School of Medicine


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  • Neha Shirish Joshi, MD MS

    Neha Shirish Joshi, MD MS

    Clinical Scholar, Pediatrics
    Postdoctoral Scholar, Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    BioNeha S Joshi, MD MS is a Clinical Scholar in the Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine at Stanford University. Her clinical responsibilities include caring for hospitalized children at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford as a board certified Pediatric Hospitalist, and neonatal resuscitation and the care of level I/II late preterm and term newborns as a Neonatal Hospitalist. Dr. Joshi completed her MD with Distinction at the University of California San Francisco, followed by both residency in Pediatrics and fellowship in Pediatric Hospital Medicine at Stanford University. Dr. Joshi additionally completed a Masters in Clinical Research and Epidemiology at Stanford University. Her research program seeks to identify and implement high value care practices for late preterm and term infants during the birth hospitalization. Dr. Joshi's prior work has included the development of a clinical examination-based approach to identifying late preterm and term infants at risk for early onset sepsis; this work won the Jennifer Daru Memorial Award for manuscript with most potential to impact clinical care. Dr Joshi is currently working on identifying evidence-based admission criteria, clinical benchmarks, and quality markers for late preterm infants. Dr. Joshi's work has been supported by the NIH F32 Ruth L. Kirschstein Postdoctoral Individual National Research Service Award, the Gerber Foundation, and the Stanford Maternal and Child Health Research Institute.

  • Carmen Y.J. Lee

    Carmen Y.J. Lee

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe will compare the processes of learning and intervention designs of two groups in the context of planning for a QI intervention. One group will utilize SD Group Model Building processes, and another will use the conventional KDD and RBA approaches. Qualitative and quantitative analytic approaches will be utilized to compare the learning processes and the intervention approach generated by these two groups. We anticipate that this study will lead to insights into new approaches to improving Q

  • Marina Magalhães

    Marina Magalhães

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    BioMarina N. Carvalho Magalhães is a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Suzan Carmichael’s lab in the Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine. Her overall research goals are to improve health outcomes and advance maternal and infant health equity. Dr. Magalhães is a nurse by training in newborn critical care with a background using clinical research methods, particularly to support nutrition and optimize health outcomes of preterm, very low birthweight (VLBW) infants. Her doctoral research found that personalizing lactation support via biomarker-based text messages during early postpartum is feasible and may prolong lactation among mothers of critically ill infants. This experience, along with the growing maternal health crisis and research silos separating maternal and newborn health, led her to pursue postdoctoral training in perinatal epidemiology. Her current research centers on the health of women and childbearing people by using population-level data to investigate the causes of adverse perinatal health outcomes (i.e. severe maternal morbidity).

  • Dhriti Nagar

    Dhriti Nagar

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    BioPremature birth is a leading cause of developmental and neuropsychiatric disorders in children. One of the factors causing these defects is lowered levels of available oxygen (hypoxia) in the newborn due to immature lungs. My research focuses on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxia-induced developmental disorders of the nervous system due to preterm birth.