School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-8 of 8 Results

  • Andrew G. Walder

    Andrew G. Walder

    Denise O'Leary & Kent Thiry Professor and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMarket reforms in China; and political movements in China during the Cultural Revolution.

  • Ban Wang

    Ban Wang

    William Haas Professor in Chinese Studies and Professor of Comparative Literature

    BioWilliam Haas Professor in Chinese Studies, Stanford University
    Departments of East Asian Languages and Comparative Literature
    Yangtze River Chair Professor, Simian Institute of Advanced Study,
    East China Normal University

  • Barry Weingast

    Barry Weingast

    Ward C. Krebs Family Professor and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and, by courtesy, at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioBarry R. Weingast is the Ward C. Krebs Family Professor, Department of Political Science, and a Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution. He served as Chair, Department of Political Science, from 1996 through 2001. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Weingast’s research focuses on the political foundation of markets, economic reform, and regulation. He has written extensively on problems of political economy of development, federalism and decentralization, legal institutions and the rule of law, and democracy. Weingast is co-author of Violence and Social Orders: A Conceptual Framework for Interpreting Recorded Human History (with Douglass C. North and John Joseph Wallis, 2009, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) and Analytic Narratives (1998, Princeton). He edited (with Donald Wittman) The Oxford Handbook of Political Economy (Oxford University Press, 2006). Weingast has won numerous awards, including the William H. Riker Prize, the Heinz Eulau Prize (with Ken Shepsle), the Franklin L. Burdette Pi Sigma Alpha Award (with Kenneth Schultz), and the James L. Barr Memorial Prize in Public Economics.

  • Karen Wigen

    Karen Wigen

    Frances and Charles Field Professor in History

    BioKären Wigen teaches Japanese history and the history of cartography at Stanford. A geographer by training, she earned her doctorate at the University of California at Berkeley. Her first book, The Making of a Japanese Periphery, 1750-1920 (1995), mapped the economic transformation of southern Nagano Prefecture during the heyday of the silk industry. Her second book, A Malleable Map: Geographies of Restoration in Central Japan, 1600-1912 (2010), returned to the ground of that study, exploring the roles of cartography, chorography, and regionalism in the making of modern Shinano.

    An abiding interest in world history led her to co-author The Myth of Continents (1997) with Martin Lewis, and to co-direct the "Oceans Connect" project at Duke University. She also introduced a forum on oceans in history for the American Historical Review and co-edited Seascapes: Maritime Histories, Littoral Cultures, and Transoceanic Exchanges (2007) with Jerry Bentley and Renate Bridenthal. Her latest project is another collaboration, Cartographic Japan: A History in Maps, with co-editors Sugimoto Fumiko and Cary Karacas ( University of Chicago Press, forthcoming 2016).

  • Mikael Wolfe

    Mikael Wolfe

    Assistant Professor of History

    BioI am an environmental historian of modern Mexico and Latin America focusing on the history of water control, agrarian reform, hydraulic technology, drought and climate change. In several published articles and in my book manuscript “Watering the Revolution: The Technopolitical Success and Socioecological Failure of Agrarian Reform in La Laguna, Mexico,” I examine the role of technical actors or “técnicos’ – in particular hydraulic engineers and agronomists – as mediators between the Mexican state, society and nature from the late 19th to 20th centuries. Based on extensive archival research on the emblematic cotton rich north-central arid Laguna region, I argue that técnicos confronted an irresolvable contradiction between their realization of the urgent need for conservation of scarce water resources and the insatiable popular demand for them as they implemented Latin America’s most ambitious agrarian reform decreed by populist president Lázaro Cárdenas in the region in 1936. Rather than the mostly passive implementers of grand socio-environmental state engineering schemes depicted in much interdisciplinary literature, I show that they were active participants able to exert considerable influence on both local water users and national politicians as they “modernized” the region’s conflict-ridden but ecologically benign flood irrigation system from the 1930s to the 1970s. More broadly, I demonstrate how the paradox of technopolitical success (the impressive construction of large dams, canals and groundwater pumping installations) and the socioecological failure (rapid depletion and contamination of both surface and subsurface waters) of agrarian reform in the paradigmatic Laguna was inscribed in the revolutionary 1917 Constitution, which mandated both agricultural development and the conservation of natural resources nationwide without specifying how, thereby making técnicos work at cross-purposes with major conflicts-of-interest. Unfortunately, despite more advanced knowledge of natural processes that was subsequently incorporated in new legislation more strictly regulating profligate water use, the contradiction persists to this day, if now in the globally discursive guise of “ecologically sustainable development.”

    My second book project, tentatively entitled “The Climate of Revolution: The case of Mexico,” analyzes the role of climate change, and in particular drought, on the coming, process and consequences of the Mexican Revolution. The book aims to integrate historical climatology with social history by contextualizing climate – or long-term meteorological phenomena that constitute an observable pattern socially and culturally perceived as such by people residing in a bounded geographical region with common ecological features – as one among numerous complex factors explaining how and why people make revolutions when and where they do.

    I teach a wide range of undergraduate and graduate courses in Mexican, Latin American, and comparative and global history on topics such as environmental change, technology, development, international relations, revolution and film.

  • Christine Min Wotipka

    Christine Min Wotipka

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCross-national analyses of gender, leadership, and higher education, and of representations of women's and children's rights in school textbooks. Other projects relate to mothers' aspirations for children in India, education programs for married immigrant women in the Republic of Korea, and understandings of the history of slavery among youth in the United States.