Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance


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  • Antoine Falisse

    Antoine Falisse

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Bioengineering

    BioDr. Falisse is a postdoctoral fellow in Bioengineering working on computational approaches to study human movement disorders. He primarily uses optimization methods, biomechanical modeling, and data from various sources (wearables, videos, medical images) to get insights into movement abnormalities and design innovative treatments and rehabilitation protocols.

    Dr. Falisse received his PhD from KU Leuven (Belgium) where he worked on modeling and simulating the locomotion of children with cerebral palsy. His research was supported by the Research Foundation Flanders (FWO) through a personal fellowship. Dr. Falisse received several awards for his PhD work, including the David Winter Young Investigator Award, the Andrzej J. Komor Young Investigator Award, the VPHi Thesis Award in In Silico Medicine, and the KU Leuven Research Council Award in Biomedical Sciences.

  • Nicos Haralabidis

    Nicos Haralabidis

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Bioengineering

    BioMy research interests lie within both sports and clinical biomechanics applications. I rely upon merging conventional biomechanical in vivo measurements together with state-of-the-art musculoskeletal modeling and optimal control simulation approaches. The integrative approach I take enables me to understand how an individual may run faster, jump further, walk following surgery or intervention, and simultaneously estimate internal body dynamics noninvasively. As a Postdoctoral Research Scholar within the Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance I aim to explore how stochastic optimal control and reinforcement learning methods can be applied to further our understanding of sporting performance.

  • Jennifer Maier

    Jennifer Maier

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Mechanical Engineering

    BioMy research interests include a broad variety of topics, ranging from medical image analysis and signal processing, machine learning and artificial intelligence, which I mainly focused on during my Ph.D. research. As a member of the Digital Athlete project of the Wu Tsai Performance Allience, I am now pursuing research to investigate how we can use wearable sensors, machine learning and biomechanical simulations to improve athlete performance, prevent injuries and support rehabilitation after injury.

    I completed my Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in medical engineering from Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU). In 2015, I worked on my master’s thesis under the supervision of Prof. Kamiar Aminian during a research stay in the Laboratory of Movement Analysis and Measurement (LMAM), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), supported by a DAAD Scholarship. Afterwards, I pursued my Ph.D. at FAU in the Pattern Recognition Laboratory under the supervision of Prof. Andreas Maier and in the Machine Learning and Data Analytics Lab under the supervision of Prof. Bjoern Eskofier. I worked on projects in collaboration with Stanford University and the Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos (UNISINOS) and conducted several short-term research stays at the partner universities. After finishing my Ph.D. in 2021, I joined Stanford University as a postdoctoral scholar advised by Prof. Ellen Kuhl.

  • Tom Van Wouwe

    Tom Van Wouwe

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Bioengineering

    BioI received a B.S. degree in Engineering Science, Mechanical Engineering (2013, KU Leuven, Belgium) and a M.Sc. in Engineering Science, Biomedical Technology (2015, KU Leuven, Belgium). I worked for a year as an engineer in the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson (Beerse, Belgium). After, I returned to academia for a PhD on computational methods to simulate neuromechanical models of human movement. In January 2018 I received a four-year FWO-SB fellowship on the topic of my dissertation. During my PhD I collaborated with the Computer Science research group of the Georgia Institute of Technology and with the Department of Biomechanical Engineering of the University of Twente resulting in academic publications. I supervised ten master students in Rehabilitation & Movement Sciences for their master’s thesis projects and taught the practical sessions in the second year biomechanics course for undergraduate students in Rehabilitation & Movement Sciences.