School of Engineering


Showing 1-20 of 235 Results

  • Alexandria Boehm

    Alexandria Boehm

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioMy primary research area is coastal water quality, and recently I have expanded my research to include activities on sanitation more broadly. The work on coastal water quality is focused on understanding the sources, transformation, transport, and ecology of biocolloids - specifically fecal indicator organisms, pathogens, and phytoplankton, as well as sources and fate of nitrogen and phosphorus. This knowledge is crucial to directing new policies, and management and engineering practices that protect human and ecosystem health along the coastal margin. The work on sanitation aims to develop microbial risk assessment models to gain a better understanding of how pathogens are transmitted to humans through their contact with water, feces, and contaminated surfaces. Research is focused on key problems in developed and developing countries. The goal is to design and test effective interventions and technologies for reducing the burden of infectious disease.

  • Craig Criddle

    Craig Criddle

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioCriddle's research focuses on biotechnology and microbial ecology for clean water, clean energy, and healthy ecosystems.

  • Peter M Pinsky

    Peter M Pinsky

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Civil Engineering

    BioPinsky works in the theory and practice of computational mechanics with a particular interest in multiphysics problems in biomechanics. His work uses the close coupling of techniques for molecular, statistical and continuum mechanics with biology, chemistry and clinical science. Areas of current interest include the mechanics of human vision (ocular mechanics) and the mechanics of hearing. Topics in the mechanics of vision include the mechanics of transparency, which investigates the mechanisms by which corneal tissue self-organizes at the molecular scale using collagen-proteoglycan-ion interactions to explain the mechanical resilience and almost perfect transparency of the tissue and to provide a theoretical framework for engineered corneal tissue replacement. At the macroscopic scale, advanced imaging data is used to create detailed models of the 3-D organization of collagen fibrils and the results used to predict outcomes of clinical techniques for improving vision as well as how diseased tissue mechanically degrades. Theories for mass transport and reaction are being developed to model metabolic processes and swelling in tissue. Current topics in the hearing research arena include multiscale modeling of hair-cell mechanics in the inner ear including physical mechanisms for the activation of mechanically-gated ion channels. Supporting research addresses the mechanics of lipid bilayer cell membranes and their interaction with the cytoskeleton. Recent past research topics include computational acoustics for exterior, multifrequency and inverse problems; and multiscale modeling of transdermal drug delivery. Professor Pinsky currently serves as Chair of the Mechanics and Computation Group within the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford.

  • Alfred M. Spormann

    Alfred M. Spormann

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, of Chemical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMetabolism of anaerobic microbes in diseases, bioenergy, and bioremediation

  • Lynn Hildemann

    Lynn Hildemann

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioLynn Hildemann's current research areas include the sources and dispersion of indoor aerosols, the physicochemical properties of organic aerosols, and assessment of human exposure to PM.

    Prof. Hildemann received BS, MS, and PhD degrees in environmental engineering science from the California Institute of Technology. She is an author on >80 peer-reviewed publications, including three with over 700 citations each, and another 16 with over 100 citations each. She has been honored with Young Investigator Awards from NSF and ONR, the Kenneth T. Whitby Award from the AAAR (1998), and Stanford's Gores Award for Teaching Excellence (2013); she also was a co-recipient of Atmospheric Environment’s Haagen-Smit Outstanding Paper Award (2001).

    She has served on advisory committees for the Bay Area Air Quality Management District and for the California Air Resources Board. She has been an Associate Editor for Environmental Science & Technology, and Aerosol Science and Technology. She currently is on the advisory board for the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

    At Stanford, Prof. Hildemann is currently chair of the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering. She has chaired the School of Engineering Library Committee and the University Committee on Judicial Affairs, and serves as an elected member of the University Faculty Senate.

  • Jeffrey R. Koseff

    Jeffrey R. Koseff

    William Alden Campbell and Martha Campbell Professor in the School of Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioJeff Koseff, founding co-director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, is an expert in the interdisciplinary domain of environmental fluid mechanics. His research focuses on the interaction between physical and biological systems in natural aquatic environments, and in particular on turbulence and internal wave dynamics; transport, mixing, and phytoplankton dynamics in estuarine systems; and coral reef, kelp forest, and sea-grass hydrodynamics. More recently he has begun focusing on the fate of brine discharges in the near coastal ocean from desalination facilities, and on the use of natural vegetation for providing coastal protection and resilience. Long-term research projects include understanding the transport of mass and momentum in estuarine systems such as San Francisco Bay, and understanding how water flow affects the functioning of California kelp forests, and the coral reef systems of the Great Barrier Reef, the Red Sea and Hawaii. Koseff has served on the board of governors of the Israel Institute of Technology and has served on the visiting committees of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon University, Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research and The MIT-WHOI Joint Program. He is a former member of the Independent Science Board of the Bay/Delta Authority.

  • Richard Luthy

    Richard Luthy

    Silas H. Palmer Professor of Civil Engineering

    BioRichard G. Luthy is the Silas H. Palmer Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering. He is the Director of the NSF Engineering Research Center for Re-inventing the Nation’s Urban Water Infrastructure (ReNUWIt), a four-university consortium that seeks more sustainable solutions to urban water challenges in the arid west.

    His area of teaching and research is environmental engineering and water quality with applications to water reuse, stormwater use, and systems-level analysis of our urban water challenges. His research addresses management of persistent organic contaminants and contaminants of emerging concern in natural systems that are engineered to improve water quality and protect the environment and human health.

    Professor Luthy is a past chair of the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board and a former President of the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors. He chaired the NRC's Committee on the Beneficial Use of Stormwater and Graywater. He is a registered professional engineer, a board certified environmental engineer, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

  • Oliver Fringer

    Oliver Fringer

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioFringer's research focuses on the development and application of numerical models and high-performance computational techniques to the study of fundamental processes that influence the dynamics of the coastal ocean, rivers, lakes, and estuaries.

  • James Leckie

    James Leckie

    C.L. Peck, Class of 1906 Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Geological Sciences

    BioLeckie investigates chemical pollutant behavior in natural aquatic systems and engineered processes, specifically the environmental aspects of surface and colloid chemistry and the geochemistry of trace elements. New research efforts are focused on the development of techniques and models for assessment of exposure of humans to toxic chemicals. Specific attention has been paid to the evaluation of exposure of young children to toxic chemicals. Other interests include technology transfer and the development of environmental science programs in developing nations.

  • Mark Jacobson

    Mark Jacobson

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy, and at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioMark Z. Jacobson’s career has focused on better understanding air pollution and global warming problems and developing large-scale clean, renewable energy solutions to them. Toward that end, he has developed and applied three-dimensional atmosphere-biosphere-ocean computer models and solvers to simulate air pollution, weather, climate, and renewable energy. He has also developed roadmaps to transition states and countries to 100% clean, renewable energy for all purposes and computer models to examine grid stability in the presence of high penetrations of renewable energy.

  • Ronaldo Borja

    Ronaldo Borja

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioBorja works in computational mechanics, geomechanics, and geosciences. His research includes developing strain localization and failure models for soils and rocks, modeling coupled solid deformation/fluid flow phenomena in porous materials, and finite element modeling of faulting, cracking, and fracturing in quasi-brittle materials.

  • Jack Baker

    Jack Baker

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioJack Baker's research focuses on the use of probabilistic and statistical tools for modeling of extreme loads on structures. He has investigated probabilistic modeling of seismic hazards, improved characterization of earthquake ground motions, dynamic analysis of structures, prediction of the spatial extent of soil failures from earthquakes, and tools for modeling loads on spatially distributed infrastructure systems. Dr. Baker joined Stanford from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich), where he was a visiting researcher in the Department of Structural Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in Structural Engineering from Stanford University, where he also earned M.S. degrees in Statistics and Structural Engineering. He has industry experience in seismic hazard assessment, ground motion selection, construction management, and modeling of catastrophe losses for insurance companies.

  • Kincho Law

    Kincho Law

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioLaw's research interest is in the application of advanced computing principles and techniques for structural engineering analysis and design. His research interests include computational mechanics, numerical methods, and analysis and simulation of large-scale systems using distributed workstations and high performance parallel computers. His work has also dealt with sensing, monitoring and control of structures as well as various aspects of computer-aided design, including application of information technology to facilitate regulatory compliance assistance, to facilitate analysis and design of building structures and to coordinate concurrent engineering design activities.

  • Martin Reinhard

    Martin Reinhard

    Professor (Research) of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Emeritus

    BioReinhard studies the fate of organic substances in the subsurface environment and develops technologies for the remediation of groundwater contaminated with chlorinated and non-chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds. His research is concerned with mechanistic aspects of chemical and biological transformation reactions in soils, natural waters, and treatment systems.

  • Sarah Billington

    Sarah Billington

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioOur group conducts research on sustainable, durable construction materials and their application to structures and construction. Two current areas of focus are damage-tolerant, high-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composite materials, and bio-based fiber-reinforced polymeric composites that have a closed loop life-cycle. We are also developing methodologies for performance-based durability engineering with a focus on reducing the impacts of corrosion in structural concrete bridges and assessing the impact of climate change on the vulnerability of bridges to damage or collapse caused by scour. In the area of engineering education we are researching the impact of web-based activities on mechanics self-efficacy and achievement in an introductory course on solid mechanics.

  • Leonard Ortolano

    Leonard Ortolano

    UPS Foundation Professor of Civil Engineering in Urban and Regional Planning

    BioOrtolano is concerned with environmental and water resources policy and planning. His research stresses environmental policy implementation in developing countries and the role of non-governmental organizations in environmental management. His recent interests center on corporate environmental management.

  • Stephen Monismith

    Stephen Monismith

    Obayashi Professor in the School of Engineering and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHydrodynamics of lakes, estuaries, coral reefs, kelp forests and the coastal ocean

  • Jenna Davis

    Jenna Davis

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Davis’ research and teaching is focused at the interface of engineered water supply and sanitation systems and their users in developing countries. With a background in public health, infrastructure planning, and environmental science & engineering, Davis explores questions related to interventions that trigger household investment in water, sanitation, and hygiene improvements; the features of water and sanitation services that users value and why; and the health and economic impacts of improvements in water supply and sanitation. She has conducted field research in more than a dozen countries, including most recently Kenya, Mozambique, and Bangladesh.

  • Catherine Gorle

    Catherine Gorle

    Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGorle's research focuses on the development of predictive flow simulations to support the design of sustainable buildings and cities. Specific topics of interest are the coupling of large- and small-scale models and experiments to quantify uncertainties related to the variability of boundary conditions, the development of uncertainty quantification methods for low-fidelity models using high-fidelity data, and the use of field measurements to validate and improve computational predictions.