Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute


Showing 21-39 of 39 Results

  • Y. Joyce Liao, MD, PhD

    Y. Joyce Liao, MD, PhD

    Stanford Medicine Professor of Ophthalmology and Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIschemic optic neuropathy
    Stem cell transplantation
    Optic neuropathy
    Optic neuritis
    Eye movement disorders
    Reading
    Parkinson's disease
    Multiple sclerosis

  • Michael Lim, M.D.

    Michael Lim, M.D.

    Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy), of Medicine (Oncology), of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and of Neurology

    BioDr. Lim is the Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery and a board-certified neurosurgeon specializing in brain tumors and trigeminal neuralgia.

    Dr. Lim’s clinical interests include the treatment of benign and malignant brain tumors, with special interest in gliomas, meningiomas, metastatic tumors, and skull base tumors. Dr. Lim also specializes in surgical treatments for trigeminal neuralgia. During his time at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Lim built one of the largest brain tumor and trigeminal neuralgia practices and utilized the most advanced surgical technologies and techniques for his patients. As a passionate voice for patient experience, he has been recognized by his peers and patients for his integrity and compassionate care, including a Service Excellence Award from HealthNetwork Foundation.

    As a mentor, he has garnered numerous teaching awards, including being honored as an outstanding teacher by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is actively involved in shaping education for neurosurgery and oncology across the United States and around the world. He is the recipient of the prestigious 2023 Abhijit Guha Award in Neuro-Oncology.

    Dr. Lim’s research interests focus on harnessing the immune system to fight cancer. His laboratory focuses on understanding mechanisms of immune evasion by cancer cells. He has successfully translated his findings from the laboratory to the clinics and has conducted and led several large national immunotherapy clinical trials for brain tumors.

    Dr. Lim’s bibliography contains well over 300 articles on topics such as immunotherapy for glioblastoma, long-term survival of glioma patients treated with stereotactic radiation, and treatment of neuropathic pain. His work has appeared in Science Translational Medicine, Clinical Cancer Research, Lancet Oncology, Nature Immunology, and many more publications. He also has written 20 book chapters and monographs.

    Dr. Lim is a world leader in immunotherapy for brain tumors. In addition to being invited world-wide to give lectures and seminars, he has given platform presentations on the topics of immunotherapy for brain tumors, neurosurgical techniques and management of brain tumors at the American Society of Clinical Oncologists, American Academy of Neurological Surgeons, Radiological Society of North America, Annual Symposium on Brain and Spine Metastases, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and other meetings. In addition, he has served as platform chairman of the CNS session at the American Society for Clinical Oncology conference.

    Dr. Lim is a member of the American Society for Clinical Oncology, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, and Society for Neuro-Oncology. Dr. Lim served as the program co-chair of the Society for Neuro-Oncology and CNS section of the American Society for Clinical Oncology. He also served on many executive committees, including the Executive Committee for the Joint Tumor Section of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  • Feng Vankee Lin

    Feng Vankee Lin

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy career has been devoted to understanding the neural mechanisms involved in brain aging and brain plasticity, with a special focus on early detection and prevention of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). My research approach integrates principles and findings from cognitive theory, clinical neuroscience, and computational neuroscience.

  • Michael Lin

    Michael Lin

    Associate Professor of Neurobiology, of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab applies biochemical and engineering principles to the development of protein-based tools for investigating biology in living animals. Topics of investigation include fluorescent protein-based voltage indicators, synthetic light-controllable proteins, bioluminescent reporters, and applications to studying animal models of disease.

  • Christian Linder

    Christian Linder

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering

    BioChristian Linder is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering. Through the development of novel and efficient in-house computational methods based on a sound mathematical foundation, the research goal of the Computational Mechanics of Materials (CM2) Lab at Stanford University, led by Dr. Linder, is to understand micromechanically originated multi-scale and multi-physics mechanisms in solid materials undergoing large deformations and fracture. Applications include sustainable energy storage materials, flexible electronics, and granular materials.

    Dr. Linder received his Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from UC Berkeley, an MA in Mathematics from UC Berkeley, an M.Sc. in Computational Mechanics from the University of Stuttgart, and a Dipl.-Ing. degree in Civil Engineering from TU Graz. Before joining Stanford in 2013 he was a Junior-Professor of Micromechanics of Materials at the Applied Mechanics Institute of Stuttgart University where he also obtained his Habilitation in Mechanics. Notable honors include a Fulbright scholarship, the 2013 Richard-von-Mises Prize, the 2016 ICCM International Computational Method Young Investigator Award, the 2016 NSF CAREER Award, and the 2019 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).

  • Scott W Linderman

    Scott W Linderman

    Assistant Professor of Statistics and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioScott is an Assistant Professor of Statistics and, by courtesy, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Stanford University. He is also an Institute Scholar in the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute and a member of Stanford Bio-X and the Stanford AI Lab. His lab works at the intersection of machine learning and computational neuroscience, developing statistical methods to analyze large scale neural data. Previously, Scott was a postdoctoral fellow with Liam Paninski and David Blei at Columbia University, and he completed his PhD in Computer Science at Harvard University with Ryan Adams and Leslie Valiant. He obtained his undergraduate degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Cornell University and spent three years as a software engineer at Microsoft before graduate school.

  • Wendy Liu, MD, PhD

    Wendy Liu, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Liu's research interests include the role of mechanosensation in the eye as it relates to the pathophysiology of glaucoma, with the goal of finding new druggable targets in glaucoma treatment.

  • James Lock

    James Lock

    Eric Rothenberg, MD Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsJames Lock, MD, Ph.D. is Professor of Child Psychiatry and Pediatrics in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine where he has taught since 1993. He is board certified in adult as well as child and adolescent psychiatry. He directs the eating disorder program in Child Psychiatry and is active in treatment research for children and adolescents with eating disorders.

  • Kyle Loh

    Kyle Loh

    Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology (Stem Cell)

    BioHow the richly varied cell-types in the human body arise from one embryonic cell is a biological marvel and mystery. We have mapped how human embryonic stem cells develop into over twenty different human cell-types. This roadmap allowed us to generate enriched populations of human liver, bone, heart and blood vessel precursors in a Petri dish from embryonic stem cells. Each of these tissue precursors could regenerate their cognate tissue upon injection into respective mouse models, with relevance to regenerative medicine. In addition to our interests in developmental and stem cell biology, we also interested in discovering the entry receptors and target cells of deadly biosafety level 4 viruses, together with our collaborators.

    Kyle attended the County College of Morris and Rutgers University, and received his Ph.D. from Stanford University (working with Irving Weissman), with fellowships from the Hertz Foundation, National Science Foundation and Davidson Institute for Talent Development. He then continued as a Siebel Investigator, and later, as an Assistant Professor and The Anthony DiGenova Endowed Faculty Scholar at Stanford, where he is jointly appointed in the Department of Developmental Biology and Institute for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine. Kyle is a Packard Fellow, Pew Scholar, Human Frontier Science Program Young Investigator and Baxter Foundation Faculty Scholar, and his research has been recognized by the NIH Director's Early Independence Award, Forbes 30 Under 30, Harold Weintraub Graduate Award, Hertz Foundation Thesis Prize and A*STAR Investigatorship.

  • Jonathan Z. Long

    Jonathan Z. Long

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    BioDr. Jonathan Long is an Associate Professor of Pathology and an Institute Scholar of Stanford ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). His laboratory studies signaling pathways in mammalian energy metabolism. The long-term goal of this program is to discover new molecules and pathways that can be translated into therapeutic opportunities for obesity, metabolic disease, and other age-associated chronic diseases. Work from the laboratory has been recognized by numerous awards from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the American Diabetes Association, and the Ono Pharma Foundation. Prior to arriving to Stanford, Dr. Long completed his Ph.D. in Chemistry at Scripps Research and his postdoctoral work at Harvard Medical School.

  • Frank M. Longo, MD, PhD

    Frank M. Longo, MD, PhD

    George E. and Lucy Becker Professor of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery
    On Partial Leave from 05/01/2024 To 07/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical interests include Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease and the development of effective therapeutics for these disorders. Laboratory interests encompass the elucidation of signaling mechanisms relevant to neurodegenerative disorders and the development of novel small molecule approaches for the treatment of neurodegenerative and other neurological disorders.

  • Billy W Loo, Jr, MD PhD FASTRO FACR

    Billy W Loo, Jr, MD PhD FASTRO FACR

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical specialty is precision targeted radiotherapy of thoracic cancers.

    My research is on developing next-generation ultra-rapid radiation therapy technology (PHASER) and studying the radiobiological effects of FLASH treatment.

    My clinical research is on advanced 4-D image-guided radiation therapy and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), and functional and metabolic imaging and imaging biomarkers.

  • Jaime Lopez, MD

    Jaime Lopez, MD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical interests are in the areas of Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring (IOM), clinical neurophysiology, electromyopgraphy and in the use of botulinum toxins in the treatment of neurologic disorders. Our IOM group’s research is in the development of new and innovative techniques for monitoring the nervous system during surgical and endovascular procedures and how these alter surgical management and patient outcomes. I am also active in formulating national IOM practice guidelines.

  • Christopher Lowe

    Christopher Lowe

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEvolution and development, specifically the evolution of the deuterostomes

  • Bingwei Lu

    Bingwei Lu

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in understanding how neural stem cells balance their self-renewal and differentiation and how deregulation of this process can result in brain tumor. We are also interested in mechanisms of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. We are using both Drosophila and mammalian models to address these fundamental questions.

  • Liqun Luo

    Liqun Luo

    Ann and Bill Swindells Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study how neurons are organized into specialized circuits to perform specific functions and how these circuits are assembled during development. We have developed molecular-genetic and viral tools, and are combining them with transcriptomic, proteomic, physiological, and behavioral approaches to study these problems. Topics include: 1) assembly of the fly olfactory circuit; 2) assembly of neural circuits in the mouse brain; 3) organization and function of neural circuits; 4) Tool development.