School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 11 Results

  • Michael Hendrickson

    Michael Hendrickson

    Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDiagnosis of progressive stages of uterine cancer; classification of ovarian tumors; breast cancer diagnosis and prognostic factors, soft tissue neoplasm, uterine mesenchymal neoplasm.

  • John Higgins

    John Higgins

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI work as a diagnostic surgical pathologist doing translational research in renal neoplasia and medical renal disease and neoplastic and medical liver disease. Subspecialty areas of clinical interest include diagnostic immunohistochemistry, renal, hepatic and transplant pathology.

  • Marie Hollenhorst, MD, PhD

    Marie Hollenhorst, MD, PhD

    Clinical Instructor, Pathology
    Clinical Instructor, Medicine - Hematology

    BioDr. Hollenhorst is a physician and scientist with expertise in non-malignant hematology, transfusion medicine, and chemical biology. Dr. Hollenhorst values the one-on-one relationships that she forms with her patients, and strives to deliver the highest quality of care for individuals with blood diseases. Her experience caring for patients drives her to ask scientific questions in the laboratory, where she aims to bring a chemical approach to the study of non-malignant blood disease.

    Dr. Hollenhorst pursued combined MD and PhD training at Harvard University, where she received a PhD in Chemical Biology under the mentorship of Professor Christopher T Walsh. She subsequently completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, a fellowship in Transfusion Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and a fellowship in Hematology at Stanford.

    Dr. Hollenhorst has an interest in the biology of platelets, which are cellular fragments that help the blood to maintain a healthy balance between bleeding and clotting. Working in the laboratory of Professor Carolyn Bertozzi of Stanford Chemistry, Dr. Hollenhorst is studying sugar molecules found on the surface of platelets that are important in controlling their function and lifespan.

    Dr. Hollenhorst's research is supported by an NIH K99 Career Pathway to Independence in Blood Science Award for Physician-Scientists, a Stanford Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health Physician-Scientist Fellowship, and a National Blood Foundation Early-Career Scientific Research Grant.

  • Jody Elizabeth Hooper

    Jody Elizabeth Hooper

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have a number of research interests associated with my autopsy work, including how the time interval between death and collection (the PMI) affects the condition and research viability of the collected tissue, how valuable blood and tissue cultures behave after death, and how autopsy results affect clinical practice in an established information loop. I have projects exploring physician and family attitudes towards autopsy and the utilization of rapid autopsy tissue in characterizing cancer evolution from genetic and immunologic standpoints.

  • Dikran Horoupian

    Dikran Horoupian

    Professor (Clinical) of Pathology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeuropathology of:
    1. Neurodegenerative diseases
    2. Neurodevelopmental disorders
    3. CNS neoplasms
    4. Nerve & muscle diseases

  • Brooke Howitt

    Brooke Howitt

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    BioDr. Howitt is a gynecologic and sarcoma pathologist, with academic interests in gynecologic mesenchymal tumors and morphologic and clinical correlates of molecular alterations in gynecologic neoplasia.

  • Michael R. Howitt

    Michael R. Howitt

    Assistant Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab is broadly interested in how intestinal microbes shape our immune system to promote both health and disease. Recently we discovered that a type of intestinal epithelial cell, called tuft cells, act as sentinels stationed along the lining of the gut. Tuft cells respond to microbes, including parasites, to initiate type 2 immunity, remodel the epithelium, and alter gut physiology. Surprisingly, these changes to the intestine rely on the same chemosensory pathway found in oral taste cells. Currently, we aim to 1) elucidate the role of specific tuft cell receptors in microbial detection. 2) To understand how protozoa and bacteria within the microbiota impact host immunity. 3) Discover how tuft cells modulate surrounding cells and tissue.