School of Engineering


Showing 31-40 of 75 Results

  • Anne Kiremidjian

    Anne Kiremidjian

    The C.L. Peck, Class of 1906 Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioKiremidjian’s research focuses in two main areas. The first is in earthquake hazard, risk, and resilience modeling. She works on structural component and systems reliability methods; structural damage evaluation models; and regional damage, loss and casualty estimation methods utilizing geographic information and database management systems for portfolios of buildings or spatially distributed lifeline systems assessment with ground motion and structure correlations. Her current research has focused on the development of time dependent hazard and risk models for resilience evaluation of hospitals, schools and financial instruments. In the area of time dependent risk assessment, she has developed models for damage estimation of deteriorating structures in varying environmental conditions.

    The second area of research focuses on the design and implementation of wireless sensor networks for health monitoring of structures under every-day loading conditions, and the development of robust and computationally efficient algorithms for structural damage diagnosis following extreme events that can be embedded in wireless sensing units. The damage algorithms utilize modern data science, machine learning and artificial intelligence methods.

  • Peter K. Kitanidis

    Peter K. Kitanidis

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioKitanidis develops methods for the solution of interpolation and inverse problems utilizing observations and mathematical models of flow and transport. He studies dilution and mixing of soluble substances in heterogeneous geologic formations, issues of scale in mass transport in heterogeneous porous media, and techniques to speed up the decay of pollutants in situ. He also develops methods for hydrologic forecasting and the optimization of sampling and control strategies.

  • Jeffrey R. Koseff

    Jeffrey R. Koseff

    Director, Sustainability Science and Practice, William Alden Campbell and Martha Campbell Professor in the School of Engineering, Professor of Oceans and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 03/31/2024

    BioJeff Koseff, founding co-director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, is an expert in the interdisciplinary domain of environmental fluid mechanics. His research falls in the interdisciplinary domain of environmental fluid mechanics and focuses on the interaction between physical and biological systems in natural aquatic environments. Current research activities are in the general area of environmental fluid mechanics and focus on: turbulence and internal wave dynamics in stratified flows, coral reef and sea-grass hydrodynamics, the role of natural systems in coastal protection, and flow through terrestrial and marine canopies. Most recently he has begun to focus on the interaction between gravity currents and breaking internal waves in the near-coastal environment, and the transport of marine microplastics. Koseff was formerly the Chair of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and the Senior Associate Dean of Engineering at Stanford, and has served on the Board of Governors of The Israel Institute of Technology, and has been a member of the Visiting Committees of the Civil and Environmental Engineering department at Carnegie-Mellon University, The Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research, and Cornell University. He has also been a member of review committees for the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan, The WHOI-MIT Joint Program, and the University of Minnesota Institute on the Environment. He is a former member of the Independent Science Board of the Bay/Delta Authority. He was elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2015, and received the Richard Lyman Award from Stanford University in the same year. In 2020 he was elected as a Fellow of the California Academy of Sciences. Koseff also serves as the Faculty Athletics Representative to the Pac-12 and NCAA for Stanford.

  • Kincho Law

    Kincho Law

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioProf. Law’s professional and research interests focus on the application of computational and information science in engineering. His work has dealt with various aspects of computational mechanics and structural dynamics, AI and machine learning, large scale database management, Internet and cloud computing, numerical methods and high performance computing. His research application areas include computer aided engineering, legal and engineering informatics, engineering enterprise integration, web services and supply chain management, monitoring and control of engineering systems, smart infrastructures, and smart manufacturing.

  • James Leckie

    James Leckie

    C.L. Peck, Class of 1906 Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioLeckie investigates chemical pollutant behavior in natural aquatic systems and engineered processes, specifically the environmental aspects of surface and colloid chemistry and the geochemistry of trace elements. New research efforts are focused on the development of techniques and models for assessment of exposure of humans to toxic chemicals. Specific attention has been paid to the evaluation of exposure of young children to toxic chemicals. Other interests include technology transfer and the development of environmental science programs in developing nations.

  • Michael Lepech

    Michael Lepech

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioUnsustainable energy and material consumption, waste production, and emissions are some of today’s most pressing global concerns. To address these concerns, civil engineers are now designing facilities that, for example, passively generate power, reuse waste, and are carbon neutral. These designs are based foremost on longstanding engineering theory. Yet woven within this basic knowledge must be new science and new technologies, which advance the field of civil engineering to the forefront of sustainability-focused design.

    My research develops fundamental engineering design concepts, models, and tools that are tightly integrated with quantitative sustainability assessment and service life modeling across length scales, from material scales to system scales, and throughout the early design, project engineering, construction, and operation life cycle phases of constructed facilities. My research follows the Sustainable Integrated Materials, Structures, Systems (SIMSS) framework. SIMSS is a tool to guide the multi-scale design of sustainable built environments, including multi-physics modeling informed by infrastructure sensing data and computational learning and feedback algorithms to support advanced digital-twinning of engineered systems. Thus, my research applies SIMMS through two complementary research thrusts; (1) developing high-fidelity quantitative sustainability assessment methods that enable civil engineers to quickly and probabilistically measure sustainability indicators, and (2) creating multi-scale, fundamental engineering tools that integrate with sustainability assessment and facilitate setting and meeting sustainability targets throughout the life cycle of constructed facilities.

    Most recently, my research forms the foundation of the newly created Stanford Center at the Incheon Global Campus (SCIGC) in South Korea, a university-wide research center examining the potential for smart city technologies to enhance the sustainability of urban areas. Located in the smart city of Songdo, Incheon, South Korea, SCIGC is a unique global platform to (i) advance research on the multi-scale design, construction, and operation of sustainable built environments, (ii) demonstrate to cities worldwide the scalable opportunities for new urban technologies (e.g., dense urban sensing networks, dynamic traffic management, autonomous vehicles), and (iii) improve the sustainability and innovative capacity of increasingly smarter cities globally.

    With an engineering background in civil and environmental engineering and material science (BSE, MSE, PhD), and business training in strategy and finance (MBA), I continue to explore to the intersection of entrepreneurship education, innovation capital training, and the potential of startups to more rapidly transfer and scale technologies to solve some of the world's most challenging problems.