School of Medicine


Showing 1-5 of 5 Results

  • Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Dennis Farrey Family Professor of Pediatrics, and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D. Director of the Program in Human Gene Therapy and Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Genetics. Respected worldwide for his work in gene therapy for hemophilia, Dr. Kay and his laboratory focus on establishing the scientific principles and developing the technologies needed for achieving persistent and therapeutic levels of gene expression in vivo. The major disease models are hemophilia, hepatitis C, and hepatitis B viral infections.

  • Electron Kebebew, MD, FACS

    Electron Kebebew, MD, FACS

    Harry A. Oberhelman, Jr. and Mark L. Welton Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Kebebew’s translational and clinical investigations have three main scientific goals: 1) to develop effective therapies for fatal, rare and neglected endocrine cancers, 2) to identify new methods, strategies and technologies for improving the diagnosis and treatment of endocrine neoplasms and the prognostication of endocrine cancers, and 3) to develop methods for precision treatment of endocrine tumors.

  • Saad A. Khan, MD

    Saad A. Khan, MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    BioDr. Khan is a fellowship-trained cancer specialist with board certification in oncology and hematology. He is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology.

    Dr. Khan focuses on the treatment of head and neck cancers, advanced thyroid cancers, and neuroendocrine tumors. He recognizes the broad effects of these conditions on daily living and aims to develop personalized, comprehensive treatment plans that optimize health and quality of life.

    Dr. Khan’s research interests include therapeutic clinical trials as well as ways to reduce toxicities that some patients may experience when receiving cancer treatment. His research activities include ongoing clinical trials of targeted and immune therapy for aggressive thyroid cancer.

    He has published numerous articles on his research discoveries in peer-reviewed journals such as the JAMA Oncology, Investigational New Drugs, and others. Topics include new drug treatments for small cell lung cancer and for cancers of the head and neck, racial and gender disparities in certain types of cancer, and management of the potentially toxic effects of cancer therapies.

    Dr. Khan is a member of the NRG Head and Neck Committee. NRG brings together internationally recognized groups (the first words in their names form the acronym “NRG”) to conduct cancer clinical research and share study results. The objective is to inform clinical decision making and healthcare policy worldwide.

    Dr. Khan is a member of the ECOG Head and Neck Core and Thoracic Committees. ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group) is part of one of the five groups of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) Program.

    He also is a member of the National Cancer Institute’s Central IRB for Early Phase Clinical Trials.

    When not providing patient care or conducting research, Dr. Khan enjoys spending time with his family, hiking, and relaxing at the beach.

  • Chaitan Khosla

    Chaitan Khosla

    Wells H. Rauser and Harold M. Petiprin Professor and Professor of Chemistry and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in this laboratory focuses on problems where deep insights into enzymology and metabolism can be harnessed to improve human health.

    For the past two decades, we have studied and engineered enzymatic assembly lines called polyketide synthases that catalyze the biosynthesis of structurally complex and medicinally fascinating antibiotics in bacteria. An example of such an assembly line is found in the erythromycin biosynthetic pathway. Our current focus is on understanding the structure and mechanism of this polyketide synthase. At the same time, we are developing methods to decode the vast and growing number of orphan polyketide assembly lines in the sequence databases.

    For more than a decade, we have also investigated the pathogenesis of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine, with the goal of discovering therapies and related management tools for this widespread but overlooked disease. Ongoing efforts focus on understanding the pivotal role of transglutaminase 2 in triggering the inflammatory response to dietary gluten in the celiac intestine.

  • Eric Kool

    Eric Kool

    George A. and Hilda M. Daubert Professor of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests• Design of cell-permeable reagents for profiling, modifying, and controlling RNAs
    • Developing fluorescent probes of DNA repair pathways, with applications in cancer, aging, and neurodegenerative disease
    • Discovery and development of small-molecule modulators of DNA repair enzymes, with focus on cancer and inflammation