School of Humanities and Sciences


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  • Kevin Paul Madore

    Kevin Paul Madore

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychology

    BioI'm a Postdoctoral Fellow in Psychology at Stanford with Anthony Wagner and funded by an extramural NRSA F32 from NIA/NIH. I received a PhD in Psychology at Harvard with Dan Schacter in 2017 where I was extramurally funded by the Beinecke Scholarship and Sackler Psychobiology Program, and a BA in Psychology and History from Middlebury College in 2011.

    My research program focuses on memory preparedness, or what can be conceptualized as 'readiness to remember'. Preparatory processes at play before we engage in remembering may affect whether and how we remember. I take a three-pronged approach to this topic, examining effects within the individual, between individuals, and between groups. With basic science and translational science aims, my research addresses the following questions using a combination of behavioral, eyetracking (pupillometry), and neural (EEG, fMRI, concurrent EEG-fMRI, TMS) methods:

    1) How do preparatory processes in the moment and minutes before remembering impact memory?
    2) How do these preparatory processes impact functions of memory, such as prospection and creativity?
    3) How do individual differences in preparatory processes relate to memory ability?
    4) How do preparatory processes contribute to age-related memory change?
    5) How does engagement with the modern media landscape relate to preparatory processes and memory?

    Fall 2020: My postdoc work on attention, goals, memory, and media multitasking is now published at Nature.

  • Pardis Miri

    Pardis Miri

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychology

    BioPardis Miri, PhD, recently received her doctorate in computer science, in the area of human computer interaction, from University of California Santa Cruz. As a PhD student, she spent the last 3 years of her training at Stanford University under the supervision of Dr. Marzullo, Dr. Gross, and Dr. Isbister. For her dissertation, she took a multidisciplinary approach in using technology for affect regulation. More specifically, she explored the placement and pattern, and personalization of a vibrotactile breathing pacer system that she developed during her graduate studies. Her work was funded by the National Science Foundation and Intel labs. Prior to being a Ph.D. student, Miri earned her Master’s degree in computer science from the University of California San Diego in the area of Systems and Networking. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University conducting research in using vibrotactile technology to aid affect regulation in neurotypical and neurodiverse populations.