School of Engineering


Showing 1-10 of 24 Results

  • Parviz Moin

    Parviz Moin

    Franklin P. and Caroline M. Johnson Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioMoin is the founding director of the Center for Turbulence Research. Established in 1987 as a research consortium between NASA and Stanford, Center for Turbulence Research is devoted to fundamental studies of turbulent flows. Center of Turbulence Research is widely recognized as the international focal point for turbulence research, attracting diverse groups of researchers from engineering, mathematics and physics.

    Professor Moin pioneered the use of direct and Large Eddy Simulation techniques for the study of turbulence physics, control and modelling concepts and has written widely on the structure of turbulent shear flows. His current interests include: interaction of turbulent flows and shock waves, aerodynamic noise and hydroacoustics, aerooptics, combustion, numerical analysis, turbulence control, large eddy simulation and parallel computing. He is an Editor of the Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics and Associate Editor of Physics of Fluids, Journal of Computational Physics.

  • Walter Murray

    Walter Murray

    Professor (Research) of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Murray's research interests include numerical optimization, numerical linear algebra, sparse matrix methods, optimization software and applications of optimization. He has authored two books (Practical Optimization and Optimization and Numerical Linear Algebra) and over eighty papers. In addition to his University work he has extensive consulting experience with industry, government, and commerce.

  • Boris Murmann

    Boris Murmann

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioBoris Murmann is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He joined Stanford in 2004 after completing his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley in 2003. From 1994 to 1997, he was with Neutron Microelectronics, Germany, where he developed low-power and smart-power ASICs in automotive CMOS technology. Since 2004, he has worked as a consultant with numerous Silicon Valley companies. Dr. Murmann’s research interests are in mixed-signal integrated circuit design, with special emphasis on sensor interfaces, data converters and custom circuits for machine learning. In 2008, he was a co-recipient of the Best Student Paper Award at the VLSI Circuits Symposium and a recipient of the Best Invited Paper Award at the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference (CICC). He received the Agilent Early Career Professor Award in 2009 and the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award in 2012. He has served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, as well as the Data Converter Subcommittee Chair and the Technical Program Chair of the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC). He is the founding faculty co-director of the Stanford SystemX Alliance and the faculty director of Stanford's System Prototyping Facility (SPF). He is a Fellow of the IEEE.

  • Eileen Martin

    Eileen Martin

    Ph.D. Student in Computational and Mathematical Engineering, admitted Autumn 2012

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsscientific computing, signal processing, passive seismic imaging, distributed acoustic sensing, inverse problems, real-time/frequent seismic monitoring

  • Danielle Maddix

    Danielle Maddix

    Ph.D. Student in Computational and Mathematical Engineering, admitted Autumn 2013

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI develop advanced numerical methods for nonlinear partial differential equations in terms of stability, accuracy and conservation. I am advised by Professor Margot Gerritsen.

  • Ali Mani

    Ali Mani

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioOur research is broadly defined by multiphysics problems in fluid dynamics and transport engineering. Our work contributes to the understanding of these problems primarily through theoretical tools such as techniques of applied mathematics as well as massively-parallel simulations. Numerical simulations enable quantitative visualization of the detailed physical processes which can be difficult to detect experimentally. They also provide quantitative data that guide the development of reduced-order models, which would naturally induce insight for design, optimization and control. Most of our work involves complementary interactions with experimental groups within and outside of Stanford. Specific current research topics include:

    (1) Electro-convection and microscale chaos near electrochemical interfaces

    (2) Particle-laden flows with applications in solar receivers

    (3) Applications of superhydrophobic surfaces for drag reduction of turbulent flows

    (4) Micro-bubble generation by breaking waves

    (5) Electrokinetics of micropores and nanopores

  • Song Mei

    Song Mei

    Ph.D. Student in Computational and Mathematical Engineering, admitted Autumn 2014

    BioI am a third year Ph. D. student in Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering at Stanford, advised by Andrea Montanari. Before coming to California, I studied Mathematics at Peking University. My research interest lies broadly in data sciences, say, in the intersection of applied probability, statistics, machine learning, information theory, and computations. Currently, I am interested in random matrices and random graphs, convex and non-convex optimizations, sequential testing and adaptive design.