School of Humanities and Sciences


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  • Kevin Paul Madore

    Kevin Paul Madore

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioBackground and Research:

    I'm a Postdoctoral Fellow in Psychology at Stanford with Anthony Wagner and funded by an extramural NRSA F32 from NIA. My K99/R00 from NINDS has also recently been funded. I received a PhD in Psychology at Harvard with Dan Schacter in 2017 where I was extramurally funded by the Beinecke Scholarship and Sackler Psychobiology Program, and a BA in Psychology and History from Middlebury College in 2011.

    My research program focuses on memory preparedness, or what can be conceptualized as 'readiness to remember'. Preparatory processes at play before we engage in remembering may affect whether and how we remember. I take a three-pronged approach to this topic, examining effects within the individual, between individuals, and between groups. With basic science and translational science aims, my research addresses the following questions using a combination of behavioral (task and survey), eyetracking (pupillometry and gaze), and neural (EEG, fMRI, concurrent EEG-fMRI, TMS) methods:

    1) How do preparatory processes in the moment and minutes before remembering impact memory?
    2) How do these preparatory processes impact functions of memory, such as prospection and creativity?
    3) How do individual differences in preparatory processes relate to memory ability?
    4) How do preparatory processes contribute to age-related memory change?
    5) How does engagement with the modern media landscape relate to preparatory processes and memory?

    Updates and News:

    Fall 2021: My K99/R00 grant from NINDS on neurocomputational mechanisms of attention, goals, and memory has been funded. My training goals are to learn and execute computational modeling and bioengineered closed-loop task designs.

    Fall 2020: My postdoc work on attention, goals, memory, and media multitasking is now published at Nature.

  • Javier Mejia

    Javier Mejia

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    BioJavier Mejia is an economist whose work focuses on the intersection between social networks and economic history. His interests extend to topics on entrepreneurship and political economy with a geographical specialty in Latin America and the Middle East. He received a Ph.D. in Economics from Los Andes University. He has been a Postdoctoral Associate and Lecturer at New York University--Abu Dhabi and a Visiting Scholar at the University of Bordeaux.

    Most of Javier’s research explores how social interactions have shaped the economy in the long term. He brings together theoretical and empirical methods from economics and conceptual tools from anthropology to the study of history. This has led him to explore an extensive set of historical objects. He has studied entrepreneurs in Colombia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, industrial elites in Morocco in the late 20th century, tribal societies in North Africa in the 19th century, early Muslim communities in the Levant and the Arabian Peninsula between the 7th and 9th centuries, and political elites in Colombia and the US in the early 19th century.

    Javier has teaching experience in multicultural environments, having taught at universities in Latin America, the United States, and the Middle East. He has taught courses on economic growth, economic history, and economic theory. At Stanford, he offers two courses that jointly provide an overview of economic evolution from a global-history and moral-philosophy perspective. On the one hand, Wealth of Nations studies the origins of economic development, the moral dilemmas underneath the development process, and the path that led to the configuration of the modern global economy. On the other hand, Societal Collapse studies the causes of economic decline, the social and political consequences of that decline, and the path that led to the disappearance of some of the most prosperous societies in human history.

    Javier is a regular contributor to different news outlets. Currently, he is a Forbes Magazine op-ed columnist.

  • Pardis Miri

    Pardis Miri

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioPardis Miri, PhD, recently received her doctorate in computer science, in the area of human computer interaction, from University of California Santa Cruz. As a PhD student, she spent the last 3 years of her training at Stanford University under the supervision of Dr. Marzullo, Dr. Gross, and Dr. Isbister. For her dissertation, she took a multidisciplinary approach in using technology for affect regulation. More specifically, she explored the placement and pattern, and personalization of a vibrotactile breathing pacer system that she developed during her graduate studies. Her work was funded by the National Science Foundation and Intel labs. Prior to being a Ph.D. student, Miri earned her Master’s degree in computer science from the University of California San Diego in the area of Systems and Networking. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University conducting research in using vibrotactile technology to aid affect regulation in neurotypical and neurodiverse populations.