School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 21-30 of 47 Results

  • Johannes Gumbrecht (test)

    Johannes Gumbrecht (test)

    Albert Guerard Professor of Literature and Professor of Comparative Literature, Emeritus

    BioHans Ulrich Gumbrecht is the Albert Guérard Professor in Literature in the Departments of Comparative Literature and of French & Italian (and by courtesy, he is affiliated with the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures/ILAC, the Department of German Studies, and the Program in Modern Thought & Literature). As a scholar, Gumbrecht focuses on the histories of national literatures in Romance language (especially French, Spanish, and Brazilian), but also on German literature, while, at the same time, he teaches and writes about the western philosophical tradition (from a "non-analytic" perspective) with an emphasis on French and German nineteenth- and twentieth-century texts. In addition, Gumbrecht tries to analyze and to understand forms of aesthetic experience in 21st-century everyday culture. Over the past forty years, he has published more than two thousand texts, including books translated into more than twenty languages. In Europe and in South America, Gumbrecht has a presence as a public intellectual; whereas, in the academic world, he has been acknowledged by nine honorary doctorates in six different countries: Canada, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Portugal, and Russia . He has also held a number of visiting professorships, at the Collège de France, University of Budapest, Universidade de Lisboa, University of Manchester, Université de Montréal, Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, and Catholic University of Santiago de Chile.

  • Robert Harrison

    Robert Harrison

    Rosina Pierotti Professor of Italian Literature

    BioProfessor Harrison received his doctorate in Romance Studies from Cornell University in 1984, with a dissertation on Dante's Vita Nuova. In 1985 he accepted a visiting assistant professorship in the Department of French and Italian at Stanford. In 1986 he joined the faculty as an assistant professor. He was granted tenure in 1992 and was promoted to full professor in 1995. In 1997 Stanford offered him the Rosina Pierotti Chair of Italian Literature. In 2002, he was named chair of the Department of French and Italian. In 2006 he became a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. In 2014 he was knighted "Chevalier" by the French Republic. He is also lead guitarist for the cerebral rock band Glass Wave.

    Professor Harrison's first book, The Body of Beatrice, was published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 1988. The Body of Beatrice was translated into Japanese in 1994. Over the next few years Professor Harrison worked on his next book, Forests: The Shadow of Civilization, which appeared in 1992 with University of Chicago Press. This book deals with the multiple and complex ways in which the Western imagination has symbolized, represented, and conceived of forests, primarily in literature, religion, and mythology. It offers a select history that begins in antiquity and ends in our own time. Forests appeared simultaneously in English, French, Italian, and German. It subsequently appeared in Japanese and Korean as well. In 1994 his book Rome, la Pluie: A Quoi Bon Littérature? appeared in France, Italy, and Germany. This book is written in the form of dialogues between two characters and deals with various topics such as art restoration, the vocation of literature, and the place of the dead in contemporary society. Professor Harrison's next book, The Dominion of the Dead, published in 2003 by University of Chicago Press, deals with the relations the living maintain with the dead in diverse secular realms. This book was translated into German, French and Italian. Professor Harrison's book Gardens: An Essay on the Human Condition appeared in 2008 with the University of Chicago Press, and in French with Le Pommier (subsequently appeared in German and Chinese translations). His most recent book Juvenescence: A Cultural History of Our Age came out in 2014 with Chicago University Press. In 2005 Harrison started a literary talk show on KZSU radio called "Entitled Opinions." The show features hour long conversations with a variety of scholars, writers, and scientists.

  • Johannes Junge Ruhland

    Johannes Junge Ruhland

    Ph.D. Student in French, admitted Autumn 2018

    BioJohannes Junge Ruhland studies manuscripts in Old French, Old Occitan and Franco-Italian. He holds a BA in French and Latin from the University of Geneva, and MA in French from King’s College London, and is now pursuing a PhD in French at Stanford University.
    In his current research, Johannes studies various forms of incongruence in multi-text manuscripts, pursuing the argument that under certain conditions, incongruence triggers in the manuscript’s readers specific thought experiments. This, he contends, allows to account for a large corpus of vernacular manuscripts otherwise studied as disorderly miscellanies, or else studied for the individual texts they contain. Tentatively and without claim to full coverage, manuscripts can serve as thought laboratories for thought experiments about the conditions of knowledge and the establishment of logical relations (some witnesses of the Bestiaire d’amour); for thought experiments that foreground the processes involved in the formation of a literary canon (troubadour songbooks G and Q); which require readers to think how they position themselves in historical time (Paris, BnF, fr. 821); and which emphasise the role of aesthetics in the formation of communities of knowledge (Chantilly, Bibliothèque et Archives du Château, MS 472). Johannes’ aim is to reassess medieval reading practices as immersive, participatory, and collective, to place the manuscript front and centre as the object of reading, and to pave the way for a pragmatic anthropology of vernacular literacy. His research has received funding from the Europe Center at Stanford University.
    Johannes has also worked on the political implications of philological practices, largely understood. In a forthcoming article on manuscript variance, he argues that the three dominant models of ‘text’ in Romance philology, by variously defining their object of study, enable different reader figures and therefore, condition the literary histories one can tell. This work partly derives from his research on London, BL, Additional 15268 (Histoire ancienne jusqu’à César), about which he argues that it served as an agent of communal identity-making, not only in late 13th-century Acre, but also beyond (forthcoming in print). In parallel, together with Federico Guariglia he has edited a section of a Venetian copy of the Histoire ancienne, Vienna, ÖNB, Cod. 2576), thus making available the text at a key stage in its transmission history.

    Visit Johannes’ Academia.edu profile for a list of publications (link to the right).

    Keywords: collectives, thought experiments, irony, incongruence, variance, non-intended readership, philology, poetics, pragmatics

  • Joshua Landy

    Joshua Landy

    Andrew B. Hammond Professor in French Language, Literature and Civilization, and Professor of Comparative Literature and, by courtesy, of English
    On Leave from 09/01/2019 To 08/31/2020

    BioJoshua Landy is the Andrew B. Hammond Professor of French, Professor of Comparative Literature, and co-director of the Literature and Philosophy Initiative at Stanford, home to a PhD minor and undergraduate major tracks in Philosophy and Literature.

    Professor Landy is the author of Philosophy as Fiction: Self, Deception, and Knowledge in Proust (Oxford, 2004) and of How To Do Things with Fictions (Oxford, 2012). He is also the co-editor of two volumes, Thematics: New Approaches (SUNY, 1995, with Claude Bremond and Thomas Pavel) and The Re-Enchantment of the World: Secular Magic in a Rational Age (Stanford, 2009, with Michael Saler). Philosophy as Fiction deals with issues of self-knowledge, self-deception, and self-fashioning in Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu, while raising the question of what literary form contributes to an engagement with such questions; How to Do Things with Fictions explores a series of texts (by Plato, Beckett, Mallarmé, and Mark) that function as training-grounds for the mental capacities.

    Professor Landy has appeared on the NPR shows "Forum" and "Philosophy Talk" (on narrative selfhood and on the function of fiction) and has on various occasions been a guest host of Robert Harrison's "Entitled Opinions" (with Lera Boroditsky on Language and Thought, with Michael Saler on Re-Enchantment, with John Perry and Ken Taylor on the Uses of Philosophy, and with Alexander Nehamas on Beauty).

    Professor Landy has received the Walter J. Gores Award for Teaching Excellence (1999) and the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching (2001).