School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 51-60 of 65 Results

  • Dale Miller

    Dale Miller

    Class of 1968/Ed Zschau Professor in the Graduate School of Business and Professor of Psychology

    BioProfessor Miller’s research focuses on various aspects of social and group behavior. Long interested in social norms, he has investigated the processes underlying the development, transmission, and modification of group norms. He has been especially interested in the emergence and perpetuation of social norms that lack broad support. A second focus of his research is the origins of people’s commitment to social justice and the role that justice plays in social life. He has also studied and written on the sources and cures of cultural conflict.

    Professor Miller has served on the editorial board of several scientific journals and currently serves on the editorial board of several scientific journals and currently serves on the editorial boards of the Social Justice Research, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and Psychological Inquiry. He has received numerous awards and has been a Visiting Fellow at both the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (Stanford) and the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton).

    At Stanford University since 2002, he is the Class of 1968 / Ed Zschau Professor of Organizational Behavior. He currently teaches the MBA course on Critical Analytical Thinking. He also is the Faculty Director of Stanford’s Center of Social Innovation.

  • Pardis Miri

    Pardis Miri

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychology

    BioPardis Miri, PhD, recently received her doctorate in the area of human computer interaction from University of California Santa Cruz. As a PhD student, she spent the last 3 years of her training at Stanford University under the supervision of Dr. Marzullo, Dr. Gross, and Dr. Isbister. For her dissertation, she took a multidisciplinary approach in using technology for affect regulation. More specifically, she explored the placement and pattern, and personalization of a vibrotactile breathing pacer system that she developed during her graduate studies. Her work was funded by the National Science Foundation and Intel labs. Prior to being a Ph.D. student, Miri earned her Master’s degree in computer science from the University of California San Diego in the area of Systems and Networking. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University conducting research in using vibrotactile technology to aid affect regulation in neurotypical and neurodiverse populations.

  • Terry Moe

    Terry Moe

    William Bennett Munro Professor in Political Science, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioTerry M. Moe is the William Bennett Munro Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution.

    He has written extensively on public bureaucracy and the presidency, as well as the theory of political institutions more generally. His articles include "The New Economics of Organization," "The Politicized Presidency," "The Politics of Bureaucratic Structure," "Political Institutions: The Neglected Side of the Story," "Presidents, Institutions, and Theory," “The Presidential Power of Unilateral Action” (with William Howell), “Power and Political Institutions,” and “Political Control and the Power of the Agent.”

    He has also written extensively on the politics of American education. His newest book, Special Interest: Teachers Unions and America’s Public Schools (2011), provides the first comprehensive study of this nation’s teachers unions, their exercise of power in collective bargaining and politics, and its consequences for the public schools. His past work on education includes Politics, Markets, and America's Schools (1990) and Liberating Learning: Technology, Politics, and the Future of American Education (2009), both with John E. Chubb, and Schools, Vouchers, and the American Public (2001).

  • Benoit Monin

    Benoit Monin

    Bowen H. and Janice Arthur McCoy Professor in Leadership Values and Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research deals with how people address threats to the self in interpersonal situations: How they avoid feeling prejudiced, how they construe other people's behavior to make to their own look good, how they deal with dissonance, how they affirm a threatened identity, how they resent the goodness of others when it makes them look bad, etc. I study these issues in the context of social norms, the self, and morality, broadly defined.

  • Craig Moodie

    Craig Moodie

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy doctoral research primarily explored neurometric encoding and decoding based on the brain's in-vivo functional connectivity. Most of my projects centered around developing and implementing novel multivariate functional connectivity approaches for fcMRI research. I applied these techniques to two behavioral genetics studies of cognitive processes, MR pulse sequence development and implementation, as well as the development of psychiatric diagnostic tools for schizophrenia, Parkinson's and substance abuse. The post-doctoral research that I am now conducting extends this work, in that I am currently developing multivariate models that add population genetics via extended pedigrees, and structural connectivity to the neuropsychological and functional connectivity parameters that I had previously been assessing. The overarching goal is to be able to use this entire complement of data to understanding the genetic and neurobiological substrates of the functioning and dysfunction of higher-order cognitive processes. By advancing our understanding the interaction and distribution of cognitive and neurobiological functionality, this work should inform the development of both individualized medicine strategies and epidemiological models of psychopathology.