School of Medicine


Showing 61-70 of 86 Results

  • Daniel Eugene Clark

    Daniel Eugene Clark

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Clark completed a 4-year MD/MPH program at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio. He subsequently completed all of his post-graduate training at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), including Internal Medicine-Pediatrics, Adult Cardiology, and Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ACHD). Additionally, he served as Chief Fellow of the Vanderbilt Cardiovascular Medicine Fellowship, trained in multimodality cardiovascular imaging, and conducted clinical research during a two-year NIH-funded T32 research fellowship at VUMC.

    Prior to joining the Stanford ACHD faculty, he was appointed Instructor of Cardiovascular Medicine at Vanderbilt and read cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging as an attending for two years. He is appointed Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His academic and investigative interests focus on advanced cardiovascular imaging for ACHD patients, particularly the application of CMR in this population. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Dr. Clark pivoted his scholarly efforts to focus on studying the cardiovascular effects of COVID-19 with CMR. His current clinical investigations include understanding the CMR-derived diastolic patterns of Fontan physiology and the effect of cardiac rehabilitation on functional status among patients with Fontan failure.

  • John Clarke

    John Clarke

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioDr. John Clarke recently joined the Gastroenterology & Hepatology Division at Stanford University as Director of the Esophageal Program. He previously spent 17 years in Baltimore, including 9 years on the faculty at Johns Hopkins University where he was an Associate Professor and at various times Director of Esophageal Motility, Director of Gastrointestinal Motility, Clinical Director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Neurogastroenterology, and Clinical Director of the Gastroenterology & Hepatology Division at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.

    His career has combined research, education and clinical care. His clinical areas of expertise include achalasia, dysphagia, eosinophilic esophagitis, esophageal dysmotility, gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastroparesis, GI-manifestations of scleroderma and GI dysmotility. While at Johns Hopkins University, he was inducted into The Miller-Coulson Academy for Clinical Excellence, an institutional honor society for master clinicians at the time limited to 50 members across the entire university.

    From an education standpoint, he has lectured in over a dozen countries, authored over 25 textbook chapters and serves on the educational affairs committee of the American College of Gastroenterology. He has also won several major teaching awards, including The Johns Hopkins University Alumni Association Award for Excellence in Teaching, given to one faculty member per year in the entire School of Medicine.

    His research has focused on optimization and characterization of diagnostic studies to evaluate motility disorders, as well the relationship between therapeutic endoscopic techniques and treatment of motility disorders. He was an investigator on the NIH Gastroparesis Consortium and is also a former recipient of the AGA Don Castell Award.

  • Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Karel H. and Avice N. Beekhuis Professor of Cancer Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Clarke maintains a laboratory focused on two areas of research: i) the control of self-renewal of normal stem cells and diseases such as cancer and hereditary diseases; and ii) the identification and characterization of cancer stem cells. His laboratory is investigating how perturbations of stem cell regulatory machinery contributes to human disease. In particular, the laboratory is investigating epigenetic regulators of self renewal, the process by which stem cells regenerate themselves.

  • Shoa L. Clarke, MD, PhD

    Shoa L. Clarke, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
    Instructor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    BioDr. Clarke is a preventive cardiologist and an instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine in the Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics. He earned his undergraduate degree in human biology from the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University before obtaining his MD and PhD (genetics) from Stanford University School of Medicine. He has completed clinical training in internal medicine (Brigham & Women’s Hospital), pediatrics (Boston Children’s Hospital), and cardiovascular medicine (Stanford Hospital), and he is board certified in all three specialties. His research is focused on 1) understanding complex disease genetics in diverse populations, 2) integrating monogenic and polygenic risk with clinical risk, 3) large-scale phenotyping using the electronic health record. His clinical practice focuses on identifying risk factors for cardiovascular disease with the goal of promoting health and longevity through evidence-based personalized treatment. He is interested in developing family-centric approaches for the treatment of adults and children carrying high genetic risk for disease.

  • William Clusin, MD

    William Clusin, MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiac action potentials; tissue culture, voltage, clamp technique; role of calcium in ischemia arrhythmias; coronary, artery disease; myocardial infarction.

  • Stanley N. Cohen, MD

    Stanley N. Cohen, MD

    Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Genetics and of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study mechanisms that affect the expression and decay of normal and abnormal mRNAs, and also RNA-related mechanisms that regulate microbial antibiotic resistance. A small bioinformatics team within our lab has developed knowledge based systems to aid in investigations of genes.