School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 11-20 of 30 Results

  • David Hausman

    David Hausman

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    BioI study immigration enforcement and administrative courts. One of my current projects evaluates how effective county sanctuary policies were at preventing deportations under the Obama administration; another takes stock of the relative impact of the Trump administration's many changes to admission and deportation policy.

    From 2016 to 2019, I worked as an attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union Immigrants’ Rights Project in New York, where I helped litigate challenges to the Trump Administration’s use of immigration detention, its arbitrary revocation of DACA grants, and its Muslim Ban.

  • Dongxian Jiang

    Dongxian Jiang

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDongxian Jiang's primary research interests lie in comparative and international political theory, the history of political thought, and pressing practical questions of democratic and international politics, including Western and non-Western perspectives on human rights, good governance, political legitimacy, and cross-cultural dialogue.

  • Shiro Kuriwaki

    Shiro Kuriwaki

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    BioI received my Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2021. My research studies how electoral politics translates into democratic policymaking, especially in modern American Politics. I also develop statistical software to improve the measurement of public opinion and electoral behavior. My postdoctoral work at Stanford will include research with Professor Doug Rivers on new data and survey methods for describing the microgeography of electoral behavior. From July 2022, I will join the faculty at Yale University as Assistant Professor of Political Science.


    https://www.shirokuriwaki.com

  • Javier Mejia

    Javier Mejia

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Political Science

    BioJavier Mejia is an economist whose work focuses on the intersection between social networks and economic history. His interests extend to topics on entrepreneurship and political economy with a geographical specialty in Latin America and the Middle East. He received a Ph.D. in Economics from Los Andes University. He has been a Postdoctoral Associate and Lecturer at New York University--Abu Dhabi and a Visiting Scholar at the University of Bordeaux.

    Most of Javier’s research explores how social interactions have shaped the economy in the long term. He brings together theoretical and empirical methods from economics and conceptual tools from anthropology to the study of history. This has led him to explore an extensive set of historical objects. He has studied entrepreneurs in Colombia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, industrial elites in Morocco in the late 20th century, tribal societies in North Africa in the 19th century, early Muslim communities in the Levant and the Arabian Peninsula between the 7th and 9th centuries, and political elites in Colombia and the US in the early 19th century.

    Javier has teaching experience in multicultural environments, having taught at universities in Latin America, the United States, and the Middle East. He has taught courses on economic growth, economic history, and economic theory. At Stanford, he offers two courses that jointly provide an overview of economic evolution from a global-history and moral-philosophy perspective. On the one hand, Wealth of Nations studies the origins of economic development, the moral dilemmas underneath the development process, and the path that led to the configuration of the modern global economy. On the other hand, Societal Collapse studies the causes of economic decline, the social and political consequences of that decline, and the path that led to the disappearance of some of the most prosperous societies in human history.

    Javier is a regular contributor to different news outlets. Currently, he is a Forbes Magazine op-ed columnist.