School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-24 of 24 Results

  • William Brewer

    William Brewer

    Lecturer

    BioWilliam Brewer is the author of I Know Your Kind (Milkweed Editions, 2017), a winner of the 2016 National Poetry Series, and Oxyana, selected for a 2016 Poetry Society of America's Chapbook Fellowship. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in American Poetry Review, The Nation, New England Review, The New Yorker, A Public Space, The Sewanee Review, and other journals. Formerly a Stegner Fellow, he is currently a Jones Lecturer at Stanford University.

  • Kai Carlson-Wee

    Kai Carlson-Wee

    Lecturer

    BioKai Carlson-Wee is the author of RAIL (BOA Editions, 2018). He has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, the Sewanee Writers' Conference, and his work has appeared in Ploughshares, Best New Poets, AGNI, New England Review, Gulf Coast, and The Missouri Review, which awarded him the 2013 Editor’s Prize. His photography has been featured in Narrative Magazine, and his poetry film, Riding the Highline, received the Jury Award at the 2015 Napa Valley Film Festival. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow, he lives in San Francisco and is a lecturer at Stanford University.

  • Harriet Clark

    Harriet Clark

    Lecturer

    BioHarriet Clark received her B.A. in African and African-American Studies from Stanford University, an M.F.A. in Fiction Writing from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and returned to Stanford as a Wallace Stegner Fellow in Fiction. She has been teaching Creative Writing at Stanford since 2010.

    For Harriet's Zoom link, please email: hjclark@stanford.edu

  • Keith Ekiss

    Keith Ekiss

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPoetry, Translation, Poetry and Film, Non-Realist literature.

  • John Evans

    John Evans

    Lecturer

    BioJohn W. Evans is the author of three books: Should I Still Wish: A Memoir (University of Nebraska Press, 2017), Young Widower: A Memoir (University of Nebraska Press, 2014), and The Consolations: Poems (Trio House Press, 2014). His books have won prizes including the Peace Corps Writers Book Prize, a ForeWord Reviews Book Prize, the River Teeth Book Prize, and the Trio Award. Should I Still Wish was selected by Poets and Writers magazine as a “new and noteworthy” title of January/February 2017, and is published in the American Lives Series. His work appears in The Missouri Review (2016 Editor’s Prize Finalist), Poets & Writers, Slate, Boston Review, ZYZZYVA, The Rumpus, and Best American Essays 2011 (Honorable Mention), as well as the chapbooks, No Season (FWQ, 2011) and Zugzwang (RockSaw, 2009). John is currently the Draper Lecturer of Creative Nonfiction at Stanford University, where he was previously a Jones Lecturer and a Wallace Stegner Fellow. He lives in Northern California with his wife and three young sons. He is at work on his first novel.

  • Sarah Frisch

    Sarah Frisch

    Lecturer

    BioSarah Frisch is a former Wallace Stegner Fellow and current Jones Lecturer. Her work has been published in The Paris Review, the VQR, and The New England Review. She has won a Pushcart Prize and been a finalist for the National Magazine Award. She is a 2017 winner of an Elizabeth George Foundation Grant for fiction. She holds an MFA in Fiction from Washington University in St. Louis.

  • Richard Joseph Hofmann

    Richard Joseph Hofmann

    Lecturer

    BioRichie Hofmann is the recipient of the Pushcart Prize and the Ruth Lilly Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation, among other honors, and his poems appear recently in The New Yorker, Poetry, and the New York Times Style Magazine. His debut collection of poems is Second Empire, winner of the Beatrice Hawley Award. A 2017-19 Wallace Stegner Fellow, he is currently Jones Lecturer in Poetry.

  • Scott Hutchins

    Scott Hutchins

    Lecturer

    BioScott Hutchins is a former Truman Capote fellow in the Wallace Stegner Program at Stanford University. His work has appeared in StoryQuarterly, Catamaran, Five Chapters, The Owls, The Rumpus, The New York Times, San Francisco Magazine and Esquire, and has been set to improvisational jazz. He is the recipient of two major Hopwood awards and the Andrea Beauchamp prize in short fiction. In 2006 and 2010, he was an artist-in-residence at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris. His novel A Working Theory of Love was a San Francisco Chronicle and Salon Best Book of 2012 and has been translated into nine languages.

  • Tom Kealey

    Tom Kealey

    Lecturer

    BioTom Kealey is the author of Thieves I've Known, winner of the Flannery O'Connor Award and an NPR Best Books. Tom also authored The Creative Writing MFA Handbook, and his stories have appeared in Best American NonRequired Reading, Glimmer Train, The Rumpus, and many other places.

    Tom teaches t a variety of classes at Stanford, including Novel Writing Intensive (the NanoWrimo Class), Secret Lives of the Short Story, Screenwriting Intensive, Short Story to Big Screen, and First Chapters.

  • Mark Labowskie

    Mark Labowskie

    Lecturer

    BioMark Labowskie is a Jones Lecturer and recent Wallace Stegner Fellow. His stories have appeared in Subtropics, Gulf Coast, and Sou'wester, and his writing has been supported by the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, Lighthouse Works, VCCA, and the Millay Colony.

  • Sara Gail Michas-Martin

    Sara Gail Michas-Martin

    Lecturer

    BioSara Michas-Martin is a poet and nonfiction writer who draws inspiration from science and the natural world. Specific teaching interests include contemporary American poetry, medical humanities, science communication and hybrid forms.

    Her book, Gray Matter, winner of the Poets Out Loud Prize and nominated for the Colorado Book Award, is a creative investigation of the relationship between the brain and one’s conscious understanding of self. A current project, titled Out in the Field, explores the biological and social transformation of new mothers. Integrating memoir and research, the text weaves together natural history, sleep science and the evolution of technology used to see inside the body.

    Sara holds a BFA from the University of Michigan and an MFA from the University of Arizona. She is a former Wallace Stegner Fellow and has received grants from the Barbara Deming Memorial Fund, the Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg prize, as well as fellowships from the Vermont Studio Center and the Bread Loaf and Squaw Valley Writers’ conferences. Her poems and essays have been published in the American Poetry Review, The Believer, Best New Poets, FIELD, Harvard Review, Kenyon Review, Threepenny Review and elsewhere. She lives with her family east of Monterey Bay and counts deer and bobcats among her neighbors.

  • Brittany Perham

    Brittany Perham

    Lecturer

    BioBrittany Perham is the author of DOUBLE PORTRAIT (W.W. Norton, 2017), which received the Barnard Women Poets Prize; THE CURIOSITIES (Free Verse Editions, 2012); and, with Kim Addonizio, the collaborative chapbook THE NIGHT COULD GO IN EITHER DIRECTION (SHP, 2016). She was a Wallace Stegner Fellow from 2009-2011. She lives in San Francisco.

  • Edward Porter

    Edward Porter

    Lecturer

    BioEdward Porter’s writing has appeared in Glimmer Train, The Gettysburg Review, The Hudson Review, Colorado Review, Catamaran, Barrelhouse, Best New American Voices, and elsewhere. A native of New York City, he earned an MFA from Warren Wilson College and a PhD from the University of Houston, and has been awarded fellowships at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the MacDowell Colony, and Stanford University, where he was recently a Stegner Fellow. He lives in Oakland.

  • Shannon Pufahl

    Shannon Pufahl

    Lecturer

    BioShannon Pufahl is a Jones Lecturer in the Creative Writing Program. She teaches fiction, creative nonfiction, and writing across genres. She was a Stegner Fellow in fiction at Stanford, where she received a Centennial award, the University's highest honor for teaching assistants. She has published essays in The Threepenny Review and elsewhere, on topics ranging from John Brown and the Antebellum Midwest, to personal memoir. Her novel, On Swift Horses, about gambling, sex, and the post-war American West, is forthcoming from Riverhead Books.

    Shannon is also a PhD candidate in American Literature and Culture at the University of California, Davis. Her dissertation traces the animal welfare movement in the U.S. from its origins in the 19th-century, through the intense debates about animal life, suffering, and intelligence at century's end, and into the young adult animal novels of the early 20th-century.

    She is the co-coordinator of The Writer's Studio, a weekly workshop series sponsored by the Creative Writing Program, the Stanford Storytelling Project, and the Hume Center for Writing and Speaking. She also teaches in the Stanford Arts Intensive and online in Summer Session.

  • Nina Schloesser Tarano

    Nina Schloesser Tarano

    Lecturer

    BioNina Schloesser Tárano was born and grew up in Guatemala City. She received her MFA from Columbia University. Her work has appeared in Fence and The New Inquiry Magazine. She came to Stanford in 2010 as a Wallace Stegner Fellow in Fiction, and has been teaching in the Creative Writing Program since 2012.

  • Charif Shanahan

    Charif Shanahan

    Lecturer

    BioJones Lecturer in Poetry, Creative Writing Program, Department of English.

    Shanahan is the author of Into Each Room We Enter without Knowing (Southern Illinois University Press, 2017), winner of the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry First Book Award and a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award for Gay Poetry and the Publishing Triangle’s Thom Gunn Award. He is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship; the Wallace Stegner Fellowship in Poetry; a Fulbright Senior Scholar Grant to Morocco; and residency fellowships from Cave Canem Foundation, MacDowell Colony, Millay Colony for the Arts, La Maison Baldwin in St Paul, France, and the Rauschenberg Foundation, among other honors and recognitions. Former Programs Director of the Poetry Society of America, he has taught poetry at California College of the Arts (CCA), Collegio di Milano (Italy), Dartmouth College, New York University, and Stanford University.

  • Michael Shewmaker

    Michael Shewmaker

    Lecturer

    BioMichael Shewmaker is the recent winner of the Hollis Summers Poetry Prize and author of Penumbra (Ohio UP, 2017). His poems recently appear in Yale Review, Virginia Quarterly Review, Sewanee Review, Poetry Daily, Parnassus, Oxford American, Narrative, and elsewhere. Born in Texarkana, Texas, he earned an MFA from McNeese State University and a PhD in creative writing from Texas Tech University. He is a Jones Lecturer in poetry at Stanford University.

  • Rose Whitmore

    Rose Whitmore

    Lecturer

    BioRose Whitmore earned her MFA from the University of New Hampshire. Her writing has appeared in Alaska Quarterly Review, Missouri Review, and Mid-American Review. She is the recipient of a work-study scholarship from the Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference, a residency from Hedgebrook, and the 2013 Peden Prize from the Missouri Review.