School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 45 Results

  • Pascal Geldsetzer

    Pascal Geldsetzer

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioPascal Geldsetzer is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health and, by courtesy, in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health. He is also affiliated with the Department of Biomedical Data Science, Department of Health Policy, King Center for Global Development, and the Stanford Centers for Population Health Sciences, Innovation in Global Health, and Artificial Intelligence in Medicine & Imaging.

    His research focuses on identifying and evaluating the most effective interventions for improving health at older ages. In addition to leading several randomized trials, his methodological emphasis lies on the use of quasi-experimental approaches to ascertain causal effects in large observational datasets, particularly in electronic health record data. He has won an NIH New Innovator Award (in 2022), a Chan Zuckerberg Biohub investigatorship (in 2022), and two NIH R01 grants as Principal Investigator (both in 2023).

  • Linda N. Geng, MD, PhD

    Linda N. Geng, MD, PhD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy scholarly interests are focused on defining, studying, and improving patients' diagnostic journeys. What prolongs the journey to the correct diagnosis and how can we shorten it? With this question in mind, we are exploring crowdsourcing, informatics/AI, health data visualization, and advanced laboratory testing as ways to help tackle the toughest cases in medicine-- complex, rare, and mystery conditions.

    With the COVID pandemic, the puzzling and complex illness of post-acute COVID-19 syndrome (PACS) or long COVID came to light. Together with a multidisciplinary group of physicians and researchers, we launched a program here at Stanford to advance the care and understanding of PACS. Our goal is to better understand the natural history, clinical symptomatology, immunological response, risk factors, and subgroup stratification for PACS. We are also actively assessing management strategies that may be effective for heterogeneous PACS symptoms.

  • Mark Genovese

    Mark Genovese

    James W. Raitt M.D. Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical trials and interventions in the rheumatic diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis,Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic Sclerosis, Osteoarthritis.

  • Daniel Aaron Gerber, MD

    Daniel Aaron Gerber, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Gerber is a critical care cardiologist and co-director of Stanford's Cardiac ICU. He has dual subspecialty training in cardiovascular and critical care medicine and additional board certification in echocardiography. He completed his residency in internal medicine, fellowship in cardiovascular medicine, and an additional fellowship in critical care medicine at Stanford University and joined as faculty in 2021 as a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine’s Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.

    Dr. Gerber manages the full spectrum of heart and vascular conditions with a focus on critically ill patients with life-threatening cardiovascular disease. He is active in medical education, teaching introductory echocardiography to Stanford medical students and residents, co-directing the Stanford Critical Care Medicine Critical Care Ultrasound Program, and lecturing nationally on critical care echocardiography and point-of-care ultrasonography at the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s annual congress. Finally, Dr. Gerber’s research interests focus on optimizing cardiac intensive care, including working with the Critical Care Cardiology Trials Network (CCCTN) - a national network of tertiary cardiac ICUs coordinated by the TIMI Study Group - and studying acute mechanical circulatory support techniques to improve patient outcomes and care processes.

  • Neil Gesundheit

    Neil Gesundheit

    Senior Associate Dean for Medical Education, George DeForest Barnett Founders Professor of Medicine and Professor (Teaching) of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur medical education research group is developing and validating the best educational practices to train competent, compassionate, and ethical physicians and physician-scientists. We are studying the use of standardized patients and other modalities to improve clinical skill training and reasoning. We are interested in applying the rigor of clinical investigation to education research.

    My areas of clinical interest in endocrinology include disorders of the pituitary, thyroid, and gonad.

  • Olivier Gevaert

    Olivier Gevaert

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab focuses on biomedical data fusion: the development of machine learning methods for biomedical decision support using multi-scale biomedical data. We primarily use methods based on regularized linear regression to accomplish this. We primarily focus on applications in oncology and neuroscience.

  • Karleen Giannitrapani

    Karleen Giannitrapani

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    BioResearch Focus: In contrast to bounded teams with static membership, dynamic teaming reflects the common challenge of interdisciplinary healthcare teams with changing rosters. Such dynamic collaboration is critical to addressing multi-faceted problems and individualizing care. At present, off the shelf interventions to improve the way healthcare teams work - often assume static and bounded teams. I intend to leverage design approaches to build a new kind of healthcare “teaming intervention,” which respects the nature of their constantly changing membership and more closely aligns with how healthcare teams actually collaborate.

    Expertise: My expertise includes organizational behavior, building interdisciplinary teams, implementation science, mixed methods-research, quality improvement, pain and palliative care research, and global health.

    Positions: I am an Instructor in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford University School of Medicine and a Core Investigator at the Center for Innovation to Implementation (Ci2i) in the VA Palo Alto Health Care System where I am PI or co-investigator on multiple ongoing studies representing over 25 million dollars of competitive government grant funding. I am also a Director of the VA Quality Improvement Resource Center (QuIRC) for Palliative Care, supporting Geriatrics and Extended Care programs for 170 Veterans Affairs facilities nationally. In QuIRC I lead a portfolio of projects on improving the processes that interdisciplinary teams can leverage to improve pain and symptom management among high-risk patients; specifically I’m aiming to bridge the gap of poor palliative care integration in the perioperative period.

    Accomplishments: I have over 50 peer reviewed publications in high quality medical and health services delivery journals such as Medical Care, JAMA Surgery, the Journal of General Internal Medicine, the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management and Pain Medicine. I recently received a 5-year VA Career Development Award on building better teams across disciplines and am an American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine Research Scholar for related work.