Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute


Showing 11-18 of 18 Results

  • Robert Fisher, MD, PhD

    Robert Fisher, MD, PhD

    The Maslah Saul, MD, Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Fisher is interested in clincal, laboratory and translational aspects of epilepsy research. Prior work has included: electrical deep brain stimulation for epilepsy, studied in laboratory models and clinical trials; drug delivery to a seizure focus; mechanisms of absence epilepsy studied with in vitro slices of brain thalamus; hyperthermic seizures; diagnosis and treatment of non-epileptic seizures, the post-ictal state; driving and epilepsy; new antiepileptic drugs; surgery for epilepsy.

  • Pamela Flood

    Pamela Flood

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (OB)

    BioDr. Flood is a Professor at Stanford University who is fellowship trained in Pain Medicine and Obstetric Anesthesiology. She specializes in the treatment of chronic pelvic pain and multiple aspects of women's health including the prevention of chronic pain after childbirth. Research interests include the role of multimodal treatment in chronic pain conditions and prevention of persistent opioid use. Her research has spanned from detailed pharmacodynamic analysis, clinical trials to population health.

  • Polly Fordyce

    Polly Fordyce

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Fordyce Lab is focused on developing new instrumentation and assays for making quantitative, systems-scale biophysical measurements of molecular interactions. Current research in the lab is focused on three main platforms: (1) arrays of valved reaction chambers for high-throughput protein expression and characterization, (2) spectrally encoded beads for multiplexed bioassays, and (3) sortable droplets and microwells for single-cell assays.

  • Michael Frank

    Michael Frank

    David and Lucile Packard Foundation Professor of Human Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow do we learn to communicate using language? I study children's language learning and how it interacts with their developing understanding of the social world. I use behavioral experiments, computational tools, and novel measurement methods like large-scale web-based studies, eye-tracking, and head-mounted cameras.

  • Hunter Fraser

    Hunter Fraser

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the evolution of complex traits by developing new experimental and computational methods.

    Our work brings together quantitative genetics, genomics, epigenetics, and evolutionary biology to achieve a deeper understanding of how genetic variation shapes the phenotypic diversity of life. Our main focus is on the evolution of gene expression, which is the primary fuel for natural selection. Our long-term goal is to be able to introduce complex traits into new species via genome editing.

  • Shai Friedland

    Shai Friedland

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy- Techniques and Outcomes
    2. Noninvasive colorectal cancer screening
    3. Medical device development in gastroenterology

  • Judith Frydman

    Judith Frydman

    Donald Kennedy Chair in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long term goal of our research is to understand how proteins fold in living cells. My lab uses a multidisciplinary approach to address fundamental questions about molecular chaperones, protein folding and degradation. In addition to basic mechanistic principles, we aim to define how impairment of cellular folding and quality control are linked to disease, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases and examine whether reengineering chaperone networks can provide therapeutic strategies.

  • Takako Fujioka

    Takako Fujioka

    Associate Professor of Music

    BioResearch topics include neural oscillations for auditory perception, auditory-motor coupling, brain plasticity in development and aging, and recovery from stroke with music-supported therapy.

    Her post-doctoral and research-associate work at Rotman Research Institute in Toronto was supported by awards from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Her research continues to explore the biological nature of human musical ability by examining brain activities with non-invasive human neurophysiological measures such as magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG).