School of Engineering


Showing 1-10 of 32 Results

  • Simone D'Amico

    Simone D'Amico

    Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics

    BioSimone D’Amico received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from Politecnico di Milano (2003) and the Ph.D. degree from Delft University of Technology (2010). From 2003 to 2014, he was research scientist and team leader at the German Aerospace Center (DLR). There, he gave key contributions to the design, development, and operations of spacecraft formation-flying and rendezvous missions such as GRACE (United States/Germany), TanDEM-X (Germany), PRISMA (Sweden/Germany/France), and PROBA-3 (ESA). Since 2014, he has been Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University, Founding director of the Space Rendezvous Laboratory (SLAB), and Satellite Advisor of the Student Space Initiative (SSSI), Stanford’s largest undergraduate organization. He has over 150 scientific publications and 2000 google scholar’s citations, including conference proceedings, peer-reviewed journal articles, and book chapters. D'Amico's research aims at enabling future miniature distributed space systems for unprecedented science and exploration. His efforts lie at the intersection of advanced astrodynamics, GN&C, and space system engineering to meet the tight requirements posed by these novel space architectures. The most recent mission concepts developed by Dr. D'Amico are a miniaturized distributed occulter/telescope (mDOT) system for direct imaging of exozodiacal dust and exoplanets and the Autonomous Nanosatellite Swarming (ANS) mission for characterization of small celestial bodies. D’Amico’s research is supported by NASA, AFRL, AFOSR, KACST, and Industry. He is member of the advisory board of startup companies such as Capella Space Corp and Infinite Orbits. He is member of the Space-Flight Mechanics Technical Committee of the AAS, Associate Fellow of AIAA, and Associate Editor of the Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics. Dr. D’Amico was recipient of the Leonardo 500 Award by the Leonardo da Vinci Society and the Italian Scientists and Scholars of North America Foundation, ISSNAF (2019), the Stanford’s Introductory Seminar Excellence Award (2019), the FAI/NAA‘s Group Diploma of Honor (2018), the Exemplary System Engineering Doctoral Dissertation Award by the International Honor Society for Systems Engineering OAA (2016), the DLR’s Sabbatical/Forschungssemester in honor of scientific achievements (2012), the DLR’s Wissenschaft Preis in honor of scientific achievements (2006), and the NASA’s Group Achievement Award for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment, GRACE (2004).

  • John Dabiri

    John Dabiri

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, of Mechanical Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Dabiri Lab conducts research at the intersection of fluid mechanics, energy and environment, and biology.

  • William Dally

    William Dally

    Professor (Research) of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioDally develops efficient hardware for demanding information processing problems and sustainable energy systems. His current projects include domain-specific accelerators for deep learning, bioinformatics, and SAT solving; redesigning memory systems for the data center; developing efficient methods for video perception; and developing efficient sustainable energy systems. His research involves demonstrating novel concepts with working systems. Previous systems include the MARS Hardware Accelerator, the Torus Routing Chip, the J-Machine, M-Machine, the Reliable Router, the Imagine signal and image processor, the Merrimac supercomputer, and the ELM embedded processor. His work on stream processing led to GPU computing. His group has pioneered techniques including fast capability-based addressing, processor coupling, virtual channel flow control, wormhole routing, link-level retry, message-driven processing, deadlock-free routing, pruning neural networks, and quantizing neural networks.

  • Bruce Daniel

    Bruce Daniel

    Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. MRI of Breast Cancer, particularly new techniques. Currently being explored are techniques including ultra high spatial resolution MRI and contrast-agent-free detection of breast tumors.

    2. MRI-guided interventions, especially MRI-compatible remote manipulation and haptics

    3. Medical Mixed Reality. Currently being explored are methods of fusing patients and their images to potentially improve breast conserving surgery, and other conditions.

  • Eric Darve

    Eric Darve

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Darve's research is focused on the development of numerical methods for high-performance scientific computing, numerical linear algebra, fast algorithms, parallel computing, and machine learning with applications in engineering.

  • Reinhold Dauskardt

    Reinhold Dauskardt

    Ruth G. and William K. Bowes Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Surgery

    BioDauskardt and his group have worked extensively on integrating new materials into emerging technologies including thin-film structures for nanoscience and energy technologies, high-performance composite and laminates for aerospace, and on biomaterials and soft tissues in bioengineering. His group has pioneered methods for characterizing adhesion and cohesion of thin films used extensively in device technologies. His research on wound healing has concentrated on establishing a biomechanics framework to quantify the mechanical stresses and biologic responses in healing wounds and define how the mechanical environment affects scar formation. Experimental studies are complimented with a range of multiscale computational capabilities. His research includes interaction with researchers nationally and internationally in academia, industry, and clinical practice.

  • David Davidson

    David Davidson

    Sr Research Engineer, Mechanical Engineering

    BioEducation
    University of Toronto Physics B.S (1978)
    University of Toronto Aerospace Sciences M.Sc. (1980)
    York University Physics Ph.D. (1986)

    Appointment:
    1986-present Senior Research Engineer, Mechanical Engineering Department

    Research Activities:
    Dr. Davidson’s research interests span the fields of gas dynamics and combustion kinetics. During his tenure at Stanford University he has developed a wide array of optical and laser-based diagnostic methods for combustion chemistry and propulsion studies and has advanced the use of these diagnostics in shock tubes. He currently manages the shock tube operations in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratories at Stanford University and actively mentors the approximately two dozen graduate students who use these facilities. He is a co-author of over 200 research publications and has been a member of the editorial advisory board for the International Journal of Chemical Kinetics and secretary of the Western States Section of the Combustion Institute.
    An overview of the shock tube studies performed at Stanford under Prof. Hanson’s and Dr. Davidson’s supervision can be found in the six volumes entitled “Fundamental Kinetics Database Utilizing Shock Tube Measurements” available at http://purl.stanford.edu/kb621cw6967.