School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences


Showing 21-30 of 75 Results

  • William Scott

    William Scott

    Ph.D. Student in Environment and Resources

    BioWilliam Scott is a PhD Student and Kimmelman Family Fellow at Stanford University in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER). His research focuses on environmental economics, climate change, public policy, and the water-energy food nexus.

    Prior to coming Stanford, William worked at the University of Ottawa's Smart Prosperity Institute (Canada) a research institute focused on improving public policy for environmental and economic outcomes. He also worked with United Nations Environment in the Economy and Trade Branch to support emerging economies seeking to integrate sustainability into their national development strategies. William holds a Masters of Environment (Economics and Policy) from Griffith University and a BA from the University of Western Ontario, where he also played varsity football.

  • Paul Segall

    Paul Segall

    Professor of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I study active earthquake and volcanic process through data collection, inversion, and theoretical modeling. Using methods such as precise Global Positioning System (GPS) positioning and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) we are able to measure deformation in space and time and invert these data for the geometry of faults and magma chambers, and spatiotemporal variations in fault slip-rate and magma chamber dilation. The accumulation of shear strain in tectonic regions provides a direct measure of earthquake potential. Similarly, magma accumulation in the crust prior to eruptions causes measurable inflation. We use these data to develop and test models of active plate boundaries such as the San Andreas, and the Cascade and Japanese subduction zones, the nucleation of earthquakes, slow slip events, induced seismicity, and the physics of magma migration leading to volcanic eruptions. These physics-based models rely on principles and methodologies from solid and fluid dynamics.

    Teaching
    I teach introductory undergraduate classes in natural hazards and the prediction of volcanic eruptions, as well as graduate level courses on modeling earthquake and volcano deformation and geophysical inverse theory.

    Professional Activities
    James B. Macelwane Medal, American Geophysical Union (1990); fellow, American Geophysical Union (1990); fellow, Geological Society of America (1997); president, Tectonophysics Section, AGU (2002-04); U.S.G.S. Science of Earthquakes Advisory Committee (2002-06); California Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Committee (2003-07); chair, Plate Boundary Observatory Steering Committee (2003-06); N.S.F. Panel, Instruments and Facilities Program (1997-2000); associate editor, Journal of Geophysical Research (1984-87). William Smith Lecturer, Geological Society of London (2011). Charles A. Whitten Medal, American Geophysical Union (2014), National Academy of Sciences (2016)

  • Nikki Seymour

    Nikki Seymour

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Geological Sciences

    BioMy research primarily addresses the structural and thermal evolution of highly deformed continental crust. I am strongly field-oriented and particularly interested in the relationship between igneous & metamorphic processes and deformation from outcrop to regional scales, the influence of pluton emplacement on fault behavior, tectonic and metamorphic processes driving continental rifting and subduction, and processes that transport metal through the crust to form economic deposits.

  • K Sharp

    K Sharp

    Senior Web Developer, School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences

    Current Role at StanfordSenior Web Developer for Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences, Dean's Office, developing back end infrastructure for school, department, program, and research group web sites as well as special projects and other areas of interest.