School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 22 Results

  • Gregory Wait

    Gregory Wait

    Senior Lecturer in Music

    BioGREGORY WAIT, the Billie Bennett Achilles Director of Vocal Studies on the Stanford University Music Department faculty, maintains a dynamic and enthusiastic teaching schedule. In recognition of his commitment to the principles of successful higher education, Wait received the Deans' Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1998, and was honored by his students and colleagues for his years of service to the university. In 2010 he was an ABBY honoree from the Arts Council Silicon Valley for his arts leadership in the Santa Clara valley. During his thirty year tenure as conductor of the Stanford Memorial Church Choir, the membership commissioned Stanford alumnus Kirke Mechem to compose his Missa Brevis Trinity as a tribute to his direction. As tenor soloist, he has made his mark in recital, in opera, and on the concert stage, having made his Carnegie Hall debut singing the Requiem of Alfred Schnittke. Hailed as one of the leading exponents of (Benjamin) Britten's vocal works, he premiered works by Lou Harrison and William Kraft, and gave the first American performance of Alessandro Scarlatti's Magnificat from his Vespers of St. Cecilia. He served as soloist at the prestigious Carmel Bach Festival for over fifteen seasons, and came to national recognition as tenor soloist in the Davies Symphony Hall (San Francisco) televised Sing-it-Yourself Messiah on PBS, and has subsequently concertized throughout the United States, from the Anchorage Music Festival to Santa Fe. He recently conducted and sang the Evangelist in Bach's Matthus-passion. Now in his twenty-third season as music director of Schola Cantorum, he has received accolades from critics and the public alike for his vivid interpretations of choral masterworks, and for his commitment to the performance of new music. Under Wait's leadership, Schola Cantorum has commissioned and performed numerous premieres, notably the Missa Gaia (Mass for the Earth) by Libby Larson and, most recently, Alva Henderson and Dana Gioia's Winter Requiem. As director of the Congregational Oratorio Society, he has performed countless choral/orchestral works, and has led seven European tours in performances at historic venues throughout England, France, Italy, Switzerland, Russia and Scandinavia. Mr. Wait is also a choral arranger, and is frequently engaged as a lecturer and clinician for choral and vocal festivals.

  • Ban Wang

    Ban Wang

    William Haas Professor in Chinese Studies and Professor of Comparative Literature

    BioWilliam Haas Professor in Chinese Studies, Stanford University
    Departments of East Asian Languages and Comparative Literature
    Yangtze River Chair Professor, Simian Institute of Advanced Study,
    East China Normal University

  • Ge Wang

    Ge Wang

    Associate Professor of Music and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioGe Wang is an Associate Professor at Stanford University in the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). He specializes in the art of design and computer music — researching programming languages and interactive software design for music, interaction design, mobile music, laptop orchestras, expressive design of virtual reality, aesthetics of music technology design, and education at the intersection of computer science and music. Ge is the author of the ChucK music programming language, the founding director of the Stanford Laptop Orchestra (SLOrk). Ge is also the Co-founder of Smule (reaching over 200 million users), and the designer of the iPhone's Ocarina and Magic Piano. Ge is a 2016 Guggenheim Fellow, and the author of ARTFUL DESIGN: TECHNOLOGY IN SEARCH OF THE SUBLIME—a book on design and technology, art and life‚ published by Stanford University Press in 2018 (see https://artful.design/)

  • Amir Weiner

    Amir Weiner

    Associate Professor of History

    BioAmir Weiner’s research concerns Soviet history with an emphasis on the interaction between totalitarian politics, ideology, nationality, and society. His first book, Making Sense of War analyzed the role and impact of the cataclysm of the Second World War on Soviet society and politics. His current project, Wild West, Window to the West engages the territories between the Baltic and Black Seas that were annexed by the Soviet Union in 1939-40, from the initial occupation to present. Professor Weiner has taught courses on modern Russian history; the Second World War; the Origins of Totalitarianism; War and Society in Modern Europe; Modern Ukrainian History; and History and Memory.

  • Frederick Weldy

    Frederick Weldy

    Senior Lecturer in Music

    BioStudied with Charles Fisher, Marion Owen, Martin Katz, and Eugene Bossart.

    Performances throughout U.S., Canada, and Europe; debut at Carnegie Recital Hall, New York; soloist with the Rochester Philharmonic, Utah Symphony, symphonies in Warsaw, Costa Rica.

    Prizewinner in Gina Bachauer International Piano Competition; winner, East and West Artists International Auditions and Music at La Gesse Foundation Fellowship

    Recipient of National Endowment for the Arts Solo Recitalist Fellowship.

  • Leif Wenar

    Leif Wenar

    Olive H. Palmer Professor in the Humanities and Professor, by courtesy, of Law

    BioLeif Wenar is a political philosopher. After receiving his AB at Stanford, he earned his PhD at Harvard, worked in Britain, and returned to Stanford in 2020.

    He is the author of Blood Oil: Tyrants, Violence, and the Rules that Run the World and the author-meets-critics volume Beyond Blood Oil: Philosophy, Policy, and the Future. He is also the author of the entries for ‘John Rawls’ and ‘Rights’ in The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. His articles have appeared in Mind, Analysis, Philosophy & Public Affairs, Ethics, The Journal of Political Philosophy, The Columbia Law Review, and The Philosopher’s Annual. He co-edited Giving Well: The Ethics of Philanthropy, as well as an autobiographical volume by the economist FA Hayek.

    He has been a Visiting Professor at the Stanford Center on Ethics and Society, a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, the William H. Bonsall Visiting Professor in the Stanford Philosophy Department, a Laurance S. Rockefeller Fellow and a Visiting Professor at Princeton’s University Center for Human Values, a Visiting Professor at the Princeton Department of Politics, a Fellow of the Program on Justice and the World Economy at the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs, a Faculty Fellow at the Center for Ethics and Public Affairs at The Murphy Institute of Political Economy, and a Visiting Fellow at the Australian National University School of Philosophy.

    His public writing has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Los Angeles Times, Foreign Affairs, and the playbill for the White Light Festival at Lincoln Center. In London, he served for several years on the Mayor’s Policing Ethics Panel, which advises the Mayor and the Metropolitan Police on issues such as digital surveillance and the use of force.

    He is currently developing unity theory, a foundational account of what makes for more valuable lives, relationships, and societies. His published work can be found at wenar.info.

  • Karen Wigen

    Karen Wigen

    Frances and Charles Field Professor in History
    On Leave from 10/01/2020 To 06/30/2021

    BioKären Wigen teaches Japanese history and the history of cartography at Stanford. A geographer by training, she earned her doctorate at the University of California at Berkeley. Her first book, The Making of a Japanese Periphery, 1750-1920 (1995), mapped the economic transformation of southern Nagano Prefecture during the heyday of the silk industry. Her second book, A Malleable Map: Geographies of Restoration in Central Japan, 1600-1912 (2010), returned to the ground of that study, exploring the roles of cartography, chorography, and regionalism in the making of modern Shinano.

    An abiding interest in world history led her to co-author The Myth of Continents (1997) with Martin Lewis, and to co-direct the "Oceans Connect" project at Duke University. She also introduced a forum on oceans in history for the American Historical Review and co-edited Seascapes: Maritime Histories, Littoral Cultures, and Transoceanic Exchanges (2007) with Jerry Bentley and Renate Bridenthal. Her latest project is another collaboration, Cartographic Japan: A History in Maps, with co-editors Sugimoto Fumiko and Cary Karacas ( University of Chicago Press, forthcoming 2016).

  • Gail Wight

    Gail Wight

    Professor of Art and Art History

    BioGail Wight holds an MFA in New Genres from the San Francisco Art Institute where she was a Javits Fellow, and a BFA from the Studio for Interrelated Media at Massachusetts College of Art. She has an extensive international exhibition record, with over a dozen solo exhibits throughout North America and Great Britain, and her work has been collected by numerous institutions including the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Among her many artist residencies are western Australia’s Symbiotica, Art & Archaeology at Stonehenge, the Rockefeller Foundation in Bellagio, and San Francisco’s Exploratorium. Her work is represented by Patricia Sweetow Gallery in San Francisco.