School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 143 Results

  • Diana Acosta Navas

    Diana Acosta Navas

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Philosophy

    BioDiana Acosta-Navas is an Embedded EthiCS fellow at Stanford University, based in the Center for Ethics in Society (EiS) and the Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI). She holds a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Harvard University, where she worked as adjunct lecturer in Ethics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. She was a recipient of the Edmond J. Safra Center Graduate Fellowship during the academic year 2017-2018, and worked as part of the Embedded EthiCS program in the years 2019 and 2020. Diana studied Philosophy at the Universidad de Los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia, after which she did a Master's program at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

    She works at the intersection of applied ethics, political philosophy, and public policy, addressing issues related to the protection of human rights in scenarios where violence, prejudice and inequality prevent their effective exercise. She has worked on analyzing the moral and political significance of transitional justice institutions and how these can be morally justified to the victims of human rights violations. Her current work analyzes how the moral principles that inspire the right to free speech may be best upheld in the current public forum and the role of digital platforms in creating conditions for a healthy public debate.

  • Karen Ajluni

    Karen Ajluni

    Director of Finance & Operations, Philosophy

    BioKaren Ajluni is the Director of Finance and Operations in the Departments of Philosophy and Religious Studies within the School of Humanities and Sciences (H&S) at Stanford University. Previously, Karen worked for six years as the Finance Manager in the Physics Department, also within H&S. Before coming to Stanford, Karen worked for four years at Santa Clara University, most recently as Assistant Dean of Administration and Finance in the School of Education and Counseling Psychology. Prior to that she was the Operations and Administration Manager of the Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship. Karen has been employed in non-profit and educational administration for over 25 years, and has experience with a wide variety of organizations, including Downtown College Prep High School, the Girl Scouts of Northern California, EHC Lifebuilders, Futures without Violence, and Project Match. She received a B.S. in Psychology from Santa Clara University and a Masters in Public Administration from San Jose State University. Karen lives at home with her husband and three children.

  • R. Lanier Anderson

    R. Lanier Anderson

    J. E. Wallace Sterling Professor of the Humanities
    On Leave from 09/01/2021 To 08/31/2022

    BioR. Lanier Anderson (Professor of Philosophy, J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor in Humanities) works in the history of late modern philosophy and has focused primarily on Kant and his influence on nineteenth century philosophy. He is the author of The Poverty of Conceptual Truth (OUP, 2015) and many articles on Kant, Nietzsche, and the neo-Kantian movement. Some papers include “It Adds Up After All: Kant’s Philosophy of Arithmetic in Light of the Traditional Logic” (Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 2004), “Nietzsche on Truth, Illusion, and Redemption” (European Journal of Philosophy, 2005), “What is a Nietzschean Self?” in Janaway and Robertson, eds., Nietzsche, Naturalism, and Normativity (OUP, 2011), and “‘What is the Meaning of our Cheerfulness?’: Philosophy as a Way of Life in Nietzsche and Montaigne” (European Journal of Philosophy, 2018). Current research interests include Kant’s theoretical philosophy, Nietzsche’s moral psychology, Montaigne, and special topics concerning existentialism and the relations between philosophy and literature (see, e.g., “Is Clarissa Dalloway Special?” Philosophy and Literature, 2017). He has been at Stanford since 1996, and has also taught at Harvard, Haverford, Bryn Mawr, and Penn. With Joshua Landy (Comparative Literature, French), he has been instrumental in Stanford’s Philosophy and Literature Initiative. He currently serves Stanford as Senior Associate Dean for Humanities and Arts.