School of Engineering


Showing 1-10 of 41 Results

  • Ken Waldron

    Ken Waldron

    Professor (Research) of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioKenneth J. Waldron is Professor of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering at UTS. He is also Professor Emeritus from the Design Group in the Department of Mechanical Engineering of Stanford University. He holds bachelors and masters degrees from the University of Sydney, and PhD from Stanford. He works in machine design, and design methodology with a particular focus on robotic and mechatronic systems.

  • Todd Walter

    Todd Walter

    Sr Research Engineer, Aeronautics and Astronautics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHigh integrity satellite navigation for guiding aircraft, including satellite based augmentation systems (SBAS) and advanced receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (ARAIM).

  • Michael Walton

    Michael Walton

    Adjunct Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioMichael Walton has 40 years of labor relations experience in the construction industry. He has been a Consulting Professor and Consulting Associate Professor at Stanford University for 28 years, teaching a graduate course in construction industry labor relations for the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department.

    He is the Owner and President of Employers’ Advocate, Inc., a management labor relations consulting firm with offices in Walnut Creek and Sacramento, CA. Mr. Walton’s firm manages construction industry multi-employer associations and represents association members, individual contractors, and public and private owners in labor relations, collective bargaining and administration of labor agreements. Mr. Walton has been instrumental in negotiating and administering construction industry Basic Craft collective bargaining agreements. He has extensive expertise in negotiating and/or administering building trades’ project labor agreements, including the J. Paul Getty Center Project, Los Angeles; Pacific Bell Ballpark Project, San Francisco; and WSDOT SR 99 Bored Tunnel Alternative Design-Build Project, Seattle.

    Mr. Walton serves as Secretary of the Construction Employers’ Association (CEA), a full service multi-employer association of over one hundred prominent union-affiliated building contractors who collectively perform over $15 billion dollars in private and public construction volume annually. Mr. Walton’s other contractor association clients include the Association of Drilled Shaft Contractors, West Coast Chapter; Association of Environmental Contractors and Association of Construction Employers.

    Prior to co-founding Employers’ Advocate, Inc., Mr. Walton was employed for 12 years by the Associated General Contractors of California, Inc. (AGC) where he served as AGC’s Northern California Director of Labor Relations from 1978-1985.

  • Brian A. Wandell

    Brian A. Wandell

    Isaac and Madeline Stein Family Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering, of Ophthalmology and at the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModels and measures of the human visual system. The brain pathways essential for reading development. Diffusion tensor imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging and computational modeling of visual perception and brain processes.

  • Bo Wang

    Bo Wang

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Developmental Biology

    BioWe are a discovery-driven research group working at the interface between statistical physics, developmental biology, and bioengineering. We combine quantitative organism-wide fluorescence imaging ("deep imaging"), functional genomics ("deep sequencing"), and statistical modeling to study systems biology and evolutionary cell biology of flatworms, including free living planarians and parasitic flukes. Using these animals, we seek to understand quantitatively the fundamental rules that control stem cell collective behavior to optimize tissue regeneration, remolding, and adaptation.

  • Hai Wang

    Hai Wang

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioHai Wang is Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. His interests are in renewable energy conversion, catalysis and combustion. His current research focuses on theories and applications of nanoparticles and nanostructures for rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, combustion simulations and nanocatalysis. He is the author and coauthor of numerous papers in scholarly journals, including "Mesoporous titania films prepared by flame stabilized on a rotating surface-Application in dye sensitized solar cells" in Journal of Physical Chemistry C, “A detailed kinetic modeling study of aromatics formation in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames” in Combustion and Flame, “Drag force, diffusion coefficient, and electric mobility of small particles. I. Theory applicable to the free-molecule regime” in Physical Review E, “A new mechanism for the formation of meteoritic kerogen-like material” in Science, “Gas-nanoparticle scattering: A molecular view of momentum accommodation function” in Physical Review Letters, and “Formation of nascent soot and other condensed-phase materials in flames” in Proceedings of the Combustion Institute. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Energy and Combustion Science, a highly influential energy journal published by Elsevier with an impact factor of 25.2 (2017).

  • Shan X. Wang

    Shan X. Wang

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Wang is the Director of Stanford Center for Magnetic Nanotechnology, and the Co-PI of the Stanford Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence. His research interests lie in nanotechnology and information storage, including magnetic/spintronic biochips, in vitro diagnostics, cell sorting, magnetic nanoparticles, nano-patterning, spin electronic materials and sensors, as well as magnetic integrated inductors and transformers.