School of Engineering


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  • Koosha Nassiri Nazif

    Koosha Nassiri Nazif

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Electrical Engineering

    BioDr. Koosha Nassiri Nazif received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering (Jan 2022) and his M.S. in Mechanical Engineering (2016) from Stanford University. Along the way, he worked at Apple (2019) on OLED/LCD displays and at HP Labs (2017) on 3D electronics thermal management. He is currently a post-doctoral scholar at Stanford developing novel flexible optoelectronic devices, including solar cells and wearable sensors, based on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides.

  • Renato Navarro

    Renato Navarro

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Materials Science and Engineering

    BioMy research goal is to achieve comprehensive solutions to cardiovascular clinical challenges via chemistry approaches to produce tailorable materials that serve as scaffolds or therapeutic delivery vehicles that enhance tissue regeneration. I am a trained polymer chemist with expertise in biomaterials engineering for cardiovascular regeneration and nanomedicine. My graduate research experience, under the supervision of Peter X. Ma, focused on broadening the use of tunable tissue engineering scaffolds by developing polymers with chemical functionality that can be easily and rapidly fashioned into biomimetic physical constructs and activated with regulatory signals (biomolecules, peptides, and growth factors). I accomplished this by developing novel polymer synthesis methods that are cost-effective and facile to ease the path toward clinical translation. As a postdoctoral scholar, my current training is under the co-supervision of Prof. Sarah Heilshorn and Prof. Joseph Wu as a K99/R00 MOSAIC Fellow. My work entails the development of tailored injectable hydrogels for the local delivery of therapies after a myocardial infarct.

  • Lars Thorben Neustock

    Lars Thorben Neustock

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLars's research interest lies at the intersection of optimization, applied physics and numerical methods. He is interested in understanding how we can use modern numerical methods and optimization techniques to improve physical devices in photon and charged particle optics. Hereby, the shape and topology of a device oftentimes plays a crucial role in its behavior. Lars is building computational models, including the application of adjoint design sensitivity analysis, to improve device shapes.