School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences


Showing 21-40 of 75 Results

  • William Scott

    William Scott

    Ph.D. Student in Environment and Resources

    BioWilliam Scott is a PhD Student and Kimmelman Family Fellow at Stanford University in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER). His research focuses on environmental economics, climate change, public policy, and the water-energy food nexus.

    Prior to coming Stanford, William worked at the University of Ottawa's Smart Prosperity Institute (Canada) a research institute focused on improving public policy for environmental and economic outcomes. He also worked with United Nations Environment in the Economy and Trade Branch to support emerging economies seeking to integrate sustainability into their national development strategies. William holds a Masters of Environment (Economics and Policy) from Griffith University and a BA from the University of Western Ontario, where he also played varsity football.

  • Paul Segall

    Paul Segall

    Professor of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I study active earthquake and volcanic process through data collection, inversion, and theoretical modeling. Using methods such as precise Global Positioning System (GPS) positioning and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) we are able to measure deformation in space and time and invert these data for the geometry of faults and magma chambers, and spatiotemporal variations in fault slip-rate and magma chamber dilation. The accumulation of shear strain in tectonic regions provides a direct measure of earthquake potential. Similarly, magma accumulation in the crust prior to eruptions causes measurable inflation. We use these data to develop and test models of active plate boundaries such as the San Andreas, and the Cascade and Japanese subduction zones, the nucleation of earthquakes, slow slip events, induced seismicity, and the physics of magma migration leading to volcanic eruptions. These physics-based models rely on principles and methodologies from solid and fluid dynamics.

    Teaching
    I teach introductory undergraduate classes in natural hazards and the prediction of volcanic eruptions, as well as graduate level courses on modeling earthquake and volcano deformation and geophysical inverse theory.

    Professional Activities
    James B. Macelwane Medal, American Geophysical Union (1990); fellow, American Geophysical Union (1990); fellow, Geological Society of America (1997); president, Tectonophysics Section, AGU (2002-04); U.S.G.S. Science of Earthquakes Advisory Committee (2002-06); California Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Committee (2003-07); chair, Plate Boundary Observatory Steering Committee (2003-06); N.S.F. Panel, Instruments and Facilities Program (1997-2000); associate editor, Journal of Geophysical Research (1984-87). William Smith Lecturer, Geological Society of London (2011). Charles A. Whitten Medal, American Geophysical Union (2014), National Academy of Sciences (2016)

  • Nikki Seymour

    Nikki Seymour

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Geological Sciences

    BioMy research primarily addresses the structural and thermal evolution of highly deformed continental crust. I am strongly field-oriented and particularly interested in the relationship between igneous & metamorphic processes and deformation from outcrop to regional scales, the influence of pluton emplacement on fault behavior, tectonic and metamorphic processes driving continental rifting and subduction, and processes that transport metal through the crust to form economic deposits.

  • Benjamin Shapero

    Benjamin Shapero

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science

    BioI am a geomicrobiologist and am broadly interested in the connections between protein biochemistry, environmental microbiology, and biogeochemistry. I hail from the surf town of Encinitas near San Diego. I completed my undergraduate studies at the University of Southern California (USC), where I majored in both Biological Sciences and Classical Saxophone Performance. At USC I volunteered in a cellular and molecular neuroscience lab, and it was there that I discovered my fascination with proteins. After graduation, I worked in a vaccine design lab at Scripps Research. This research fostered my growing fascination with protein biochemistry and further exposed me to the realm of microbiology. I have since followed my interests in proteins and microbiology, along with my longstanding passion for climate science, to the field of geomicrobiology. I am currently pursuing a Ph.D. in geomicrobiology at Stanford University in the Earth System Science department.

  • K Sharp

    K Sharp

    Senior Web Developer, School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences

    Current Role at StanfordSenior Web Developer for Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences, Dean's Office, developing back end infrastructure for school, department, program, and research group web sites as well as special projects and other areas of interest.

  • Meghan Marjorie Shea

    Meghan Marjorie Shea

    Ph.D. Student in Environment and Resources

    BioMeghan is a PhD student in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment & Resources, working to advance tools and methods for using environmental DNA (eDNA) to characterize marine biodiversity. Her work, at the intersection of biological oceanography and science & technology studies, seeks to center the human context of eDNA monitoring; she hopes to research both new scientific applications of eDNA as well as how stakeholders--from scientists to the general public--think about and engage with these applications.

    Beyond her research, Meghan is a campus liaison for the Monterey Area Research Institutions' Network for Education (MARINE), co-founder of Stanford Ocean Networking And Research (SONAR), and co-organizer of the Stanford STS Graduate Workshop. She is also committed to teaching and mentoring the next generation of environmental scholars. In her free time, Meghan plays steel pan and accumulates house plants.

  • Allison Sherris

    Allison Sherris

    Ph.D. Student in Environment and Resources
    Oral Comm Tutor, Hume Center

    BioAs a PhD candidate in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources, I investigate links between exposure to environmental contaminants and health outcomes in early life. My dissertation explore links between drinking water contamination in California's Central Valley and adverse birth outcomes. Another area of research investigates the impact of ambient particulate matter pollution on child respiratory health in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Broadly, I hope to use data science and interdisciplinary, community-engaged methods to understand the cumulative impact of chemical contaminants on communities and public health.

  • Evan Sherwin

    Evan Sherwin

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Energy Resources Engineering

    BioI study the role of hydrocarbon fuels in a rapidly decarbonizing economy. I'm a "pick important problems first and figure out the best methods later" kind of researcher, drawing on my expertise in techno-economic assessment, machine learning and applied statistics, econometrics, optimization, and various engineering subdisciplines along the way. My current focus is assessing and demonstrating the value of diverse methane emission sensing and mitigation technologies across the oil and gas value chain in an increasingly data-rich environment.

  • Aditi Sheshadri

    Aditi Sheshadri

    Assistant Professor of Earth System Science, by courtesy, in Geophysics and Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioI joined Stanford's Earth System Science department as an assistant professor 2018. Prior to this, I was a a Junior Fellow of the Simons Foundation in New York, and a postdoctoral research scientist at Columbia University’s Department of Applied Physics and Applied Math and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. I got my Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science at MIT's Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, in the Program for Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate, where I worked with R. Alan Plumb. I’m broadly interested in atmosphere and ocean dynamics, climate variability, and general circulation.

    I'm particularly interested in fundamental questions in atmospheric dynamics, which I address using a combination of theory, observations, and both idealized and comprehensive numerical experiments. Current areas of focus include the dynamics, variability, and change of the mid-latitude jets and storm tracks and the stratospheric polar vortex.

  • Lin Shi

    Lin Shi

    Ph.D. Student in Environment and Resources

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLin studies approaches to evaluating, communicating, and mitigating the life cycle environmental impacts of Information and Communication Technologies products, focusing on supply chains.