School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 21-28 of 28 Results

  • Susan Holmes

    Susan Holmes

    Professor of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab has been developing tools for the analyses of complex data structures, extending work on multivariate data to structured multitable table that include graphs, networks and trees as well as categorical and continuous measurements.
    We created and support the Bioconductor package phyloseq for the analyses of microbial ecology data from the microbiome. We have specialized in developing interactive graphical visualization tools for doing reproducible research in biology.

  • Hector Hoyos

    Hector Hoyos

    Associate Professor of Iberian and Latin American Cultures

    BioHéctor Hoyos is an Associate Professor of Latin American literature and culture at Stanford University. He holds a Ph.D. in Romance Studies from Cornell University, and degrees in Philosophy and Literature from Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá. Hoyos’s research areas include visual culture and critical theory, as well as comparative and philosophical approaches to literature. His teaching covers various periods and subregions, with an emphasis on contemporary fiction and literary theory. His book, Beyond Bolaño: The Global Latin American Novel (Columbia UP, 2015), is the first monographic, theoretical study of Latin American novelistic representations of globalization of its kind. He edited the special journal issues "Theories of the Contemporary in South America" for Revista de Estudios Hispánicos (with Marília Librandi-Rocha, 2014) and “La cultura material en las literaturas y cultura iberoamericanas de hoy” for Cuadernos de literatura (2016).

    His current manuscript, Things with a History: Transcultural Materialism in Latin America develops the concept of transculturation as a way of integrating new and historical strands of materialism in the study of narrative. The study focuses on post-1989 authors who rethink materiality, such as the Cuban José Antonio Ponte, the Chilean Alejandro Zambra, and the Bolivian Blanca Wiethüchter. Hoyos received an Alexander von Humboldt Foundation fellowship in connection with this project. Articles by Hoyos have appeared in Comparative Literature Studies, Third Text, Chasqui, Novel: A Forum on Fiction, and Revista Iberoamericana, among others.

  • Scott Hutchins

    Scott Hutchins

    Lecturer

    BioScott Hutchins is a former Truman Capote fellow in the Wallace Stegner Program at Stanford University. His work has appeared in StoryQuarterly, Catamaran, Five Chapters, The Owls, The Rumpus, The New York Times, San Francisco Magazine and Esquire, and has been set to improvisational jazz. He is the recipient of two major Hopwood awards and the Andrea Beauchamp prize in short fiction. In 2006 and 2010, he was an artist-in-residence at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris. His novel A Working Theory of Love was a San Francisco Chronicle and Salon Best Book of 2012 and has been translated into nine languages.