School of Engineering


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  • Alex Abramson

    Alex Abramson

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Chemical Engineering

    BioMy passion is to create medical devices that make a difference in quality of life for patients worldwide. Currently, I am a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford in Prof. Zhenan Bao's lab developing flexible electronic devices for physiologic status monitoring. I received my Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from MIT working under Profs. Robert Langer and Giovanni Traverso, where my research focused on developing ingestible robotic capsules for oral biologic drug delivery. I am passionate about mentorship as well as entrepreneurship, and I volunteer locally to support STEM innovation in my community. Check out my website in the links section for more information in my research.

  • Monther Abu-Remaileh

    Monther Abu-Remaileh

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Genetics

    BioThe Abu-Remaileh Lab is interested in identifying novel pathways that enable cellular and organismal adaptation to metabolic stress and changes in environmental conditions. We also study how these pathways go awry in human diseases such as cancer, neurodegeneration and metabolic syndrome, in order to engineer new therapeutic modalities.

    To address these questions, our lab uses a multidisciplinary approach to study the biochemical functions of the lysosome in vitro and in vivo. Lysosomes are membrane-bound compartments that degrade macromolecules and clear damaged organelles to enable cellular adaptation to various metabolic states. Lysosomal function is critical for organismal homeostasis—mutations in genes encoding lysosomal proteins cause severe human disorders known as lysosomal storage diseases, and lysosome dysfunction is implicated in age-associated diseases including cancer, neurodegeneration and metabolic syndrome.

    By developing novel tools and harnessing the power of metabolomics, proteomics and functional genomics, our lab will define 1) how the lysosome communicates with other cellular compartments to fulfill the metabolic demands of the cell under various metabolic states, 2) and how its dysfunction leads to rare and common human diseases. Using insights from our research, we will engineer novel therapies to modulate the pathways that govern human disease.