School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 10 Results

  • Joe Nation

    Joe Nation

    Professor of the Practice of Public Policy

    BioJoe Nation is a Professor of the Practice of Public Policy at Stanford University, where he directs the graduate student Practicum in public policy and teaches policy courses on climate change, health care, and California state issues. He also serves as the Grossman-Kennedy Fellow in Human Biology, teaching environmental and health policy. His current research is focused on public finance and public employee pensions. Nation sits on the board of Advisors for Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service and is a Faculty Affiliate at Stanford’s Center on Longevity. He has consulted for RAND for nearly 30 years since his graduation from Pardee RAND Graduate School (PRGS) in 1989.

    From 1992-2000, he served on the Marin Water Board, including two terms as President. From 2000-2006, he represented Marin and Southern Sonoma Counties in the California State Assembly. He was the principal co-author of AB 32, California’s Global Warmings Solutions Act. Nation received a Ph.D. in Public Policy Analysis from PRGS.

  • Rosamond Naylor

    Rosamond Naylor

    William Wrigley Professor, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Activities:
    My research focuses on the environmental and equity dimensions of intensive food production systems, and the food security dimensions of low-input systems. I have been involved in a number of field-level research projects around the world and have published widely on issues related to climate impacts on agriculture, distributed irrigation systems for diversified cropping, nutrient use and loss in agriculture, biotechnology, aquaculture and livestock production, biofuels development, food price volatility, and food policy analysis.

    Teaching Activities:
    I teach courses on the world food economy, food and security, aquaculture science and policy, human society and environmental change, and food-water-health linkages. These courses are offered to graduate and undergraduate students through the departments of Earth System Science, Economics, History, and International Relations.

    Professional Activities:
    William Wrigley Professor of Earth Science (2015 - Present); Professor in Earth System Science (2009-present); Director, Stanford Center on Food Security and the Environment (2005-2018); Associate Professor of Economics by courtesy (2000-present); William Wrigley Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the Woods Institute for the Environment (2007-2015); Trustee, The Nature Conservancy CA program (2012-present); Member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the Beijer Institute for Ecological Economics in Stockholm (2011-present), for the Aspen Global Change Institute (2011-present), and for the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program (2012-present); Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow in Environmental Science and Public Policy (1999); Pew Fellow in Conservation and the Environment (1994). Associate Editor for the Journal on Food Security (2012-present). Editorial board member for Aquaculture-Environment Interactions (2009-present) and Global Food Security (2012-present).

  • Reviel Netz

    Reviel Netz

    Suppes Professor of Greek Mathematics and Astronomy and Professor, by courtesy, of Philosophy and of History

    BioNetz's main field is the history of pre-modern mathematics. His research involves the wider issues of the history of cognitive practices, e.g. visual culture, the history of the book, and literacy and numeracy. His books from Cambridge University Press include The Shaping of Deduction in Greek Mathematics: a Study in Cognitive History (1999, Runciman Award), The Transformation of Early Mediterranean Mathematics: From Problems to Equations (2004), and Ludic Proof: Greek Mathematics and the Alexandrian Aesthetic (2009).

    He is also the author of the translation and commentary of the works of Archimedes, also with CUP, a three-volume work of which the first has appeared, The Two Books on Sphere and Cylinder (2004). Together with Nigel Wilson, he prepares the edition of the recently rediscovered Archimedes Palimpsest (evidence from which already gave rise to two major discoveries: a text showing actual infinity in Archimedes, published in SCIAMVS 2001-2002, and a text showing, possibly, combinatorics in Archimedes, published in SCIAMVS 2004.) Two volumes, Transcription and Critical Edition, are forthcoming from the British Academy, of which the transcription is already available online. His popular book on the Archimedes Palimpsest Project, The Archimedes Codex, (co-authored with William Noel, Neumann Prize) was published by Widenfeld and Nicolson, 2007, and is translated into 20 languages.

    Related to his research in cognitive history is his interest in ecological history, and he has published Barbed Wire: an Ecology of Modernity (Wesleyan University Press, 2004, finalist for PEN award). Reviel Netz is also a poet (Adayin Bahuc, 1999 Shufra: Tel Aviv, AMOS prize), one of a group of Hebrew poets active today whose work revives formal verse and he is the co-author, together with his wife, the Israeli author Maya Arad, of a collection of essays on Israeli literature, Positions of Stress (Meqom Hata'am, 2008 Axuzat Bayit: Tel Aviv).

  • William Newsome

    William Newsome

    Harman Family Provostial Professor and Professor of Neurobiology and, by courtesy, of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeural processes that mediate visual perception and visually-based decision making. Influence of reward history on decision making.

  • Dzuong Nguyen

    Dzuong Nguyen

    Lecturer

    BioProf. Dzuong Nguyen was a graduate from the Law School, University of Saigon, South Vietnam. While in college, Mr. Nguyen has served as an Admin. Assistant at the US Agency for International Development (US AID) in Saigon.
    During the wartime, he served as an Air Police Lieutenant in the South Vietnamese Air Force.
    After the fall of Saigon in 1975, he was left behind and ended up spending 5 years in the so-called “re-education” camps under the new Communist regime. Dzuong Nguyen managed to escape from the camp and fled by boat to Thailand in 1980. He was resettled in America in Aug. 1980.
    Two years after being resettled in America, Mr. Nguyen earned his Master’s degree in Education from the University of San Francisco and started his career by teaching English as a Second Language and Math at Galileo High School, San Francisco.
    Currently, Mr. Nguyen is teaching Vietnamese Grammar and Literature at Stanford University, De Anza College and College of Alameda.
    In addition to the role of a language instructor, Mr. Nguyen strongly advocates for Human Rights, Democracy and Freedom for Vietnam.
    For the last 30 years, Mr. Nguyen has been deeply involved and elected into many chairmanship functions within the Vietnamese community in the Bay Area.
    Dzuong Nguyen has received hundreds of recognition and awards from the government, media, and the community, including:
    “Profile of Excellence” award from ABC Channel 7 San Francisco,
    “The Most Effective Community Leader” from California Gov. Pete Wilson,
    “Minority Small Business Advocate of the Year” from (Federal) Small Business Administration (SBA)
    And many more…
    For the last ten years, Mr. Nguyen has always been evaluated and rated highest on the scale of performance. He has a great affection for his students and vice-versa, his students greatly respect Mr. Nguyen's talents and his behavior. Mr. Nguyen's students are benefited from his teaching, not only for language skills but also for a broader knowledge of cultural aspects and history.

  • Paul Nissler

    Paul Nissler

    Lecturer

    BioPaul grew up in a German-heritage family outside of Madison,Wisconsin. He attended UW-Madison for his undergraduate studies and did his doctoral work at the Pennsylvania State University. He has spent extensive time, studying, researching, working, and engaging professionally, across the span of the German-speaking world.

    In the Fall of 2005, Paul came to Stanford as a Lecturer, teaching both Spanish and German for numerous years. Since 2009 he has additionally served as the German Language Coordinator.

    Dr. Nissler completed ACTFL OPI training in both Spanish and German and has been certified as an oral and written proficiency tester in German since 2010.

    He is also active in the local Bay area German community. He has engaged with local German-schools and previously served as the AATG Testing Chair (currently committee member) and is the current President of the Northern California Chapter of the AATG.

    Paul publishes and presents at academic conferences, both nationally and internationally. He is very enthusiastic about teaching and language learning.

  • Roger Noll

    Roger Noll

    Professor of Economics, Emeritus

    BioRoger G. Noll is professor of economics emeritus at Stanford University. Noll also is a Senior Fellow and member of the Advisory Board at the American Antitrust Institute. Noll received a B.S. with honors in mathematics from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph. D. in economics from Harvard University. Prior to joining Stanford, Noll was a Senior Economist at the President's Council of Economic Advisers, a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, and Institute Professor of Social Science and Chair of the Division of Humanities and Social Sciences at the California Institute of Technology. At Stanford, Noll served as Associate Dean for Social Sciences in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Director of the Public Policy Program, and Senior Fellow in the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research where he also was Director of the Program in Regulatory Policy and Director of the Stanford Center for International Development.

    Noll is the author or co-author of seventeen books and over three hundred articles and reviews. His primary research interests include technology policy; antitrust, regulation and privatization policies in both advanced and developing economies; economic aspects of public law (administrative law, judicial processes, and statutory interpretation); and the economics of sports and entertainment. Among Noll’s published books are Economic Aspects of Television Regulation (1973), Government and the Sports Business (1974), The Technology Pork Barrel (1991), Constitutional Reform in California (1995), Sports, Jobs and Taxes (1997), Challenges to Research Universities (1998), and Economic Reform in India (2013).

    Noll has been a member of the advisory boards of the U.S. Department of Energy, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and National Science Foundation. He also has been a member of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and the Board on Science, Technology and Economic Policy of the National Research Council, and of the California Council on Science and Technology.

    Noll has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, the annual book award of the National Association of Educational Broadcasters, the Rhodes Prize for undergraduate education at Stanford, the Distinguished Service Award of the Public Utilities Research Center, the Alfred E. Kahn Distinguished Career Award from the American Antitrust Institute, the Distinguished Member Award from the Transportation and Public Utilities Group of the American Economic Association, Economist of the Year from Global Competition Review, and the American Antitrust Institute award for Distinguished Achievement by an Economist in Antitrust Litigation.