School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 32 Results

  • Victor Yanez

    Victor Yanez

    Lecturer

    BioVictor Yañez-Lazcano received his MFA from Stanford University and his BFA from Columbia College Chicago. While in Chicago he balanced a freelance career in both commercial and fine art photography. During this time, he also established himself as an arts educator through the Museum of Contemporary Photography and Columbia College’s Project AIM(Arts Integration and Mentorship). Yañez-Lazcano also helped to co-found LATITUDE, a non-profit community digital lab for photographers in Chicago. His work has been exhibited at numerous spaces including Royal Nonesuch Gallery(Oakland), Natalie & James Thompson Art Gallery (San Jose), Harrington College of Design, Columbia College Chicago’s A+D Gallery, and Riverside Arts Center, as well as Mind/Matter Gallery (Rochester), Aviary Gallery (Boston), and South Haven Center for the Arts(Michigan). Past residencies include SOMA Summer (Mexico City) the Industry of the Ordinary’s Summer School Residency(Chicago), ACRE(Stueben,WI), and Ox-Bow(Saugatuck, MI). Victor is currently a visiting lecturer in Art & Art History at Stanford University.

  • Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano

    Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano

    Professor of Iberian and Latin American Cultures, Emerita

    BioProfessor Yarbro-Bejarano is interested in Chicana/o cultural studies with an emphasis on gender and queer theory; race and nation; interrogating critical concepts in Chicana/o literature; and representations of race, sexuality and gender in cultural production by Chicanas/os and Latinas/os.

    She is the author of Feminism and the Honor Plays of Lope de Vega (1994), The Wounded Heart: Writing on Cherríe Moraga (2001), and co-editor of Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation (1991). She has published numerous articles on Chicana/o literature and culture. She teaches Introduction to Chicana/o Studies and a variety of undergraduate courses on literature, art, film/video, theater/performance and everyday cultural practices. Her graduate seminars include topics such as race and nation; interrogating critical concepts in Chicana/o literature; and representations of race, sexuality and gender in cultural production by Chicanas/os and Latinas/os.

    Since 1994, Professor Yarbro-Bejarano has been developing "Chicana Art," a digital archive of images focusing on women artists. Professor Yarbro-Bejarano is chair of the Chicana/o Studies Program in Stanford's Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity.

  • Ali Yaycioglu

    Ali Yaycioglu

    Associate Professor of History

    BioMy main research interest is the Middle East and the Balkans under the Ottoman Empire. In my forthcoming book, Partners of the Empire: Notables, Communities and the Crisis of the Ottoman Order (1770-1820), which is a revised version of my dissertation, I analyze the rise of the provincial notables and different forms of collective actions in various parts of the Ottoman world and their challenge to the empire. I depict how the new provincial formations triggered institutional restructuring of the Ottoman order in the global age of revolutions. Currently, I am working on two different projects. The first one is on capital accumulation and imperial confiscations in the Ottoman Empire, roughly from 16th to the early 19th centuries. In this project, I focus on economic and social implications of imperial confiscations and examine how some individuals and families developed strategies to maintain their wealth and power and to escape from the constant threat of imperial seizure. I also analyze how this instability of property rights affected attitudes towards inheritance, life and mortality in Ottoman society. My other project is on the imaginations of the political spaces in Early Modern Eurasia. In this project, I am particularly interested in the interactions and competitions between territorial organizations of the early modern Eurasian empires, particularly the Ottoman Empire, and exterritorial imaginations and practices of the Islamic and Chingissid legacies.

  • Lee Yearley

    Lee Yearley

    Walter Y. Evans-Wentz Professor of Oriental Philosophy, Religions and Ethics

    BioLee Yearley works in comparative religious ethics and poetics, focusing on materials from China and the West. He is the author of The Ideas of Newman: Christianity and Human Religiosity and Mencius and Aquinas: Theories of Virtue and Conceptions of Courage (recently translated into Chinese), as well as numerous journal articles and essays in edited volumes.

    Professor Yearley holds a Ph.D. from University of Chicago.