechanics Division Haythornthwaite Research Initiation Award.

  • Xiaolin Zheng

    Xiaolin Zheng

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, of Energy Science Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioProfessor Zheng received her Ph.D. in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University (2006), B.S. in Thermal Engineering from Tsinghua University (2000). Prior to joining Stanford in 2007, Professor Zheng did her postdoctoral work in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. Professor Zheng is a member of MRS, ACS and combustion institute. Professor Zheng received the TR35 Award from the MIT Technology Review (2013), one of the 100 Leading Global Thinkers by the Foreign Policy Magazine (2013), 3M Nontenured Faculty Grant Award (2013), the Presidential Early Career Award (PECASE) from the white house (2009), Young Investigator Awards from the ONR (2008), DARPA (2008), Terman Fellowship from Stanford (2007), and Bernard Lewis Fellowship from the Combustion Institute (2004).

  • Roseanna N. Zia

    Roseanna N. Zia

    Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab unifies mesoscale physics and chemistry with cellular-level biology through novel theoretical modeling and large-scale computational simulations. We work in four areas: 1) constructing micro-continuum theory of complex fluids; 2) mechanistically explaining non-equilibrium phase transitions in colloidal systems; 3) modeling confined and large-scale hydrodynamically-interacting colloidal suspensions; and 4) modeling the physics of living cells.