School of Engineering


Showing 11-20 of 360 Results

  • Larry Leifer

    Larry Leifer

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioLeifer's engineering design thinking research is focused on instrumenting design teams to understand, support, and improve design practice and theory. Specific issues include: design-team research methodology, global team dynamics, innovation leadership, interaction design, design-for-wellbeing, and adaptive mechatronic systems.

  • Marc Levenston

    Marc Levenston

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering and of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab's research involves the function, degeneration and repair of musculoskeletal soft tissues, with a focus on meniscal fibrocartilage and articular cartilage. We are particularly interested in the complex interactions between biophysical and biochemical cues in controlling cell behavior, the roles of these interactions in degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis, and development of tissue engineered 3D model systems for studying physical influences on primary and progenitor cells.

  • Sanjiva Lele

    Sanjiva Lele

    Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Lele's research combines numerical simulations with modeling to study fundamental unsteady flow phemonema, turbulence, flow instabilities, and flow-generated sound. Recent projects include shock-turbulent boundary layer interactions, supersonic jet noise, wind turbine aeroacoustics, wind farm modeling, aircraft contrails, multi-material mixing and multi-phase flows involving cavitation. He is also interested in developing high-fidelity computational methods for engineering applications.

  • Wei Cai

    Wei Cai

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioPredicting mechanical strength of materials through theory and simulations of defect microstructures across atomic, mesoscopic and continuum scales. Developing new atomistic simulation methods for long time-scale processes, such as crystal growth and self-assembly. Introducing magnetic field in quantum simulations of electronic structure and transport.

  • Charbel Farhat

    Charbel Farhat

    Vivian Church Hoff Professor of Aircraft Structures, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of the Army High Performance Computing Research Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCharbel Farhat and his Research Group (FRG) develop mathematical models, advanced computational algorithms, and high-performance software for the design and analysis of complex systems in aerospace, marine, mechanical, and naval engineering. They contribute major advances to Simulation-Based Engineering Science. Current engineering foci in research are on the nonlinear aeroelasticity and flight dynamics of Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAVs) with flexible flapping wings and N+3 aircraft with High Aspect Ratio (HAR) wings, layout optimization and additive manufacturing of wing structures, supersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators for Mars landing, and underwater acoustics. Current theoretical and computational emphases in research are on high-performance, multi-scale modeling for the high-fidelity analysis of multi-physics problems, high-order embedded boundary methods, uncertainty quantification, and efficient model-order reduction for time-critical applications such as design and active control.

  • Mark A. Cappelli

    Mark A. Cappelli

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Cappelli is the author of over 100 papers in these areas. He is currently a member of the Editorial Board of Diamond Films and Technology. He is also secretary of the Electric Propulsion Technical Committee of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics.

  • Parviz Moin

    Parviz Moin

    Franklin P. and Caroline M. Johnson Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioMoin is the founding director of the Center for Turbulence Research. Established in 1987 as a research consortium between NASA and Stanford, Center for Turbulence Research is devoted to fundamental studies of turbulent flows. Center of Turbulence Research is widely recognized as the international focal point for turbulence research, attracting diverse groups of researchers from engineering, mathematics and physics.

    Professor Moin pioneered the use of direct and Large Eddy Simulation techniques for the study of turbulence physics, control and modelling concepts and has written widely on the structure of turbulent shear flows. His current interests include: interaction of turbulent flows and shock waves, aerodynamic noise and hydroacoustics, aerooptics, combustion, numerical analysis, turbulence control, large eddy simulation and parallel computing. He is an Editor of the Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics and Associate Editor of Physics of Fluids, Journal of Computational Physics.

  • Adrian Lew

    Adrian Lew

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProf. Lew's interests lie in the broad area of computational solid mechanics. He is concerned with the fundamental design and mathematical analysis of material models and numerical algorithms.

    Currently the group is focused on the design of algorithms to simulate hydraulic fracturing. To this end we work on algorithms for time-integration embedded or immersed boundary methods.

  • Ellen Kuhl

    Ellen Kuhl

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestscomputaitonal simulation of brain development, cortical folding, computational simulation of cardiac disease, heart failure, left ventricular remodeling, electrophysiology, excitation-contraction coupling, computer-guided surgical planning, patient-specific simulation

  • Ronald Hanson

    Ronald Hanson

    Clarence J. and Patricia R. Woodard Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Hanson's research is in the field of laser diagnostics and sensors, shock wave physics and chemistry, laser spectroscopy, chemical kinetics and combustion, and propulsion science. He is the author of three book chapters and over archival refereed 500 refereed archival papers in these areas, and has served as a member of the editorial advisory boards of Combustion Science and Technology, Progress in Energy and Combustion Science, Shock Waves, the International Journal of Chemical Kinetics, and the Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer. He has served as Chair of the Gordon Conference on Combustion Diagnostics, Chair of the Western States Section of the Combustion Institute, and as the Program Co-Chair for the 30th Symposium (International) on Combustion, and he was the Chairman of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Stanford University from 1993 to 2003. Professor Hanson has been the principal advisor for more than 95 PhD graduates.