School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 23 Results

  • Amanda Kirane, MD, PhD-c, FACS, FSSO

    Amanda Kirane, MD, PhD-c, FACS, FSSO

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (General Surgery)

    BioDr. Kirane is a fellowship-trained, board-certified specialist in complex general surgical oncology. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery, Section of Surgical Oncology, at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Kirane serves as Director of Cutaneous Surgical Oncology at the Stanford Cancer Center and her clinical practice focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of melanoma and other skin cancers. She partners closely with patients and families to provide the most effective treatment approach possible. For each patient, she tailors an evidence-based, personalized care plan that is innovative, comprehensive, and compassionate.

    Dr. Kirane is Principal Investigator of multiple studies in melanoma and mechanisms of resistance to immunotherapy, with focus on myeloid biology. Her current interests include immune response and novel therapies in melanoma, predictive modeling of patient responses using organoid technology, and translational biomarker development. She has led research into immune therapy for earlier stage melanoma using regionally directed therapy to augment immune response in melanoma and trials in surgical care in melanoma.

    The National Institutes of Health, American Society of Clinical Oncology, the Melanoma Research Alliance, and others have funded her research. She has co-authored articles on her discoveries in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Nature Communications, Nature Genetics, Cancer Research, Journal of Surgical Oncology, Annals of Surgery, Annals of Surgical Oncology, and elsewhere. Topics include intratumoral therapy, biomarker development, macrophage biology in melanoma and immunotheraputic resistance, and patient-derived organoid modeling. Dr. Kirane has presented updates on the management of melanoma and other cancers to her peers at meetings of the American College of Surgeons, Society of Surgical Oncology, and Society for Immunotherapy in Cancer.

    Dr. Kirane has earned awards for her achievements in clinical care, research, and scholarship. The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, Society of Surgical Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and other prestigious organizations have honored her work. She is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons (FACS) and Society of Surgical Oncology (FSSO). She is a member of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, American Association of Cancer Research, Society for Melanoma Research, Connective Tissue Oncology Society, Association of Academic Surgeons, and Association of Women Surgeons.

    She volunteers her time and expertise on behalf of the Melanoma Research Foundation, members of her community in need, STEM programs for girls, and other initiatives. She also is fellowship trained in Physician Wellness and Wellbeing and teaches somatic technique, mindfulness-based stress reduction, meditation, and breathwork.

  • Varvara A. Kirchner

    Varvara A. Kirchner

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    BioDr. Kirchner completed her medical school, surgical residency and multi-organ transplant fellowship in adult and pediatric liver, pancreas, kidney transplantation and total pancreatectomy with islet auto-transplantation at the University of Minnesota. She underwent further training in living donor liver transplantation and hepatobiliary surgery at the Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. Her clinical practice involves living and deceased donor liver and kidney transplantation in adult and pediatric patients as well as total pancreatectomy with islet auto-transplantation for patients with chronic and acute recurrent pancreatitis. She currently serves as Surgical Director of the Islet Cell Auto-Transplant at Stanford Children’s and Associate Director of the Living Donor Liver Transplant Program at the Division of Abdominal Transplantation. Dr. Kirchner’s research focuses on the biology of aging, cellular and solid organ transplantation. Her specific interests are in auto-islet transplantation, iPSC-derived hepatocyte therapies and liver regeneration. Dr. Kirchner's research on the impact of donor age on generation of iPSC-derived hepatocyte-like cells is supported by the NIA K08 Faculty Development Award. She is an active member of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons and the International Liver Transplantation Society.

  • Derek M. Klarin, MD

    Derek M. Klarin, MD

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (Vascular Surgery)
    On Leave from 06/01/2024 To 05/31/2025

    BioDr. Klarin is a fellowship-trained vascular surgeon.

    For each patient, he develops a comprehensive, compassionate care plan customized to individual needs. His goal is to help each patient achieve the best possible health and quality of life.

    Dr. Klarin performs the full spectrum of diagnostic and treatment procedures for cardiovascular conditions. He treats carotid disease, peripheral artery disease, abdominal aortic aneurysm, venous thromboembolism, and other vascular diseases.

    To help advance his field, Dr. Klarin has conducted research. The American Heart Association, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and other organizations have provided grants to support his studies. He also has co-patented advances in predicting and scoring risk factors for cardiovascular disease and other conditions.

    He has published extensively and co-authored more than 50 articles on new techniques and technology for diagnosing and treating cardiovascular disorders. His work has appeared in the Journal of Vascular Surgery, Circulation, JAMA, Nature Medicine, and other peer-reviewed journals.

    He also has made many invited presentations to his peers. He has spoken at the Vascular Research Initiatives Conference presented by the Society for Vascular Surgery, the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, and the annual meeting of the American Society for Human Genetics. Topics include risk factors for peripheral artery disease, the benefits of ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm, and the impact of genetic variations on cardiovascular disease.

    He is a member of the Global Lipids Genetics Consortium. He is a founding member of the Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Genetics Consortium and the Peripheral Artery Disease Genetics Consortium. He is also a candidate member of the Society for Vascular Surgery.

  • Lisa Marie Knowlton, MD, MPH, FACS, FRCSC

    Lisa Marie Knowlton, MD, MPH, FACS, FRCSC

    Associate Professor of Surgery (General Surgery)

    BioDr. Knowlton is an Associate Professor of Surgery and an Acute Care Surgeon whose practice encompasses trauma surgery, emergency general surgery and surgical critical care. She is an NIH funded public health researcher whose focus is on improving access to and quality of care for trauma and other surgical patients. She obtained her medical degree at McGill University and completed her general surgery residency at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Her desire to understand varied healthcare systems and develop solutions for vulnerable surgical populations led her to obtain an M.P.H. at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and complete a research fellowship at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative. Most recently, she trained as a Surgical Critical Care fellow at Stanford University Medical Center and joined the faculty as an Assistant Professor of Surgery in early 2018. She was promoted to Associate Professor in the University Medical Line in 2023.

    Dr. Knowlton's research focuses on improving health equity, addressing barriers in access to care and reducing disparities among vulnerable surgical populations, including underinsured trauma patients. She is also investigating the financial burden that injury imposes upon both patients and hospitals, with the goal of finding economically sustainable strategies for ensuring best outcomes among trauma patients. These include the study of emergency Medicaid programs at the state and national level. Dr. Knowlton’s work has been funded by the American College of Surgeons (the 17th C. James Carrico Faculty Research Fellowship), the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) and the NIH. She has received an R21 by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, and most recently an R01 for her work (2023-2028). Dr. Knowlton is board certified by the American Board of Surgery and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. She is a member of the AAST Diversity and Inclusion and Healthcare Economics Committees, and also serves on the Association for Academic Surgery’s Publications Committee. She was the inaugural Chair of the Associate Member Council of the AAST and currently serves as the Associate Vice Chair of Research for the Stanford Department of Surgery. She was recently recognized by the AAST by receiving the 2023 Canizaro award for best presentation and manuscript at the annual meeting. Dr. Knowlton was also selected as the 2023-24 U.S. recipient of the James IV Surgical Association Traveling Fellowship.

  • James R. Korndorffer, Jr. MD, MHPE, FACS

    James R. Korndorffer, Jr. MD, MHPE, FACS

    Associate Professor of Surgery (General Surgery)

    BioJames R Korndorffer Jr MD MHPE FACS joined the Stanford Department of Surgery in December 2017 as the inaugural Vice Chair of Education. Dr. Korndorffer received his undergraduate degree in Biomedical Engineering from Tulane University where he graduated cum laude. He returned to Florida and received his medical degree from the University of South Florida College of Medicine. While there he served as class vice president and was selected as a student member for the LCME reaccreditation committee. His general surgery internship and residency was completed at The Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, NC.

    Upon completion of his residency, Dr. Korndorffer went into private practice however his interest in teaching was so strong that after 8 years, he left a successful private practice and joined the faculty at Tulane University School of Medicine as a fellow in minimally invasive surgery and as an instructor in surgery. At the completion of the fellowship, he chose to stay at Tulane and joined the faculty as an Associate Professor of Surgery in 2005. He achieved the rank of Professor of Surgery in 2010. While at Tulane he served in numerous leadership roles. He was Vice Chair of the surgery department from 2012-17 as well as the Program Director for the surgical residency from 2006-17. As program director, he was responsible for redesigning the educational experience of the surgical residency after the catastrophic events of Hurricane Katrina. Additional medical school wide leadership roles he held included Assistant Dean for Graduate Medical Education (assistant DIO) and founding Medical Director for the Tulane Center for Advance Medical Simulation. Because of his passion for education, while working full time at Tulane, Dr. Korndorffer completed his Masters in Health Professions Education at the University of Illinois, Chicago.

    He is actively involved in numerous national societies including service to the American Board of Surgery through membership on the editorial board of the Surgical Council on Resident Education and the EPA revision workgroup and EPA writing group. He serves as the inaugural chair of the research division for the Association for Program Directors in Surgery, and the inaugural co-chair of the Education Council for the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons. He also serves on the Board of Directors for SAGES. He has served the American College of Surgeons in numerous capacities including the ACS-AEI as Recorder, Program Chair and Research Committee Chair and as a member of the faculty development committee. He serves as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Surgical Education. He was recently inducted to membership in the Academy of Master Surgeon Educators.

    He was one of the early adopters of the use of simulation for surgical training and has been actively involved in surgical education research since 2003. Some of the early work using proficiency-based training instead of time base training for skill acquisition. This has now become the norm. He is now actively involved investigating the role simulation education has in patient quality and healthcare system safety.

    Dr. Korndorffer has published over 100 papers in peer reviewed journals, 10 book chapters and has had over 150 presentations at national meetings. Dr. Korndorffer’s clinical interests include minimally invasive surgery for gastrointestinal disorders and hernias. His research interests include surgical education, surgical simulation, patient safety, and patient care quality.