School of Engineering


Showing 1-6 of 6 Results

  • Johan Ugander

    Johan Ugander

    Assistant Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioProfessor Ugander's research develops algorithmic and statistical frameworks for analyzing social networks, social systems, and other large-scale data-rich contexts. He is particularly interested in the challenges of causal inference and experimentation in these complex domains. His work commonly falls at the intersections of graph theory, machine learning, statistics, optimization, and algorithm design.

  • Scott Uhlrich

    Scott Uhlrich

    Research Engineer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental biomechanical analysis of healthy and pathological human movement. Real-time biofeedback to modify motor control and kinematics.

    Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation for estimating unmeasurable quantities during movement, like joint forces in individuals with osteoarthritis. Predictive musculoskeletal simulations to design rehabilitation interventions.

    Computer vision, wearable sensing, and machine learning to develop tools that democratize biomechanical analysis and translate biomechanical interventions into clinical practice.

    Quantitative MRI for analyzing the effect of non-surgical treatments for osteoarthritis on cartilage health. PET-MRI for analyzing relationships between the mechanical loading of tissue metabolic activity.

  • Jeffrey Ullman

    Jeffrey Ullman

    Stanford Warren Ascherman Professor of Engineering , Emeritus

    BioJeff Ullman is the Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Engineering
    (Emeritus) in the Department of Computer Science at Stanford and CEO
    of Gradiance Corp. He received the B.S. degree from Columbia
    University in 1963 and the PhD from Princeton in 1966. Prior to his
    appointment at Stanford in 1979, he was a member of the technical
    staff of Bell Laboratories from
    1966-1969, and on the faculty of Princeton University between
    1969 and 1979. From 1990-1994, he was chair of the Stanford Computer
    Science Department. Ullman was elected to the National Academy of
    Engineering in 1989, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in
    2012, and has held Guggenheim and Einstein Fellowships. He has
    received the Sigmod Contributions Award (1996), the ACM Karl V. Karlstrom
    Outstanding Educator Award (1998), the Knuth Prize (2000),
    the Sigmod E. F. Codd Innovations award (2006), the IEEE von
    Neumann medal (2010), and the NEC C&C Foundation Prize (2017).
    He is the author of 16 books, including books
    on database systems, compilers, automata theory, and algorithms.

  • Javier Urzay

    Javier Urzay

    Sr. Research Engineer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHigh-speed, chemically reacting, multi-phase turbulent flows,
    hypersonic aerothermodynamics, supersonic combustion,
    high-pressure propulsion systems, chemical rockets,
    and their applications to aeronautics and astronautics.

  • Jeremy Utley

    Jeremy Utley

    Adjunct Professor

    BioJeremy leads the d.school's work with organizations as the Director of Executive Education. In this role, he advises professionals and organizations on how to imbed the tools of design thinking and cultivate an innovative organizational culture. He also teaches two celebrated courses -- d.leadership and LaunchPad -- advanced offerings focused on creating real-world impact with the tools of design. He is also the host of the d.school's "Masters of Creativity" series.

    Jeremy speaks and writes extensively on the history of invention, discovery, creativity, and innovation.

    Jeremy never expected to be a designer. On his 10th birthday, his father asked him what he wanted to be when he grew up. Jeremy replied,”I want to be one of the people who carry boxes with handles.” A little over a decade later, Jeremy became a briefcase-carrying management consultant focusing on economic development. Then, in 2008, the d.school derailed him completely. His time as a student and a fellow at the d.school showed him that “how” he worked was more important than “what” he did. Today, Jeremy is dedicated to helping others along the same path to becoming a designer. He helps people change their deeply-engrained behaviors and discover, as he did, that it is possible for them to make a difference. He does this through teaching as well as through growing alongside his students to become better in his own life and work every day.

    Jeremy is the Director of Executive Education at the d.school. He is a graduate of The University of Texas at Austin’s Red McComb’s School of Business (2005) and the Stanford University Graduate School of Business (2009).

  • Camille Utterback

    Camille Utterback

    Associate Professor of Art and Art History and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioCamille Utterback is an internationally acclaimed artist whose interactive installations and reactive sculptures engage participants in a dynamic process of kinesthetic discovery and play. Utterback’s work explores the aesthetic and experiential possibilities of linking computational systems to human movement and gesture in layered and often humorous ways. Her work focuses attention on the continued relevance and richness of the body in our increasingly mediated world.

    Her work has been exhibited at galleries, festivals, and museums internationally, including The Frist Center for Visual Arts, Nashville, TN; The Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, CA; ZERO1 The Art & Technology Network, San Jose, CA; The New Museum of Contemporary Art, The American Museum of the Moving Image, New York; The NTT InterCommunication Center, Tokyo; The Seoul Metropolitan Museum of Art; The Netherlands Institute for Media Art; The Taipei Museum of Contemporary Art; The Center for Contemporary Art, Kiev, Ukraine; and the Ars Electronica Center, Austria. Utterback’s work is in private and public collections including Hewlett Packard, Itaú Cultural Institute in São Paolo, Brazil, and La Caixa Foundation in Barcelona, Spain.

    Awards and honors include a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2009), a Transmediale International Media Art Festival Award (2005), a Rockefeller Foundation New Media Fellowship (2002) and a commission from the Whitney Museum for the CODeDOC project on their ArtPort website (2002). Utterback holds a US patent for a video tracking system she developed while working as a research fellow at New York University (2004). Her work has been featured in The New York Times (2010, 2009, 2003, 2002, 2001), Art in America (October, 2004), Wired Magazine (February 2004), ARTnews (2001) and many other publications. It is also included in Thames & Hudson’s World of Art – Digital Art book (2003) by Christiane Paul.

    Recent public commissions include works for the Liberty Mutual Group, the FOR-SITE Foundation, The Sacramento Airport, The City of San Jose, California, The City of Fontana, California, and the City of St. Louis Park, Minnesota. Other commissions include projects for The American Museum of Natural History in New York, The Pittsburgh Children’s Museum, The Manhattan Children’s Museum, Herman Miller, Shiseido Cosmetics, and other private corporations.

    Utterback is currently an Assistant Professor in the Art and Art History Department at Stanford University. She holds a BA in Art from Williams College, and a Masters degree from The Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. She currently lives and works in San Francisco.