School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 241-260 of 263 Results

  • Eva Prionas

    Eva Prionas

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests* Innovative technologies and their uses in optimizing the teaching and learning of the Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTLS).

    * Teacher Education and the field of the LCTLs.

    * Modern Greek Language Education

  • Jonathan Pritchard

    Jonathan Pritchard

    Professor of Genetics and of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in a broad range of problems at the interface of genomics and evolutionary biology. One current focus of the lab is in understanding how genetic variation impacts gene regulation and complex traits. We also have long-term interests in using genetic data to learn about population structure, history and adaptation, especially in humans.

    FOR UP-TO-DATE DETAILS ON MY LAB AND RESEARCH, PLEASE SEE: http://pritchardlab.stanford.edu

  • Robert N. Proctor

    Robert N. Proctor

    Professor of History and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTobacco and cigarette design; human origins and evolution; changing concepts of health and disease; medical history and medical politics

  • Sarah Prodan

    Sarah Prodan

    Assistant Professor of French and Italian

    BioSarah Prodan is an Italianist, an early modernist and a Michelangelo scholar. Her primary research and teaching contributions center on Italian literature and cultural history of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

    Her first monograph, Michelangelo’s Christian Mysticism: Spirituality, Poetry and Art in Sixteenth-Century Italy (Cambridge University Press, 2014), was awarded the Jeanne and Aldo Scaglione Publication Award for a Manuscript in Italian Literary Studies by the Modern Language Association in 2013. Literary, cultural and historical in scope, this study considers the Florentine artist’s poetics and aesthetics in light of medieval and Renaissance Augustinianism, lay religious culture, and the Italian Reformation, respectively, to provide a more nuanced understanding of Michelangelo’s spirituality and how it functioned.

    Her current book project, Poetics of Piety: Religious Reading, Writing and Identity in Early Modern Italy, builds on this earlier work to consider the ways in which male and female poets of devotional verse engaged the Word in text, image, and imagination in the sixteenth century. Combining diachronic and synchronic approaches to the study of early modern Italian verse, this project examines relations among religious practice and poetic form in the pre-Tridentine and post-Tridentine periods.

    Other book-length projects include Friendship and Sociability in Premodern Europe: Contexts, Concepts and Expressions (Toronto: CRRS, 2014), a co-edited volume that explores ideas and instances of friendship in premodern Europe through a well-ordered series of investigations into amity in discrete social and cultural contexts related to some of the most salient moments and expressions of European history and civilization: the courtly love tradition, Renaissance humanism; the Reformation, the Counter-Reformation and the attendant confessionalization and wars of religion; Jesuit missions; the colonization of America; and lastly, expanding trade patterns in the Age of Discovery.

    Prior to joining Stanford, Prodan was a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of History at Harvard University and at the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies at Victoria University in the University of Toronto, where she designed and taught early modern cultural history courses and lectured on Italian language and literature.

    In parallel to her scholarly pursuits, Prodan is completing a work of historical fiction inspired by her academic research. Taking the dramatic events of the French invasion of Italy in the fall of 1494 as its context, Imminence: Florence, 1494 recounts the riveting and tumultuous history of the dangerously divided Florentine city-state through the experiences of a lay female visionary temporarily resident in an elite nunnery tied to the highest echelons of political power. An imagined female story seamlessly inserted into a famously documented male history, Imminence weaves strands of verisimilitude with threads of reality, to offer a tapestry of fiction and non-fiction that touches on persistent human challenges – personal, social, and political. An exercise in empathic historical imagination, this novel explores women’s political, social, cultural, and religious history during the exciting and pivotal moment of the Italian Renaissance.

  • Shannon Pufahl

    Shannon Pufahl

    Lecturer

    BioShannon Pufahl is a Jones Lecturer in the Creative Writing Program. She teaches fiction, creative nonfiction, and writing across genres. She was a Stegner Fellow in fiction at Stanford, where she received a Centennial award, the University's highest honor for teaching assistants. She has published essays in The Threepenny Review and elsewhere, on topics ranging from John Brown and the Antebellum Midwest, to personal memoir. Her novel, On Swift Horses, about gambling, sex, and the post-war American West, is forthcoming from Riverhead Books.

    Shannon is also a PhD candidate in American Literature and Culture at the University of California, Davis. Her dissertation traces the animal welfare movement in the U.S. from its origins in the 19th-century, through the intense debates about animal life, suffering, and intelligence at century's end, and into the young adult animal novels of the early 20th-century.

    She is the co-coordinator of The Writer's Studio, a weekly workshop series sponsored by the Creative Writing Program, the Stanford Storytelling Project, and the Hume Center for Writing and Speaking. She also teaches in the Stanford Arts Intensive and online in Summer Session.

  • Giuseppe Puglisi

    Giuseppe Puglisi

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsData-analysis for Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization experiments, map-making procedures, component separation algorithms and assessment of systematics.

    Modelling Galactic Emission at the microwave and sub-millimetric frequencies. Modelling the polarized emission coming from synchrotron, thermal dust, molecular line emissions that can be polarized and contaminate the CMB signal.

    Modelling polarized Extra-Galactic Radio Source emission.