School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 11-20 of 52 Results

  • Haiyan Lee

    Haiyan Lee

    Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures and of Comparative Literature

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModern Chinese literature and popular culture; philosophy and literature; law and literature; cognitive science; affect studies; cultural studies of gender, sexuality, race, and religion; human-animal relations and environmental humanities

  • Joo-Mee Lee

    Joo-Mee Lee

    Lecturer, Music

    BioD.M.A. Boston University
    M.M., New England Conservatory
    BMus., Royal Academy of Music, London/King's College

    Violinist Joo-Mee Lee has taken on several roles in the Department of Music at Stanford University since the fall of 2014. She served as director of the Stanford New Ensemble. As a Lecturer, she teaches courses on Introductory Violin and Professional Development in Music, and also gives individual lessons. She has worked closely with the Stanford Symphony and Philharmonia, and has overseen the annual Concerto Competition.

    Previously, Lee served as an artist-in-residence and violin faculty at the University of Denver and at Colorado College. She also taught at Brandeis University, and was a sought-after teacher at the New England Conservatory Preparatory School in Boston.

    A graduate of the Royal Academy of Music in London and the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, Lee earned her Doctor of Musical Arts from Boston University where she was a Roman Totenberg Scholarship recipient. Her doctoral dissertation is entitled An Analytical Study of Three String Quartets of Bernard Rands.

    As a young musician, Lee was chosen to represent South Korea for the Jeunesses Musicales World Orchestra, which performed at the Berlin Philharmonie, Leipzig Gewandhaus, and Amsterdam Concertgebouw. She was a founding member of the Tonos String Quartet which won New England Conservatory’s Honor’s Quartet position. Her quartet took part in the Bank of America Celebrity Series with Rob Capilow, and performed live on Boston's WGBH radio among other concert venues throughout New England. The quartet was invited by the Joong-Ang Daily Newspaper to give a recital at Hoam Art Hall in Seoul, Korea.

    Lee has been invited to various music festivals including Aspen, Banff, and Sarasota where she performed solo and chamber recitals. While she was in graduate school, she won a position in the DaVinci Quartet and toured throughout the United States, giving concerts and masterclasses. Concurrently, she won a position in the Colorado Springs Symphony (now Philharmonic), and became a tenured member.

    As an avid new music advocate, Lee gave world premieres of chamber music and solo works by many contemporary composers. Among the composers with whom she has closely collaborated are Bernard Rands, Augusta Read Thomas, Samuel Adler, and Jennifer Higdon.

  • Whitney Legge

    Whitney Legge

    Master of Fine Arts Student, Documentary Film and Video

    BioWhitney Legge grew up in a small town on the coast of Maine and after graduating high school relocated to Guatemala to develop photography programs for at-risk youths. In 2008, Whitney was accepted to the San Francisco Art Institute where she received a Bachelor of Arts in Photography and honored with the John Collier Humanitarian Award. After graduation Whitney helped organize and lead DocuPhoto a public lecture series with acclaimed documentary photographers and filmmakers. She works for The Asia Foundation producing documentary short films. Whitney’s personal photography and films explores themes of family, identity, and social issues such as immigration and poverty.

  • Justin Leidwanger

    Justin Leidwanger

    Assistant Professor of Classics

    BioJustin Leidwanger’s research and fieldwork focus primarily on the role of maritime networks in structuring Roman socioeconomic life. These interests lead him to spend more time in, rather than around, the waters of the Mediterranean, where his fieldwork explores the shipwrecks and ports that provide primary archaeological evidence for the modes and mechanisms of communication and exchange. In 2012, he initiated the Marzamemi Maritime Heritage Project, which combines survey and excavation with maritime heritage education and museum and tourism development at the site of several ancient shipwrecks off southeast Sicily, a focal point of which has been recent excavation of the famous late antique Marzamemi “church wreck”. Since 2011, he has co-directed annual investigations in the Archaic through late Roman harbors of Burgaz, off the Datça peninsula in southwest Turkey, with Elizabeth S. Greene (Brock University) and Numan Tuna (Middle East Technical University). Prior to this, he directed maritime landscape surveys off the coast of Cyprus (2003-2009). Over the past six years, he has been involved in issues of ethical stewardship, responsible management, public involvement, and collaboration in maritime archaeological investigations. On this topic, he has co-authored a number of recent articles and co-organized a series of international workshops and conferences in collaboration with the Penn Cultural Heritage Center, where he is active as a Fellow. In the Classics Department, he teaches courses on Roman archaeology, Greco-Roman architecture and engineering, Mediterranean seafaring and network connectivity, archaeological ethics, and the ancient economy. As faculty at the Stanford Archaeology Center, his lab serves as a research base for field projects as well as a center for pottery analysis (petrography and portable XRF).