School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 81-87 of 87 Results

  • Kathryn Lum

    Kathryn Lum

    Associate Professor of Religious Studies and, by courtesy, of History

    BioKathryn Gin Lum specializes in American religious history. Her research and teaching interests focus on the lived ramifications of religious beliefs, and particularly on the relationship between religious and racial othering in the United States. She is author of Damned Nation: Hell in America from the Revolution to Reconstruction (Oxford University Press 2014) and Heathen: Religion and Race in American History (Harvard University Press 2022). She is co-editor, with Paul Harvey, of The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Race in American History (Oxford University Press 2018). She is affiliated with the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CCSRE) and is Director of the American Religions in a Global Context Initiative (argc.stanford.edu) at Stanford.

    Professor Gin Lum received her B.A. in History from Stanford and her Ph.D. in History from Yale.

  • Liqun Luo

    Liqun Luo

    Ann and Bill Swindells Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study how neurons are organized into specialized circuits to perform specific functions and how these circuits are assembled during development. We have developed molecular-genetic and viral tools, and are combining them with transcriptomic, proteomic, physiological, and behavioral approaches to study these problems. Topics include: 1) assembly of the fly olfactory circuit; 2) assembly of neural circuits in the mouse brain; 3) organization and function of neural circuits; 4) Tool development.

  • Ivan Lupic

    Ivan Lupic

    Assistant Professor of English

    BioIvan Lupić specializes in Shakespeare and Renaissance literature. He is particularly interested in interdisciplinary and transnational approaches informed by the study of primary sources and responding to the multilingual and multicultural nature of the Renaissance literary archive. His most recent book, concerned with counsel and subjectivity in early modern English drama, was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2019 under the title Subjects of Advice: Drama and Counsel from More to Shakespeare. It offers an original account of the foundational role that counsel played in the development of Renaissance drama.

    In 2020 Lupić will be a Berenson fellow at Villa I Tatti, the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies in Florence, as well as a Frances A. Yates fellow at the Warburg Institute in London, where he will be working on a new book, provisionally titled The Illyrian Renaissance: Literature in the European Borderlands. He has also been developing a book project on Shakespeare and the End of Editing, focused on the history of Shakespeare editing in the context of manuscript studies. Lupić has published widely in fields ranging from Shakespeare translation and contemporary reception to Renaissance scribal culture, book history, and comparative literary studies.

    Lupić takes his academic motto from A Groatsworth of Wit (1592): "To learning and law there's no greater foe than they that nothing know."

    To learn more about his publications, please visit https://stanford.academia.edu/IvanLupi%C4%87 or go to https://english.stanford.edu/people/ivan-lupi%C4%87

  • Pawel Lutomski

    Pawel Lutomski

    Lecturer

    BioPaweł ("Pavo") Lutomski holds a Ph.D. in German Studies from Stanford and a J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School. He has taught in the Program in International Relations at Stanford since 2002. He also worked as an attorney for such organizations as the international divisions of The Nature Conservancy and Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund (now Earthjustice), and has consulted on global civic education. His subject areas are international law and international relations, forced migration, atrocities and reconciliation, and German-Polish relations. He is co-editor of a volume entitled "Population Resettlement in International Conflicts: A Comparative Study." Having spent the first 21 years of his life in Communist Poland, he left his home country to live first in (West) Berlin, then in Sweden, before coming to the U.S. He calls himself a “grateful American citizen” and is a very happy San Francisco resident.