School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 61-63 of 63 Results

  • Christine Min Wotipka

    Christine Min Wotipka

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCross-national, comparative and longitudinal analyses of 1) leadership and higher education with a focus on gender, race and ethnicity, and sexuality; and 2) representations of minoritized individuals and groups in school textbooks.

  • Sylvia Yanagisako

    Sylvia Yanagisako

    Edward Clark Crossett Professor of Humanistic Studies

    BioSylvia Yanagisako is the Edward Clark Crossett Professor of Humanistic Studies and Professor in the Department of Anthropology. Her research and publications have focused on the cultural processes through which kinship, gender, capitalism, and labor have been forged in Italy and the U.S. She has also written about the orthodox configuration of the discipline of anthropology in the U.S. and considered alternatives to it (Unwrapping the Sacred Bundle: Reflections on the Disciplining of Anthropology, 2005).

    Professor Yanagisako’s latest book, Fabricating Transnational Capitalism: a Collaborative Ethnography of Italian-Chinese Global Fashion (Duke University Press, 2019) co-authored with Lisa Rofel, analyzes the transnational business relations forged by Italian and Chinese textile and garment manufacturers. This book builds on her monograph (Producing Culture and Capital, 2002) which examined the cultural processes through which a technologically-advanced, Italian manufacturing industry was produced.

    Professor Yanagisako has served as President of the Society for Cultural Anthropology, Chair of the Department of Anthropology at Stanford, and Chair of the Program in Feminist Studies at Stanford. She received the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1992.

  • Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano

    Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano

    Professor of Iberian and Latin American Cultures, Emerita

    BioProfessor Yarbro-Bejarano is interested in Chicana/o cultural studies with an emphasis on gender and queer theory; race and nation; interrogating critical concepts in Chicana/o literature; and representations of race, sexuality and gender in cultural production by Chicanas/os and Latinas/os.

    She is the author of Feminism and the Honor Plays of Lope de Vega (1994), The Wounded Heart: Writing on Cherríe Moraga (2001), and co-editor of Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation (1991). She has published numerous articles on Chicana/o literature and culture. She teaches Introduction to Chicana/o Studies and a variety of undergraduate courses on literature, art, film/video, theater/performance and everyday cultural practices. Her graduate seminars include topics such as race and nation; interrogating critical concepts in Chicana/o literature; and representations of race, sexuality and gender in cultural production by Chicanas/os and Latinas/os.

    Since 1994, Professor Yarbro-Bejarano has been developing "Chicana Art," a digital archive of images focusing on women artists. Professor Yarbro-Bejarano is chair of the Chicana/o Studies Program in Stanford's Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity.