School of Medicine


Showing 1-9 of 9 Results

  • Maya Katz, MD

    Maya Katz, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Katz is a board-certified neurologist who specializes in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders. She is also a clinical associate professor of neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    In her clinical practice, she develops a comprehensive, compassionate treatment plan for every patient in her care. She excels at deep brain stimulation, neuromodulation, and other advanced treatment approaches. She also works closely with each patient’s caregivers and family members to help ensure optimal well-being and quality of life for all involved in the management of Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Lewy body dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, and other conditions.

    Her research activities include serving as a co-investigator of the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative funded by the Michael J. Fox Foundation. She is a site principal investigator for a National Institutes of Health-funded study of the application of palliative care to Parkinson’s disease. Previously, she was a co-investigator for studies of remote access to care for Parkinson’s disease and patient-centered outcomes in Parkinson’s disease, both funded by the National Parkinson Foundation.

    Dr. Katz has earned many honors, including the ”Advancing Parkinson’s Therapies” conference award from the Parkinson’s Foundation and the “Fostering New Directions in Research” award from the Movement Disorders Society. She won scholarships from Weill Cornell Medical College, the Joseph Collins Foundation, and Anna E. Ray Robinson Education Fund.

    She has presented her research findings at global meetings such as the International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society and the International Palliative Care Society. She also has made presentations at national meetings of the American Academy of Neurology as well as regional conferences.

    She has authored numerous articles on the topics of outpatient palliative care for Parkinson’s disease, caregiver burden in Parkinson’s disease, virtual visits for Parkinson’s disease, and diagnosis of cervical dystonia. Her work has appeared in journals including Neurology, Annals of Palliative Medicine, Contemporary Clinical Trials, Movement Disorders Clinical Practice, and Neurotherapeutics.

    In addition, she is a reviewer for JAMA Neurology, the Journal of Neurological Sciences, Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, the brain imaging and stimulation section of Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, and Parkinsonism and Related
    Disorders.

    Dr. Katz is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society, Parkinson’s Foundation, Parkinson’s Study Group, American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, and American Telemedicine Association. She also is an invited speaker at community support groups for people with Parkinson’s disease.

  • Lucas Kipp

    Lucas Kipp

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Kipp specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of neuroimmunological disorders, particularly demyelinating conditions such as multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. He is interested in translational research connecting expert MS clinicians, world-renown immunology laboratories, and advanced neuroimaging techniques to identify biomarkers of disease and treatment response.

  • Hannah Louise Kirsch, MD

    Hannah Louise Kirsch, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioHannah Louise Kirsch, MD is a board-certified neurologist and a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Neurocritical Care Division of the Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Kirsch is also a hospitalist who pays special attention to delivering Stanford Health Care patients the best possible neurological care.

    She serves on the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke committee dedicated to coma and conditions related to consciousness. She has implemented numerous neurology-centered educational activities for health care professionals from diverse specialties, including training psychiatrists on the neuropsychiatric complications of COVID-19. She also has helped educate oncologists and hematologists regarding common neurological conditions among cancer patients.

    Dr. Kirsch has conducted research on a range of topics, including thrombotic complications in critically ill COVID-19 patients, advances in intracranial pressure monitoring, and predictors of outcomes in acute encephalitis. She has published her findings in Neurology, the Journal of Trauma, Emergency Medicine, and Procedures, among other journals.

    She has given presentations on topics including variations in coagulation among patients with cerebral hemorrhage and the association of cerebral pressure with cardiac arrest. She has shared her discoveries at meetings of the Neurocritical Care Society and Society of Hospital Medicine.

    The Neurocritical Care Society has honored her work. She also won the prestigious Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award, which recognizes clinical excellence, outstanding compassion in the delivery of care, and respect for patients, families, and health care colleagues.

    Dr. Kirsch received her medical degree from New York University. She completed her residency in neurology at the University of California, San Francisco, and a fellowship in neurocritical care at Columbia University. She also completed the Columbia University narrative medicine certificate program and is board certified in neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  • Juliet Klasing Knowles

    Juliet Klasing Knowles

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Knowles lab studies how white matter structure changes in different forms of epilepsy, and how aberrant white matter structure, in turn, shapes neuronal network function. In mouse models, we use a variety of innovative tools including neurophysiology, quantitative EEG, behavior, histological measures of white matter structure and MR imaging. We also conduct clinical research to study white matter abnormalities in children with epilepsy.

  • Lironn Kraler, MD

    Lironn Kraler, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Kraler is a board-certified neurologist with subspecialty training in vascular neurology, and a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Kraler is also the Associate Program Director for the Vascular Neurology Fellowship at Stanford.

    Before joining the faculty at Stanford, Dr. Kraler attended medical school at Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California where she was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha National Honor Society. She completed her residency training at Stanford Hospital where she served as chief resident, followed by her Vascular Neurology fellowship training at Stanford. She then completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at Stanford University’s Clinical Excellence Research Center (CERC) focused on addressing the high cost of care in US Hospitals.

    Her research interests include improving access and quality of population health and developing high-value innovations in care delivery that decrease the cost of care while improving the quality to patients. In addition, she has a strong interest in medical education. Dr. Kraler has received recognition for outstanding medical student teaching from the Department of Neurology.

  • Prashanth Krishnamohan, MD

    Prashanth Krishnamohan, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Assistant Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Krishnamohan is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist. He is a clinical assistant professor of neurology and neurological sciences and, by courtesy, of neurosurgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. In addition, he is Medical Director of the Neurosciences Service Line at Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare and is Medical Director of its Stroke program.

    Dr. Krishnamohan excels in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological conditions. His clinical interests include the management of stroke, epilepsy, concussion, and coma. With every patient, his goal is to provide personalized care designed to optimize neurological function for the best possible clinical outcome and quality of life.

    He has published extensively on topics including innovations in stroke care quality management and measurement, rapid bedside evaluation of seizures in the ICU, and EEG metrics in comatose cardiac arrest patients. Articles by Dr. Krishnamohan have appeared in Neuroanesthesia and Neurocritical Care, Quality Management in Healthcare, Current Infectious Disease Reports, and other journals. He has presented his research findings at the annual meetings of the Neurocritical Care Society and American Academy of Neurology.
    He has authored chapters on post-concussive syndrome, stroke, and other conditions for the guidebook Ferri’s Clinical Advisor. In addition, he is a reviewer for the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, Neurohospitalist, and the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry.

    Dr. Krishnamohan has won recognition from Stanford Health Care, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Open School, the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, and PSG Institute of Medical Sciences and Research – the latter two his alma maters.

    Dr. Krishnamohan is a member of the Neurocritical Care Society, American Academy of Neurology, and American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. He volunteers as a community health educator with numerous organizations.

  • Kathryn Kvam

    Kathryn Kvam

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Assistant Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Kvam's research focuses on 1) how to measure quality of care for patients with neurologic disease, 2) the value and impact of neurohospitalist models of care on patient outcomes and trainee education and 3) outcomes in rare diseases like autoimmune encephalitis.