School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 10 Results

  • Joachim Hallmayer

    Joachim Hallmayer

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrincipal Investigator
    Infrastructure to facilitate discovery of autism genes
    The purpose of this project is to facilitate the discovery of the genes that contribute autism by maintaining an infrastructure which research groups studying the genetics of autism can work collaboratively. This will be
    accomplished through workshops, a Virtual Private Network, and access to a database that includes phenotype and genotype data from all participating groups.

    Principal Investigator
    A California Population-Based Twin Study of Autism
    This will address several fundamental questions: (1) What is the heritability of autism (2) What is the contribution of genetic factors to variation in symptom dimensions? (3) Is there a continuum between the quantitative neurocognitive traits and clinical disorder? (4) What proportion of the variance in the neurocognitive traits is accounted for by genetic and non-genetic factors?

    Co-Investigator
    Center for Integrating Ethics in Genetics Research(Cho)
    The goal of this project is to serve as a center of excellence in neurogenetics research, to develop a national model for bench, to bedside research ethics consultation, and to provide training opportunity in biomedical ethics.

    Co-Investigator
    Gene, Brain and Behavior in Turner Syndrome(Reiss)
    The primary objective of this project is to use advanced, multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, analyses of X chromosome parent-of-origin and cognitive-behavioral assessment to elucidate the effects of monosomy and X-linked imprinting on neurodevelopment and neural function in a large cohort of young girls with Turner syndrome, pre-estrogen replacement.

    Project Director
    Project F: Genomic Analysis in narcolepsy cataplexy
    The goal of the project is to locate genes outside the HLA region that influence susceptibility to narcolepsy. In order to localize these genes we will carry out a linkage and association study in the most extensive world-wide collection of DNAs from well-characterized patients with narcolepsy and their families.

  • Bonnie Halpern-Felsher

    Bonnie Halpern-Felsher

    Marron and Mary Elizabeth Kendrick Professor of Pediatrics and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch focuses on developmental, cognitive and psychosocial factors involved in adolescents’ and young adults’ health-related decision-making, perceptions of risk and vulnerability, health communication and risk behavior. My research has focused on understanding and reducing health risk behaviors such as tobacco use, alcohol and marijuana use, risky driving, and risky sexual behavior.

  • Antonio Hardan, M.D.

    Antonio Hardan, M.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe neurobiology of autism
    Neuroimaging in individuals with autism
    Psychopharmacological treatment of children and adults with autism and/or developmental disorders
    The neurobiology and innovative interventions of several neurogenic disorders including DiGeorge Syndrome (Velocardiofacial syndrome; 22q11.2 mutations), PTEN mutations, and Phelan McDermid Syndrome (22q13 mutations).

  • Korey Hood

    Korey Hood

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychology)

    BioDr. Hood directs NIH- and foundation-funded clinical research aimed at promoting health and quality of life outcomes for people with diabetes. He has expertise and experience with diabetes epidemiology and interventions, study design, methodology, data management, and advanced statistical methods. There are two content threads to his work: 1) construct prevention and treatment programs to address modifiable psychological and family factors that create barriers to optimal diabetes management, and 2) optimize the use of devices and technologies to improve health outcomes. With regard to the first thread, Dr. Hood has successfully implemented depression screening programs in tertiary diabetes and GI clinics within a Quality Improvement framework, and recently completed a large scale clinical trial on a distress prevention program for teens with type 1 diabetes. Dr. Hood manages and analyzes all the data from these studies. From a device and technology standpoint, Dr. Hood coordinates the Human Factors assessments in Drs. Maahs’ and Buckingham’s closed loop studies and is recognized as one of the experts in this area nationally and internationally. In addition, he has implemented Human Factors assessments in national (e.g., T1D Exchange) studies and registries and is the lead psychologist on 2 of the 4 UC4 grants from NIDDK (Hovorka, PI; Bergenstal, PI). These assessments focus on uptake of devices and technologies, and determining strategies to promote uptake and optimize their use. Dr. Hood and his research team have published over 100 scientific articles on these topics and are active presenters at diabetes, behavioral medicine, and advocacy conferences.

    Dr. Hood also works in clinical and service settings. Dr. Hood is a licensed clinical psychologist and is part of the diabetes care team at Stanford. He is the past chair of the American Diabetes Association’s Behavioral Medicine and Psychology Interest Group and is currently a member of the Research Policy Committee. He was also a member of the ADA’s Call to Congress in March 2017. Dr. Hood is an Associate Editor for both Diabetes Care and Pediatric Diabetes.

  • Kristene Hossepian

    Kristene Hossepian

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

    BioDr. Kristene Hossepian is a licensed clinical psychologist with expertise in anxiety, depression, eating disorders, parent management training, and stress. During her doctorate training at the PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium she received extensive training in a number of evidence-based treatment approaches for children and adolescents, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. She completed her pre-doctoral internship at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital/Children’s Health Council where she worked with youth struggling with severe eating disorders, chronic medical conditions, trauma, depression, and anxiety. After receiving her doctorate in 2020, Dr. Hossepian completed her postdoctoral fellowship at the Stanford University School of Medicine, where she continued to receive training in evidence-based treatments for youth with a variety of presenting problems at the inpatient and outpatient level.

    Currently, Dr. Hossepian is a Clinical Assistant Professor within the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She works alongside Dr. Mary Sanders and Dr. Jennifer Derenne at the Comprehensive Care Program serving children and adolescents who are medically compromised due to complications with their eating disorders. Additionally, Dr. Hossepian works within Dr. Victoria Cosgrove’s Stress, Resilience, Emotion, and Mood (StREam) Laboratory to identify the ways that psychobiological stress responsivity is implicated in the emergence and propagation of affective symptomatology. Dr. Hossepian is interested in exploring the physiological mechanisms underlying mood disorders and eating disorders as well as providing children and adolescents with novel emotion regulation strategies.