School of Humanities and Sciences


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  • Roanne Kantor

    Roanne Kantor

    Assistant Professor of English

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGlobal Anglophone literature and its relationship to other literary traditions of the Global South. The conditions for interdisciplinary research in the humanities, especially literature's relationship with medicine and the social sciences.

  • Elizabeth Kessler

    Elizabeth Kessler

    Program Coordinator/Lecturer

    BioElizabeth Kessler’s research and teaching focus on twentieth and twenty-first century American visual culture. Her diverse interests include: the role of aesthetics, visual culture, and media in modern and contemporary science, especially astronomy; the interchange between technology and ways of seeing and representing; the history of photography; and the representation of fashion in different media. Her first book, Picturing the Cosmos: Hubble Space Telescope Images and the Astronomical Sublime, on the aesthetics of deep space images, was published in 2012. She’s currently writing on book on extraterrestrial time capsules, as well as developing a new project on fashion photography.

  • Matthew Kohrman

    Matthew Kohrman

    Associate Professor of Anthropology and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioMatthew Kohrman joined Stanford’s faculty in 1999. His research and writing bring multiple methods to bear on the ways health, culture, and politics are interrelated. Focusing on the People's Republic of China, he engages various intellectual terrains such as governmentality, gender theory, political economy, critical science studies, and embodiment. His first monograph, Bodies of Difference: Experiences of Disability and Institutional Advocacy in the Making of Modern China, examines links between the emergence of a state-sponsored disability-advocacy organization and the lives of Chinese men who have trouble walking. In recent years, Kohrman has been conducting research projects aimed at analyzing and intervening in the biopolitics of cigarette smoking and production. These projects expand upon analytical themes of Kohrman’s disability research and engage in novel ways techniques of public health.

  • Charles Kronengold

    Charles Kronengold

    Assistant Professor of Music

    BioSpecial Fields: Music since World War II; American Popular Music; Film and Media Theory; Comparative and Counter-Modernities; Music and Poetry. Current research concerns the ways that modern artistic genres condition, depict, embody and help to transform the activity of thinking.

    Articles and book-chapters published and forthcoming on Schoenberg, John Cage and Elliott Carter, soul, funk and disco, urban cinema, and such philosophical subjects as composers’ intentions, the role of accidents in theory, Theodor Adorno’s aesthetics, and the relevance of African American music to current debates about the "post-secular". Completing two books, Live Genres in Late Modernity and Different Methods, Different Signs: Crediting Thinking in Soul and Dance Music.

    Doctoral Fellowship at the UC-Humanities Research Institute; Society for the Humanities Fellowship at Cornell University.

    Taught music, film and cultural theory at Wayne State University. Undergraduate courses include World Music and Globalized Culture (Stanford), The Soul Tradition (Stanford), History of Music: 1800 to the Present (Wayne State), Music and Representation (Wayne State), Ethics and Communication (Wayne State). Graduate courses include Genres and Politics in the Late-Modern Work (Stanford), Analyzing Modern Song (Wayne State), Music and Urban Film (Wayne State), Sensing Thinking (Cornell).

  • Marci Kwon

    Marci Kwon

    Assistant Professor of Art and Art History

    BioMarci Kwon specializes in art and culture of the United States. Her research and teaching interests include the intersection of fine art and vernacular practice, theories of modernism, cultural exchange between Asia and the Americas, "folk" and "self-taught" art, and issues of race and objecthood. Her current book project considers the work of Joseph Cornell and the desire for a populist art in the mid-century United States. She is also working on a study of the intersections of art and anthropology in American modernism.