School of Medicine


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  • Benjamin Joseph Hoover

    Benjamin Joseph Hoover

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Medical Psychiatry

    BioDr. Hoover graduated with a BS in Biology and a minor in Chemistry from Duke University. After his undergraduate studies, he joined the Leppla Laboratory at the National Institutes of Health as an Intramural Research Training Awardee. While there, he investigated the use of engineered anthrax toxin as a chemotherapeutic, and he graduated from the NIH Academy, with extensive coursework in health disparities. Then he returned to the Duke University School of Medicine, where he earned his MD in 2017. While in medical school, his interest in infectious disease evolved into curiosity about the gut-brain axis. He investigated gut sensation and its role in behavior using 3D electron microscopy, ultimately publishing a novel characterization of tuft cell ultrastructure.

    Given his growing interest in behavior, Dr. Hoover pursued psychiatry residency at the MGH McLean program. During this time, he was accepted into the R-25 funded Physician Scientist Training Program and joined the Kahn Laboratory at the Joslin Diabetes Center. He employed an iPSC model to investigate the role of insulin signaling dysfunction in Alzheimer’s Disease pathogenesis. His clinical interests also began to focus on the intersection of medical and psychiatric disease. He served as a chief resident and won the Anne Alonso Award for Psychotherapy and the Residency Neuroscience Award. After residency, he was accepted into the MGH Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Fellowship.

    After graduating from fellowship in 2022, Dr. Hoover joined the Stanford University School of Medicine faculty as a Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. As part of the Medical Psychiatry division, he consults on hospitalized patients with psychiatric comorbidities within intensive care units and general medical and surgical floors. The interface between endocrinology and psychiatry remains a particular area of clinical and research interest, and he brings years of previous laboratory experience in this area to his clinical practice.

  • Valerie Hoover

    Valerie Hoover

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioValerie Hoover, PhD is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist in California who specializes in the assessment and treatment of anxiety disorders, stress management and recovery, trauma and PTSD, interpersonal issues, and psychological adjustment following medical events. Dr. Hoover is also an expert in motivational enhancement and is a MINT-Certified Motivational Interviewing trainer.

    Dr. Hoover completed a doctorate in Clinical Psychology with an emphasis in Health Psychology at the University of Florida in 2013, then went on to complete her clinical residency at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and post-doctoral fellowship at the San Francisco VA Medical Center.

    Dr. Hoover is passionate about helping people make meaningful and durable changes in their lives.

  • Hadi Hosseini

    Hadi Hosseini

    Associate Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab’s research portfolio crosses multiple disciplines including computational neuropsychiatry, cognitive neuroscience, multimodal neuroimaging and neurocognitive rehabilitation. Our computational neuropsychiatry research mainly involves investigating alterations in the organization of connectome in various neurodevelopmental and neurocognitive disorders using state of the art neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, sMRI, DWI, functional NIRS) combined with novel computational methods (graph theoretical and multivariate pattern analyses).

    The ultimate goal of our research is to translate the findings from computational neuropsychiatry research toward developing personalized interventions. We have been developing personalized interventions that integrate computerized cognitive rehabilitation, real-time functional brain imaging and neurofeedback, as well as virtual reality (VR) tailored toward targeted rehabilitation of the affected brain networks in patients with neurocognitive disorders.

  • Kristene Hossepian

    Kristene Hossepian

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

    BioDr. Kristene Hossepian is a licensed clinical psychologist with expertise in anxiety, depression, eating disorders, parent management training, and stress. During her doctorate training at the PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium she received extensive training in a number of evidence-based treatment approaches for children and adolescents, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. She completed her pre-doctoral internship at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital/Children’s Health Council where she worked with youth struggling with severe eating disorders, chronic medical conditions, trauma, depression, and anxiety. After receiving her doctorate in 2020, Dr. Hossepian completed her postdoctoral fellowship at the Stanford University School of Medicine, where she continued to receive training in evidence-based treatments for youth with a variety of presenting problems at the inpatient and outpatient level.

    Currently, Dr. Hossepian is a Clinical Assistant Professor within the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She works alongside Dr. Mary Sanders and Dr. Jennifer Derenne at the Comprehensive Care Program serving children and adolescents who are medically compromised due to complications with their eating disorders. Additionally, Dr. Hossepian works within Dr. Victoria Cosgrove’s Stress, Resilience, Emotion, and Mood (StREam) Laboratory to identify the ways that psychobiological stress responsivity is implicated in the emergence and propagation of affective symptomatology. Dr. Hossepian is interested in exploring the physiological mechanisms underlying mood disorders and eating disorders as well as providing children and adolescents with novel emotion regulation strategies.

  • Rona Hu

    Rona Hu

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Hu is Medical Director of the Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Unit at Stanford Hospital, specializing in the care of those with serious mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, bipolar and depression. She completed medical school and residency in psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, and fellowships in Pharmacology and Schizophrenia Research through the National Institutes of Health. She is also active in the minority issues and cultural psychiatry, and has received regional and national recognition for her clinical care, research and teaching.

  • Andrew D. Huberman

    Andrew D. Huberman

    Associate Professor of Neurobiology and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn 2017, we developed a virtual reality platform to investigate the neural and autonomic mechanisms contributing to fear and anxiety. That involved capturing 360-degree videos of various fear-provoking situations in real life for in-lab VR movies, such as heights and claustrophobia, as well as unusual scenarios like swimming in open water with great white sharks. The primary objective of our VR platform is to develop new tools to help people better manage stress, anxiety and phobias in real-time, as an augment to in-clinic therapies.

    In May 2018, we reported the discovery of two novel mammalian brain circuits as a Research Article published in Nature. One circuit promotes fear and anxiety-induced paralysis, while the other fosters confrontational reactions to threats. This led to ongoing research into the involvement of these brain regions in anxiety-related disorders such as phobias and generalized anxiety in humans.

    In 2020, we embarked on a collaborative effort with Dr. David Spiegel's laboratory in the Stanford Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, aimed to explore how specific respiration patterns synergize with the visual system to influence autonomic arousal and stress, and other brain states, including sleep.

    In 2023, the first results of that collaboration were published as a randomized controlled trial in Cell Reports Medicine, demonstrating that specific brief patterns of deliberate respiration are particularly effective in alleviating stress and enhancing mood, and improving sleep.

    In a 2021, our collaboration with Dr. Edward Chang, professor and chair of the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), was published in Current Biology, revealing that specific patterns of insular cortex neural activity may be linked to, and potentially predict, anxiety responses.

  • Lynne C. Huffman

    Lynne C. Huffman

    Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
    On Partial Leave from 02/01/2024 To 08/31/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests and activities include (1) shared decision-making in clinical care; (2) medical education research; (3) the early identification and treatment of behavioral problems, particularly in children with special health care needs; and (4) community-based mental health/educational program evaluation and outcomes measurement.

  • Keith Humphreys

    Keith Humphreys

    Esther Ting Memorial Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Humphreys researches individual and societal level interventions for addictive and psychiatric disorders. He focuses particularly on evaluating the outcomes of professionally-administered treatments and peer-operated self-help groups (e.g., Alcoholics Anonymous), and, analyzing the impact of public policies touching addiction, mental health, public health, and public safety.