School of Engineering


Showing 1-10 of 25 Results

  • Thomas Kenny

    Thomas Kenny

    Richard W. Weiland Professor and Senior Associate Dean for Student Affairs in the School of Engineering

    BioKenny's group is researching fundamental issues and applications of micromechanical structures. These devices are usually fabricated from silicon wafers using integrated circuit fabrication tools. Using these techniques, the group builds sensitive accelerometers, infrared detectors, and force-sensing cantilevers. This research has many applications, including integrated packaging, inertial navigation, fundamental force measurements, experiments on bio-molecules, device cooling, bio-analytical instruments, and small robots. Because this research field is multidisciplinary in nature, work in this group is characterized by strong collaborations with other departments, as well as with local industry.

  • Ellen Kuhl

    Ellen Kuhl

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestscomputaitonal simulation of brain development, cortical folding, computational simulation of cardiac disease, heart failure, left ventricular remodeling, electrophysiology, excitation-contraction coupling, computer-guided surgical planning, patient-specific simulation

  • David Kelley

    David Kelley

    Donald W. Whittier Professor in Mechanical Engineering

    BioDavid Kelley's work is dedicated to helping people gain confidence in their creative abilities. He employs a project based methodology called Design Thinking within both the Product Design Program and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design.

    Design Thinking is based on building empathy for user needs, developing solutions with iterative prototyping, and inspiring ideas for the future through storytelling.

    The Product Design program emphasizes the blending of engineering innovation, human values, and manufacturing concerns into a single curriculum. Kelley teaches engineering design methodology, the techniques of quick prototyping to prove feasibility, and design through understanding of user needs.

  • Barbara A. Karanian, Ph.D./School of Engineering

    Barbara A. Karanian, Ph.D./School of Engineering

    Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering

    BioBarbara A. Karanian, Ph.D. Barbara's research focuses on four areas: 1) grounding a blend of theories from social-cognitive psychology, engineering design and art to show how cognition affects design decisions; 2) changing the way people understand the emotion behind their work with the intent to do something new; 3) shifting norms of leaders involved in entrepreneurial minded action; 4) developing teaching methods with a storytelling focus in engineering education.

    Barbara teaches and studies how a person’s behavior at work is framed around a blend of applied theoretical perspectives from social psychology and cognitive psychology; engineering design thinking and art. Her storytelling methods provides a form for students to explore and discover the practices of inquiry from the class and apply them to how individuals behave within organizations, and the ways organizations face challenges. Active storytelling and self-reflective observation helps student and industry leaders to iterate and progress from the early idea phases of projects to reality. Founder of the Design Entrepreneuring Studio, she is the author of,"Working Connection: The Relational Art of Leadership;" "Entrepreneurial Leadership: A Balancing Act in Engineering and Science;" and "Designing for Social Participation in the Virtual Universe." In ME 378, Tell/Make/Engage - action stories for entrepreneuring class, story is code for transition - considering ways to thrive across the developmental stages of a research project, a dissertation, career path change, or a start-up company. With her students, she co-authored, "The Power of First Moments in Entrepreneurial Storytelling." Findings show that the use of vulnerability amplifies engagement. In another class, ME 236 - Tales to Design Cars By- the opportunity to investigate a person’s relationship with cars through the application of research, design thinking, and with a generative storytelling focus-students find the inspiration for designing a new automotive experience.
    Barbara makes productive partnerships with industry and creates collaborative teams with members from the areas of engineering, design, psychology, business, and communication. Her recent work examines: ways to generate creative work environments; motivators for modes of transportation; leader problem-solving for group effectiveness by iterating on an intelligent wall; and perceived differences in on-line and off-line lives. She also bridges the intersection of Silicon Valley and Hollywood in an initiative for building a predictive model of success. Barbara received her B.A. in the double major of Experimental Psychology and Fine Arts from the College of the Holy Cross, her M.A. in Art Therapy from Lesley University, and her Ph.D. in Educational Studies in Organizational Behavior from Lesley University. She was a Teaching Fellow 1990-1991 at Harvard University's GSE; and in 2013 awarded best Teaching Strategies paper by ASEE's Entrepreneurship & Innovation division.