School of Medicine


Showing 21-40 of 66 Results

  • Daniel Imler

    Daniel Imler

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in understanding the impact of smart, agile clinical pathways to drive behavior change among providers.

  • Fatih Inci

    Fatih Inci

    Affiliate, Rad/Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection

    BioDr. Fatih Inci is currently working as a Research Scientist at Stanford University School of Medicine, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection. He has been guiding and working with a group of researchers, including postdoctoral fellows, graduate, undergraduate, and high school students, who focus on micro- and nano-technologies for biomedical and bioengineering applications. Dr. Inci received his B.Sc. degree at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics in 2007 with magna cum laude honor from Istanbul University (Turkey), and also studied as an Sokrates student at the Department of Biology in University of Groningen (Netherlands) in 2005. He received his Ph.D. degree at the Department of Molecular Biology-Genetics & Biotechnology with summa cum laude honor from Istanbul Technical University (Turkey) in 2013. During his Ph.D. studies, he was also appointed as a visiting scientist at University of New South Wales (Sydney, Australia) and University of Technology Sydney (Australia), as well as working as a research scholar/trainee at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH)-Harvard Medical School, and Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology Division (Boston, MA). Upon the completion of his Ph.D. studies, Dr. Inci worked as a postdoctoral research fellow at BWH-Harvard Medical School (2013-2014) and Stanford University School of Medicine (2014-2015).

    Dr. Inci has published his research work in the most prestigious journals, including Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), ACS Nano, Nature Scientific Reports, Nature Light: Science & Applications, Small, Lab on a chip, Advanced Science, Biomacromolecules, Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, ACS Chemical Reviews, Biotechnology Advances, Annual Review of Medicine, Materials Today, Trends in Biotechnology. Besides his research publications, he has contributed to the publication of 7 book chapters (including 3 chapters in press) and 3 editorial/perspective papers. He is also editing 3 scientific books in the world's renowned publishers, i.e., Springer Press and World Scientific Publishing Company. His research findings have been presented in national and international conferences, ranging in geography from Barcelona to Osaka, Sydney to Boston, Rio de Janeiro to San Diego and Phoenix to San Francisco. Moreover, he has secured his research findings, technological developments, and scientific discoveries with 6 U.S. patents. Some of them have already been licensed by companies to produce commercial products in the United States, and distributed throughout the world. One such example is his patent in the field of forensics that has been translated into two viable commercial products (CSI-Q and NGDE) produced in the United States by DxNow, Inc.

    Dr. Inci’s qualified scientific work has been highlighted and recognized by well-renowned national and international organizations as well as government entities, including National Institute of Health, Nature Medicine, Science AAAS, Popular Science, Newsweek, Boston University, Canary Center-Stanford University, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, A*STAR, Center for Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology (CIMIT), and Epilepsy Foundation. He has also been awarded with various scholarships and grants from European Molecular Biology Organization-European Science Foundation (EMBO-ESF), American Chemical Society, and Turkey Scientific and Technological Research Society (TUBITAK). He is a professional member at the world’s largest and most prestigious scientific societies, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), and National Postdoctoral Association (NPA).

  • Erik Ingelsson

    Erik Ingelsson

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)
    On Leave from 01/02/2020 To 12/31/2020

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in the link between metabolic disturbances, such as obesity and insulin resistance, and the development of cardiovascular disease. Our research is translational and interdisciplinary, combining population-based studies with molecular biology to reach new insights into the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and related conditions, identification of new biomarkers for improved risk prediction, and discovery of novel drug targets.

  • Alexander Ioannidis

    Alexander Ioannidis

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Biomedical Data Sciences

    BioAlexander Ioannidis (PhD, MPhil) graduated summa cum laude from Harvard University in Chemistry and Physics and earned an M.Phil in Computational Biology and Diploma in Greek from the University of Cambridge. His Ph.D. from Stanford University was in Computational and Mathematical Engineering, where he teaches machine learning and data science. He also has an M.S. in Mgmt. Sci. and Eng. (Optimization) from Stanford. Prior to Stanford, he worked in superconducting computing logic and quantum computing at Northrop Grumman. As a current research fellow in the Stanford School of Medicine (Department of Biomedical Data Science), his work focuses on applying computational methods to problems in genomics and population genetics.

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    I work on novel algorithm design (particularly ancestry related) for several large-scale genomic studies that aim at understanding genetic causes of disease.

    I also focus on projects at the intersection of history and population genetics, including work with native communities. As the grandson of Cappadocian refugees expelled from their native land, I try to engage with the complex sentiments of displaced indigenous peoples in these projects. Pain over the disruption of community heritage and over dispossession from traditional sites often remains raw. If engagement with descendant communities is lacking, research into our past can often feel like a continuation, even a legitimation, of dispossession. Combined alongside a dialogue with native communities, however, genetics can play a small role in helping to reclaim ancestral stories and dispersed ancestral connections. I hope our work in this area plays a constructive role in that process.

    As written by the poet Rumi in the language of the Cappadocians (Rûm),
    پیمی تیِ پَاثیِسْ پیمی تی خاسِس
    “Tell me what happened to you, tell me what you have lost.”
    [Rumi; Konya ms 67; translit. πε με τι έπαθες, πε με τι έχασες]

  • John P.A. Ioannidis

    John P.A. Ioannidis

    Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research), of Epidemiology and Population Health and by courtesy, of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMeta-research
    Evidence-based medicine
    Clinical and molecular epidemiology
    Human genome epidemiology
    Research design
    Reporting of research
    Empirical evaluation of bias in research
    Randomized trials
    Statistical methods and modeling
    Meta-analysis and large-scale evidence
    Prognosis, predictive, personalized, precision medicine and health
    Sociology of science

  • Cristiana Iosef

    Cristiana Iosef

    Basic Life Science Research Scientist, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Cristiana Iosef returned to Stanford University Medical School in Feb 2019, after serving for five years, as a research associate professor of Pharmacology, in the Nevada State University. Enthusiastically, Cristiana joined Dr Michael Fischbein’s research program in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, and she will focus on the molecular cues leading to vascular aneurysms. The long-term goal is to design high precision personalized therapies based on induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) aimed to restore the defective signaling pathways associated with cardio-vascular pathologies, or to predict their evolution. This collaboration started in 2010 while being a member of the Stanford/Pediatrics Department (Alvira lab) and yielded an important publication: Merk DR, Chin JT, Dake BA, Maegdefessel L, Miller MO, Kimura N, Tsao PS, Iosef C, Berry GJ, Mohr FW, Spin JM, Alvira CM, Robbins RC, Fischbein MP. miR-29b participates in early aneurysm development in Marfan syndrome. Circ Res. 2012 Jan 20;110(2):312-24. Dr Iosef is a dvm-surgeon and molecular signaling expert and she began her research career as a Fulbright Graduate Scholar in Washington University School of Medicine (St Louis, MO). She continued to specialize in animal models for human medicine practice in the Ohio State University. Prior to joining Stanford University in 2010, Cristiana developed an important body of work on signal-transduction and proteomic profiling of placental mesenchymal stem cells, in the University of Western Ontario, Canada (2001-10). In addition to her academic duties, Cristiana served as an associate director of the Mountain West Clinical Translational Research Consortium (2016-19). When she is not in the lab, Dr Iosef can be found hiking on the Pacific coast, skiing in the Sierras, visiting art galleries or she may study for her brown-belt exam in martial arts at JKA Shotokan Stanford. Aside from being a devoted vet-surgeon scientist, Cristiana is the proud mom of a young corporate lawyer.

  • Eric Ip

    Eric Ip

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests include the use and abuse of anabolic steroids and other performance enhancing/cognitive enhacing drugs.